Australian doctor says Australia will face ‘uncontrollable Covid outbreak’

How an Australian doctor’s Nostradamus moment predicted Australia would have an ‘uncontrollable Covid outbreak’ – and why vaccinating during the ‘break’ was our only hope

  • Doctor John Gerrard predicted in May that Covid-19 would spiral out of control
  • He Begged Government Officials To Use Dip In Cases To Vaccinate Everyone
  • Only 15 percent of people in NSW are fully vaccinated as the situation escalates
  • tthere are now 232 patients suffering from Covid-19 in NSW hospitals

dr.  John Gerrard (pictured) predicted Australia would have an outbreak like the one currently plaguing Sydney

dr. John Gerrard (pictured) predicted Australia would have an outbreak like the one currently plaguing Sydney

A top Australian doctor predicted that Covid-19 would spiral out of control in May in Down Under, saying that vaccinating the population when cases were low was our only hope of coming out of the pandemic unscathed.

Dr John Gerrard is Director of Infectious Diseases at Gold Coast University Hospital, treating Queensland’s first Covid patient at the start of the health crisis in early 2020.

He knew that the first recurrence of the virus was extremely contagious, and that was before the highly contagious Indian Delta strain mutated its way into existence.

New South Wales is now facing its worst outbreak since the pandemic began with a staggering 3,600 new cases in the past two months, and the deadly tension has since spread to Victoria and Queensland.

Just four months ago, when the country had hardly any Covid-19 cases, ABC program Four Corners filmed Dr. Gerrard who predicted the disease would soon cause another outbreak, similar to the one in Melbourne last year.

People are being tested for Covid-19 in Brisbane (pictured).  The latest outbreak is sweeping Sydney, Queensland and Melbourne

People are being tested for Covid-19 in Brisbane (pictured).  The latest outbreak is sweeping Sydney, Queensland and Melbourne

People are being tested for Covid-19 in Brisbane (pictured). The latest outbreak is sweeping Sydney, Queensland and Melbourne

“I have no doubt that this hospital will be used for the purpose for which it was designed sometime in the next 12 months,” he said.

“Once we get above a certain critical number, the virus spreads and we can no longer contain it.

“But we are in this fortunate position, this fortunate position when we have this calm, and this gives us the chance to vaccinate and protect the vulnerable for when the virus arrives.”

He said the period when there were no local cases was an “extraordinary gift” and begged government officials not to waste the opportunity – a warning that was largely ignored.

The Australian vaccine rollout has been hampered by conflicting health advice about the AstraZeneca injection and failure to obtain enough Pfizer in the early stages of the rollout.

New South Wales registered a further 207 cases of Covid-19 on Monday as Sydney continues to struggle with an outbreak of the highly contagious Delta strain

New South Wales registered a further 207 cases of Covid-19 on Monday as Sydney continues to struggle with an outbreak of the highly contagious Delta strain

New South Wales registered a further 207 cases of Covid-19 on Monday as Sydney continues to struggle with an outbreak of the highly contagious Delta strain

Residents queue up for their dose of Covid-19 coronavirus vaccine at Sydney's Homebush Vaccination Center on Aug. 2 (pictured), as doctors say jabs are the only way out of lockdown

Residents queue up for their dose of Covid-19 coronavirus vaccine at Sydney's Homebush Vaccination Center on Aug. 2 (pictured), as doctors say jabs are the only way out of lockdown

Residents queue up for their dose of Covid-19 coronavirus vaccine at Sydney’s Homebush Vaccination Center on Aug. 2 (pictured), as doctors say jabs are the only way out of lockdown

State and federal politicians couldn’t agree on whether or not to give AstraZeneca to people under 60 for fear of an extremely rare blood clotting disorder associated with the shot, but it was then decided to give it to anyone over the age of 18. to offer.

While the government tried to ensure that the elderly and vulnerable were first in line, it further hampered the rollout by preventing younger demographics from getting the shot.

An increasing number of people under the age of 40 are reported in daily numbers of cases in NSW, with many seriously ill hospitalized, but younger Australians still cannot enroll in Pfizer and are forced to get a letter from their doctor to get AstraZeneca .

Of the 207 new infections registered in NSW on Monday, Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said at least 50 were in the community while they were contagious.

An ambulance worker and staff can be seen at the entrance to the Hardi Aged Care Nursing Home Facility on Summer Hill on Aug. 2 (pictured), which has now seen 13 cases

An ambulance worker and staff can be seen at the entrance to the Hardi Aged Care Nursing Home Facility on Summer Hill on Aug. 2 (pictured), which has now seen 13 cases

An ambulance worker and staff can be seen at the entrance to the Hardi Aged Care Nursing Home Facility on Summer Hill on Aug. 2 (pictured), which has now seen 13 cases

There are now 232 patients suffering from Covid-19 in NSW hospitals – including 54 in intensive care and 25 on ventilators.

The NSW Prime Minister said the priority was to vaccinate the state’s ‘mobile’ residents between the ages of 20 and 40 – particularly in the eight local government areas to the west and south west of Sydney, where the virus is spreading fastest .

She said on Monday that health officials would need to get 9.2 million shots statewide to reach a 70 percent vaccination target, which she has repeatedly said would lead to an easing of lockdown restrictions.

“Vaccines are extremely effective,” she said. ‘We still don’t know anyone in intensive care’ [in NSW] who received both doses of the vaccine.

“We’re already at 3.9 million jabs. With five million jabs we are halfway through the target of 80 percent and with 9.2 million injections we are at 70 percent.’

NSW’s vaccination rate is about 15 percent for those who received both shots and 32 percent received only one dose.

Advertisement

.