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The 64-year-old Australian made it three quarters of the way up the climb chain of the 800 meter-tall rock on Tuesday when he became unwell. Luckily his tour group included two off duty police officers and two paramedics who performed CPR

Non-indigenous man, 64, suffers a heart attack while climbing Uluru – but critics say he shouldn't have attempted the climb of the rock

  • A 64-year-old man suffered a heart attack while climbing Uluru on Tuesday
  • He made it three quarters of the way up the climb before he became unwell
  • Fellow climbers performed CPR and a defibrillator to regular his heart beat
  • He was airlifted to Alice Springs Hospital and is now in a stable condition
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A man who was climbing Uluru suffered a heart attack but survived thanks to fellow climbers performing emergency CPR.

The 64-year-old Australian made it three quarters of the way up the climb chain of the 800 meter-tall rock on Tuesday when he became unwell.

Luckily his tour group included two off duty police officers and two paramedics who performed CPR.

The 64-year-old Australian made it three quarters of the way up the climb chain of the 800 meter-tall rock on Tuesday when he became unwell. Luckily his tour group included two off duty police officers and two paramedics who performed CPR

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The 64-year-old Australian made it three quarters of the way up the climb chain of the 800 meter-tall rock on Tuesday when he became unwell. Luckily his tour group included two off duty police officers and two paramedics who performed CPR

Within five minutes they used a defibrillator to shock him back into a 'survivable rhythm'.

He was brought back down the rock in a stretcher and was airlifted to Alice Springs Hospital.

He remains in a stable condition and will be transferred to Royal Adelaide Hospital on Wednesday afternoon.

He was brought back down the rock in a stretcher and was airlifted to Alice Springs Hospital where he remains in a stable condition

He was brought back down the rock in a stretcher and was airlifted to Alice Springs Hospital where he remains in a stable condition

He was brought back down the rock in a stretcher and was airlifted to Alice Springs Hospital where he remains in a stable condition

Every year more than 400,000 tourists visit Uluru, with between 400 and 500 people climbing it every day - sparking outrage with people who find it disrespectful to climb the sacred site

Every year more than 400,000 tourists visit Uluru, with between 400 and 500 people climbing it every day - sparking outrage with people who find it disrespectful to climb the sacred site

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Every year more than 400,000 tourists visit Uluru, with between 400 and 500 people climbing it every day – sparking outrage with people who find it disrespectful to climb the sacred site

The Royal Flying Doctor Service was the tour guide for having a defibrillator with them at the time.

Uluṟu-Kata Tjuṯa National Park have thanked the public for assisting park rangers and staff with the man's rescue.

"Thank you to the amazing members of the public who assisted Park Rangers, NT Police and NT Ambulance staff with a major rescue operation on Uluru this afternoon."

News of the man's heart attack has sparked outrage online with some critics saying tourists should never be allowed to climb the rock.

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Every year more than 400,000 tourists visit Uluru, with between 400 and 500 people climbing it every day.

News of the man's heart attack has sparked outrage in some people, saying no one should be allowed to climb the rock.

News of the man's heart attack has sparked outrage in some people, saying no one should be allowed to climb the rock.

News of the man's heart attack has sparked outrage in some people, saying no one should be allowed to climb the rock.

Climbing Uluru is a contentious issue if it's a sacred site for Indigenous Australians, and touching it is considered disrespectful to the Anangu people

Climbing Uluru is a contentious issue as it is a sacred site for Indigenous Australians, and touching it is considered disrespectful to the Anangu people

Climbing Uluru is a contentious issue as it is a sacred site for Indigenous Australians, and touching it is considered disrespectful to the Anangu people

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Climbing Uluru is a contentious issue as it is a sacred site for Indigenous Australians, and touching it is considered disrespectful to the Anangu people.

It's also not entirely safe to climb, with 30 people trying to reach its 860 meter summit.

'Glad the man is OK …. but shouldn't have been there in the first place. No respect, "one comment read.

It's also not entirely safe to climb, with 30 people trying to reach its 860 meter summit

It's also not entirely safe to climb, with 30 people trying to reach its 860 meter summit

It's also not entirely safe to climb, with 30 people trying to reach its 860 meter summit

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'How come they are climbing Uluru anyway !!! It's not closed in October. Very, Very disrespectful climbing the Rock anyway. Karma, read another.

'Why on earth are people still allowed to climb this rock? It was my understanding that sanity had prevailed and all climbing was prohibited, "one woman wrote.

Tourists will no longer be able to climb Uluru after October 26, after the national park board's 2017 decision to close the climb.

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