Australian sensation Kaylee McKeown, 20, wins GOLD in the 100m backstroke at the Tokyo Games

Aussie sensation Kaylee McKeown, 20, wins GOLD in 100m backstroke at Tokyo Games – breaking Olympic record and bragging about her bronze medalist sister

  • Kaylee McKeown has won her first ever gold medal in the women’s 100m backstroke
  • The 20-year-old broke the world record in the Australian Olympic trials last month
  • She stormed home to knock over Canadian Kylie Masse, who was at WR pacetemp

Australian swimming prodigy Kaylee McKeown has won her first-ever gold medal and flew home to win the women’s 100m backstroke.

The 20-year-old, who broke the world record at the Australian Swimming Trials in June, added Olympic champion to that title, continuing the Australian girls’ success in the pool.

Canadian Kylie Masse had a strong lead heading into the 50m corner and was 0.19 seconds ahead of McKeown’s world record time, but the young Aussie stormed home to take gold.

“F*ck yeah!” McKeown told Channel 7’s pool reporter after the race, delivering a shaka in true Aussie fashion.

Australian swimming prodigy Kaylee McKeown has won her first-ever gold medal and flew home to win the women’s 100m backstroke

Canadian Kylie Masse had a strong lead heading into the 50m corner and was 0.19 seconds ahead of McKeown's world record time, but the young Aussie stormed home to take gold

Canadian Kylie Masse had a strong lead heading into the 50m corner and was 0.19 seconds ahead of McKeown’s world record time, but the young Aussie stormed home to take gold

McKeown’s family, including her gold medal-winning former Olympic sister Taylor, watched from Australia, overcome with emotion when she was interviewed immediately after Kaylee’s win.

“I’ll talk to her later,” her mother said about her swearing.

Her father Sholto died in August last year after a battle with cancer, with his daughter getting a tribute tattoo that reads ‘you’re always with me’ on her foot.

“I use it every day I wake up,” McKeown said of her father last month.

“I know it’s a privilege to be on this earth and walk and talk.”

The Olympic record was broken in four consecutive races in the 100-meter backstroke, with Canada’s Kylie Masse, American Regan Smith and McKeown all breaking the record. Smith would then break it again in her semifinal to qualify as fastest.

Four-time Olympian Emily Seebohm hugs Kaylee McKeown after winning gold in 100m backstroke in Tokyo

Four-time Olympian Emily Seebohm hugs Kaylee McKeown after winning gold in 100m backstroke in Tokyo

The 20-year-old, who broke the world record at the Australian Swimming Trials in June, added Olympic champion to that title, continuing the Australian girls' success in the pool.

The 20-year-old, who broke the world record at the Australian Swimming Trials in June, added Olympic champion to that title, continuing the Australian girls’ success in the pool.

McKeown admitted she felt the pressure during the event so far in the Games, especially after her world record last month.

“I think I pressured myself to be honest,” McKeown said after her semifinal.

“I like the nerves – it means you’re about to do something special and you care about what you’re doing. So as long as I have those nerves, I’m happy.’

The gold is Australia’s third at the Tokyo Games so far, including Ariarne Titmus’ stunning victory over Katie Ledecky in the 400m freestyle and the women’s 4x100m relay.

Compatriot Emily Seebohm finished fifth in her fourth Olympics.

McKeown will play a major role in the remaining events, with medal prospects in the 200m backstroke, 200m individual medley, 4×100 medley relay and 4x100m mixed medley relay.

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