Australian farmer reveals she’s learned to live with the ‘rotten’ smell of dead mice

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An Australian farmer whose home has been infested by a mouse infestation has said she has learned to live with the ‘rotten’ smell of rotting rodents after picking up ‘buckets’ from them every day.

Rural areas in eastern Australia have been infested by thousands of mice after an abundance of rain and massive harvests in March created ideal conditions for the mice to breed.

Anne Cullen, of Coonamble, New South Wales, has spent up to $40,000 to exterminate the rodents in her home after discovering some of them had infested her property.

When she appeared on This Morning today, she described the situation as a “nightmare” and said that although she does her best to get rid of the animals with poison, it is impossible to eradicate them because they breed so quickly. .

Farmer Anne Cullen (pictured) said on This Morning today that she has learned to live with the ‘rotten’ smell of rotting rodents since her New South Wales home was engulfed by a plague of mice that swam in eastern Australia

Rural areas in eastern Australia have been plagued by thousands of rodents after the massive crops created by the torrential rains in March created ideal conditions for the mice to breed.  Pictured, dead mice at a home in Coonamble

Rural areas in eastern Australia have been plagued by thousands of rodents after the massive crops created by the torrential rains in March created ideal conditions for the mice to breed. Pictured, dead mice at a home in Coonamble

“The smell is just absolutely off,” Anne said. “The funny thing is you get used to it, you have no choice, it’s downright disgusting.

“I went to pick up a bucket of dead mice every morning and throw them away, but there are so many under the house, so many around you that you can’t pick up and that’s the stench. The stench around my hay barn was pretty disgusting, but you have to get used to it.’

Anne was visiting her daughter when the mice invaded her house, and says she had no choice but to sleep among the rodent infestation — even when she woke up to one running through her hair.

She appeared on the ITV show today and described the situation as a 'nightmare' for hosts Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield

She appeared on the ITV show today and described the situation as a ‘nightmare’ for hosts Holly Willoughby and Phillip Schofield

The farmer said that although she does her best to get rid of the animals with poison, it is impossible to exterminate the rodents because they breed so quickly

The farmer said that although she does her best to get rid of the animals with poison, it is impossible to eradicate the rodents because they breed so quickly

“I came back to my house and turned on the light, it was dark and of course the mice all came out at night,” Anne said.

Horror mouse infestation sweeps eastern Australia as farmers’ crops are destroyed by rodents

Rural areas in eastern Australia have been infested by thousands of mice after an abundance of rain and massive harvests in March created ideal conditions for the mice to breed.

Countless farmers have destroyed crops, some losing as much as $300,000 in stock.

The shocking math behind the mouse life cycle is one of the main reasons why the mouse infestation sweeping the eastern states of Australia is so terrifying.

In just a few months, two mice can spawn a colony of hundreds of thousands — which could grow to millions in just over a year in perfect conditions.

“The mice were all over my bed, on the porch. They had eaten through a beanbag and so the beanbag was all over the floor. It was just a nightmare.

‘I thought to myself, ‘What the hell am I supposed to do?’ You can’t go to sleep in your car because they’re in your car – I had to find a bedroom that was a little safer, but that night I had mice running through my hair.”

Anne says she was “appalled” to see how many of the mice had taken over her hay barn, and that despite a handful of poison every day, she was unable to “make a dent” in the swarm.

“When I first went there in the evening and saw it, I was just stunned,” she said. “There were only thousands.

“Every night when I went there and handed out handfuls of mouse bait, I saw so many dead ones, but they were all still there. I did it for days and I thought “I’m not making a dent here”. It was only thousands and thousands.’

Despite setting out mouse bait, traps, and even setting up a steel wall, Anne says there’s no way to stop the mice from entering her house.

“You’re watching television and you see them running across the floor. My house is an old house,” said Anne. “I’ve managed to put a steel wall and a few doors in places you think they’ll come in, but you really can’t stop them.”

The rodents reproduce rapidly and breed at just six weeks of age and give birth to litters of as many as 10 offspring every 20 days.

The pests reproduce rapidly and breed at just six weeks of age, giving birth to litters as large as 10 offspring every 20 days.  Pictured, mice swathing in the New South Wales area of ​​Australia

The pests reproduce rapidly and breed at just six weeks of age, giving birth to litters as large as 10 offspring every 20 days. Pictured, mice swathing in the New South Wales area of ​​Australia

Not only houses have been affected. Anne says the smell of dead mice in local supermarkets, despite cleaning shops three times a day, is “just awful.”

“Where there is food, they will go,” she said. “The poor supermarkets have had to throw away so many tons of food and put everything in plastic containers, huge costs have been incurred for them.

“The stench is just awful and they have to clean because of health standards. They clean three times a day. It’s also a huge cost for supermarkets.”

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