Australian influencers receive fines of up to $ 220,000 on sponsored messages

Social media influencers throughout Australia are forced to get real jobs after Instagram last week the & # 39; like counter & # 39; has controversially deleted.

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And while engagement levels are falling across the country, crackdown on sponsored messaging rules could see some influencers fined up to $ 220,000.

Without the knowledge of many Instagram models, there are actually strict rules for sharing brand content with fans.

Influencers can receive & # 39; fines up to $ 220,000 for not correctly reporting sponsored messages & # 39; if they are being prosecuted by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Pictured: Sophie Tieman, who meets the legal requirements in her functions

Influencers can receive & # 39; fines up to $ 220,000 for not correctly reporting sponsored messages & # 39; if they are being prosecuted by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Pictured: Sophie Tieman, who meets the legal requirements in her functions

In 2017 a new code on social media influencers was introduced by the Australian Association of National Advertisers (AANA).

According to Triple J Hack, The code states that influencers must label clearly sponsored messages & # 39; or be fined.

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The & # 39; real danger & # 39; for social media users not reporting sponsored messages, prosecution by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission for violation of Australian Consumer Law (ACL).

Violating the ACL brings a maximum fine of $ 220,000 per mail for an influencer and $ 1.1 million for a brand.

Responsible Posting: According to an earlier ABC report, violating Australian Consumer Law (ACL) can have huge financial implications. Pictured: Sophie Tieman, who met the legal requirements in this advertisement

Responsible Posting: According to an earlier ABC report, violating Australian Consumer Law (ACL) can have huge financial implications. Pictured: Sophie Tieman, who met the legal requirements in this advertisement

Responsible Posting: According to an earlier ABC report, violating Australian Consumer Law (ACL) can have huge financial implications. Pictured: Sophie Tieman, who met the legal requirements in this advertisement

Au: The publication claimed in 2017 that & # 39; violating the ACL would result in a maximum fine of $ 220,000 per item for an influencer and $ 1.1 million for a brand & # 39 ;. Pictured: Brittany Hockley, who also meets the legal requirements

Au: The publication claimed in 2017 that & # 39; violating the ACL would result in a maximum fine of $ 220,000 per item for an influencer and $ 1.1 million for a brand & # 39 ;. Pictured: Brittany Hockley, who also meets the legal requirements

Au: The publication claimed in 2017 that & # 39; violating the ACL would result in a maximum fine of $ 220,000 per item for an influencer and $ 1.1 million for a brand & # 39 ;. Pictured: Brittany Hockley, who also meets the legal requirements

While most influencers are reluctant to courageously state when they are being paid for a particular job, there are more subtle ways to advertise.

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Many users just take the hashtags & # 39; sp & # 39; or & # 39; ad & # 39; somewhere in their long captions, which correctly indicates that it is a & # 39; sponsored & # 39; post or & # 39; advertisement & # 39; is.

However, not all influencers do this, which means that they may be liable if they are investigated amid recent changes on Instagram and the discussion about influencers.

At present, no influencer has been prosecuted in Australia for not reporting an advertisement.

To comply with the regulations, influencers such as Marules At First Sight & Jules Robinson and Cameron Merchant (photo) influence the & # 39; ad & # 39; (circled) or & # 39; spun & # 39; to explain the ad

To comply with the regulations, influencers such as Marules At First Sight & Jules Robinson and Cameron Merchant (photo) influence the & # 39; ad & # 39; (circled) or & # 39; spun & # 39; to explain the ad

To comply with the regulations, influencers such as Marules At First Sight & Jules Robinson and Cameron Merchant (photo) influence the & # 39; ad & # 39; (circled) or & # 39; spun & # 39; to explain the ad

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According to ACL, a & # 39; person, person, or company should not exhibit behavior that will mislead or mislead other people & # 39 ;, wrote Legal vision in 2016.

& # 39; Therefore, the ACL may consider flu marketing to be misleading under its provisions if the flu does not disclose that they are receiving compensation. & # 39;

In October, Advertising Standards wrote: & # 39; There are no rules in Australia that require you to use #ad or #spon. However, the AANA recommends using it for paid messages, as it is a simple way to ensure that your followers can distinguish it as advertisements. & # 39;

No matter how an influencer declares a paid for approval, the most important rule is that he & # 39; must ensure that the advertisement is distinguishable & # 39; for followers.

Following the rules: no matter how an influencer declares a paid for approval, the most important rule is that he & # 39; must ensure that the advertisement is distinguishable & # 39; for followers. Pictured: Jules and Cam

Following the rules: no matter how an influencer declares a paid for approval, the most important rule is that he & # 39; must ensure that the advertisement is distinguishable & # 39; for followers. Pictured: Jules and Cam

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Following the rules: no matter how an influencer declares a paid for approval, the most important rule is that he & # 39; must ensure that the advertisement is distinguishable & # 39; for followers. Pictured: Jules and Cam

To make it clear: the Bachelor & # 39; s Brittany Hockley announced her & # 39; s advertisement & # 39; for Woolworths

To make it clear: the Bachelor & # 39; s Brittany Hockley announced her & # 39; s advertisement & # 39; for Woolworths

To make it clear: the Bachelor & # 39; s Brittany Hockley announced her & # 39; s advertisement & # 39; for Woolworths

Since finding fame on Married At First Sight, Jules Robinson and Cameron Merchant are two leading Australian stars who perfectly follow the guidelines.

She hashtag & # 39; ad & # 39; or & # 39; sp & # 39; often at the end of captions about paid promotions to their combined 468,000 followers.

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The Bachelor's Brittany Hockley and Sophie Tieman also do this at their posts, after they have recently approved Woolworths and a hair care program.

Indicated: The bachelor Sophie Tieman also follows the guidelines on her Instagram

Indicated: The bachelor Sophie Tieman also follows the guidelines on her Instagram

Indicated: The bachelor Sophie Tieman also follows the guidelines on her Instagram

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