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Security assessments by Australian intelligence services have led to recommending jihadists and their families returning to Australia is the best option for the country

Security assessments by intelligence services, including ASIO, have led to recommendations for Australian jihadists and their families who have fled to the ISIS area to return home.

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The intelligence sector told the federal government earlier this year that jihadists are less of a threat to Australia if they are detained or monitored by surveillance in the country, The Daily Telegraph reported.

NSW Counter-terrorism minister Anthony Roberts chose not to talk about the specific details of the recommendations, but said he agreed to the calls to bring jihadists home.

# It is in our interest to really have those people in custody rather than overseas, frankly, it is in our own interest to have them here in Australia where they can be monitored or detained and are supervised, & # 39; he said.

Security assessments by Australian intelligence services have led to recommending jihadists and their families returning to Australia is the best option for the country

Security assessments by Australian intelligence services have led to recommending jihadists and their families returning to Australia is the best option for the country

& # 39; These are the days when you can in principle give a person abroad instructions and orders to people here, send them information about performing extremist actions, and it is better for us to have them here where they are is either in a facility or guards. & # 39;

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Currently, hunters from 14 years of age can be blocked from returning to Australia for up to two years if they pose a threat to the community.

But a high intelligence operator confirmed the publication that the intelligence sector wanted to immediately bring the jihadists and their families home.

& # 39; The feeling of our intelligence services, both here and abroad, is that we actually want these people back, better to get them back from war zones and to place them in a controlled environment & # 39 ;, said the intelligence service.

A total of 230 Australians traveled to Syria or Iraq during ISIS & # 39; s terror and 95 of them were reportedly killed during combat actions.

The authorities are currently in direct communication with five of those Australians who have joined ISIS abroad and are looking for a path home.

The recommendation was passed on to the government after the intelligence sector had carried out an evaluation of potential jihadist returnees.

The revelation came only a few days after it was reported that orphaned children of a Muslim state hunter detained in a Syrian refugee camp could soon be returned to Australia.

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The three children, aged between six and twelve, were brought from Australia to Syria when their parents Yasin Rizvic and Fauzia Khamal Bacha joined the terrorist group in 2014.

Rizvic, from Bosnia, was a leading figure in the Al-Furqan Islamic Center in Melbourne – often linked to radical extremism before it was closed in 2015.

Currently, jihadists over the age of 14 can be blocked to get a passport to return to Australia for up to two years if they pose a threat to the community, but there is a push to get jihadists and their families back home

Currently, jihadists over the age of 14 can be blocked to get a passport to return to Australia for up to two years if they pose a threat to the community, but there is a push to get jihadists and their families back home

Currently, jihadists over the age of 14 can be blocked to get a passport to return to Australia for up to two years if they pose a threat to the community, but there is a push to get jihadists and their families back home

Australians beg to come home after fighting with ISIS

Oliver Bridgeman, 21

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.
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Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

Olive Bridgeman, 21, (photo) claims he went to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.

  • The 21-year-old from Toowoomba in Queensland & Darling Downs claimed that he had traveled to Syria to be a humanitarian aid worker.
  • He previously assured his mother and father that he had not fought in the war-torn country, where ISIS terrorists are fighting for control.
  • His passport has been canceled by the Australian government and he has been stuck in the war-torn area since 2016.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26,

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

Mahir Absar Alam, 26, (photo), was caught just outside Baghouz.

  • Alam joined the Islamic State just four weeks after it proclaimed its so-called Caliphate in 2014.
  • He reportedly expressed his regret for his participation.
  • The 26-year-old faces spend time in a prison camp in Syria and can be brought to Iraq for trial or possibly deported to Australia, where he can be prosecuted.
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Ahmed Merhi, 27

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

Ahmed Merhi, 27, (photo) has begged Australia to help him escape.

  • The Sydney terrorist, Ahmed Merhi, has begged Australia to help him after he was sentenced to death by being stuck in Iraq.
  • The former student of the Granville Boys High School, from the west of Sydney, traveled to Syria in 2014 or 2015.
  • He claimed at the time that he was traveling to the war-torn area to provide assistance.

Janai Safar, 24

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

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Janai Safar, 24, (photo), has previously vowed never to return to Australia.

  • Safar lives in a refugee camp in northern Syria after his defeat.
  • She left Australia to allegedly become a member of the jihadist terror group in 2015.
  • She previously promised that she would never return to Australia.
  • & # 39; It was my decision to go here to leave naked women in the street. I don't want my son being brought up there, & she said.

Zehra Duman, 24,

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

Zehra Duman, 24, (photo) hit the headlines in Australia when she fled to Syria in 2014.

  • Duman, from Melbourne, is believed to be held at the al-Hawl refugee camp in Syria with her two-year-old son and six-month-old daughter.
  • She claims that she has been trying to leave ISIS for two years.
  • The 24-year-old said she knew Australians would be angry with her, but emphasized: & My children have the right to be treated as normal children. & # 39;

Khaled Sharrouf & # 39; s children: Zaynab, 17, Hoda, 16, and Humzeh, eight

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

Zaynab (top left), Hoda (top right) and Humzeh (bottom, center) are in the al-Howl camp.

  • The remaining three children of the Australian terrorist have been detained since mid-March in al-Hawl refugee camp in northeastern Syria.
  • Their mother, Tara Nettleton, who lives in Sydney, smuggled the children from Australia after her husband left to join the Caliphate.
  • Nettleton would have died in 2016, while Sharrouf and his two oldest sons would have been killed in 2017 in an air raid.

He died while fighting for the terrorist group in 2016. Bacha also died later, but the circumstances surrounding her death are unknown.

The young children have been stranded in Al-Hawl refugee camp in western Syria controlled by the Kurdish government since their parents were killed, ABC reported.

The Australian has reported that three children, presumably of Bosnian descent, would probably be the first children from the war to return home.

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It is unclear whether the aforementioned orphans are the children of Rizvic.

The Australian authorities reportedly worked on moving the children to Lebanon or Iraq, where they would meet an Australian consular officer before they were transferred to Melbourne.

Peter Dutton, Secretary of the Interior, said the children should not suffer, but firmly expressed the government's view that no Australian official would be jeopardized to release them from a conflict area.

& # 39; When it comes to children, we treat every case on its merits, but in each case we place the safety of Australians at the top of the list. & # 39;

The children beg for help to return to Australia, but Prime Minister Scott Morrison has said that national security was his first priority.

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Zaynab, 17, Hoda, 16, and Humzeh, 8, were brought to Syria by their parents, who have since died.

Zaynab now has two toddler daughters and is heavily pregnant with a third child.

The remaining three orphaned children (photos & # 39; s) of infamous terrorist Khaled Sharrouf could be back on Australian soil in a few weeks (Zaynab, top left; Hoda, top right; Humzeh, bottom) Abdullah, bottom right and Zarqawi, bottom left, both became killed)

The remaining three orphaned children (photos & # 39; s) of infamous terrorist Khaled Sharrouf could be back on Australian soil in a few weeks (Zaynab, top left; Hoda, top right; Humzeh, bottom) Abdullah, bottom right and Zarqawi, bottom left, both became killed)

The remaining three orphaned children (photos & # 39; s) of infamous terrorist Khaled Sharrouf could be back on Australian soil in a few weeks (Zaynab, top left; Hoda, top right; Humzeh, bottom) Abdullah, bottom right and Zarqawi, bottom left, both became killed)

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