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Australian soldiers control ghost robot dogs with their minds using new UTS technology

Unbelievable moment when Australian soldiers control ‘ghost robots’ with their SPIRIT using new technology designed to keep hands free for weapons

  • New technology allows soldiers to control ghost robots using brainwaves
  • It was developed by the University of Technology Sydney and demonstrated in May
  • Technology detects brain waves and then translates visual signals to instruct the robot

Australian Army soldiers have demonstrated with their minds the mastery of ‘ghost robots’ thanks to new groundbreaking technology developed for combat.

The new technology allows the user to focus on one of six white squares that flicker on an augmented reality lens at different frequencies.

Each of the six squares represents six predetermined locations where the robot can go.

The biosensor on the back of the head then detects brain waves from the visual cortex and then translated and decoded it to give the robot instructions.

A video released by Defense Australia shows an Army sergeant showing the robot move on command and interact with Army soldiers.

New technology developed by University of Technology Sydney allows soldiers to control ghost robots using brainwaves

New technology developed by University of Technology Sydney allows soldiers to control ghost robots using brainwaves

Each of the six dots represents six predetermined locations where the robot can go

Each of the six dots represents six predetermined locations where the robot can go

The user focuses on six white squares that flicker at different frequencies on the augmented reality lens.  The biosensor detects brain waves and translates instructions for the robot

The user focuses on six white squares that flicker at different frequencies on the augmented reality lens. The biosensor detects brain waves and translates instructions for the robot

Developed by the University of Technology Sydney (UTS), the technology consists of HoloLens mixed reality smartglasses and a graphene biosensor to control a Ghost Robotics four-legged robot.

It was tested in May at the Majura Training Area, Canberra, with the Army Robotics and Autonomous Implementation and Coordination Office (RICO).

The technology allows soldiers to control the robots hands-free, which is ideal for combat.

RICO Lieutenant Colonel Kate Tollenaar said the technology will help soldiers be safer in the field as they may be able to use these robotic dogs for future acquisitions.

“So the technology we’ve been demonstrating today is called a brain-robot interface, and it’s a way for a soldier-operator to control an autonomous system and use its brain signals,” she said.

“So instead of a voice or command console or some other form of commands, we can use a headset interface that allows them to move an autonomous system and today we use the Ghost Robots because RICO has experience experimenting with this kind of autonomous system.” .

“The military definitely plays a role in developing this technology beyond funding and we have a set of use cases that we want to work with a range of stakeholders to find the best way to test this technology and mitigate the risks. future acquisitions, especially in the area of ​​autonomy.’

The technology was demonstrated in May at the Majura Training Area, Canberra with the Army Robotics and Autonomous Implementation and Coordination Office

The technology was demonstrated in May at the Majura Training Area, Canberra with the Army Robotics and Autonomous Implementation and Coordination Office

The ghost robots allow soldiers to control them hands-free, which is ideal for combat situations

The ghost robots allow soldiers to control them hands-free, which is ideal for combat situations

Sergeant Damian Robinson of the 5th Combat Service Support Battalion said controlling the robots has more to do with visual concentration than mindfulness.

“The control that I can exert over the robot is that I can tell it to go to some of, in this case, six predetermined locations,” he said.

“You don’t have to think anything specific to make the robot work, but you do have to focus on that flicker so it’s more of a visual concentration than clearing your head and paying attention.”

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