Australian chefs share simple tricks for saving undercooked pasta if you’ve already added sauce

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Revealed: The Simple Tricks To Save Undercooked Pasta When You’ve Already Added Sauce

  • An easy trick to save undercooked pasta has been revealed by home cooks
  • It can be tenderized with a stock cube and water, even with the addition of sauce
  • Others suggested turning the dish into a pasta dish by covering it with cheese

Simple tricks for saving undercooked pasta when you’ve already added sauce have been revealed by Australian amateur chefs.

A woman posted in a Facebook cooking group asking members how to keep her spaghetti bolognese after smearing it with sauce before realizing it was still difficult.

Dozens responded that pasta can be made tender by adding a stock cube broken in water and boiling the mixture over low heat with the lid on until soft.

Others suggested turning the Bolognese into a pasta dish by topping with cheese and cooking at 180 degrees Celsius for 45 minutes.

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Australian amateur chefs say undercooked pasta can be tenderized by adding a stock cube broken in water, even if already coated with a sauce

Australian amateur chefs say undercooked pasta can be tenderized by adding a stock cube broken in water, even if already coated with a sauce

One woman said it should be enough to just add half a cup of water and let the pasta simmer for five to ten minutes.

A second suggested throwing the mixture into a slow cooker and frying it over high heat until fully cooked.

The tips have received high praise online, thanking many respondents for sharing such simple yet useful knowledge.

“It could be worse, I cooked bolognese last night, it tasted awful and no one was going to eat it – then I remembered I still had to go back and rinse the detergent off the bowl!” one woman wrote.

Nutritionist Jessica Sepel’s Healthy Chickpea Pasta Recipe

INGREDIENTS

125 g chickpea paste

½ cup of Napoletana sauce

Handful of basil leaves

2 tablespoons of ricotta

1 tablespoon of grated Parmesan cheese

½ tsp chili flakes, optional

Extra virgin olive oil

METHOD

1. Cook the pasta according to the instructions on the package.

2. Drain and mix the pasta with the Napoletana sauce.

3. Stir in basil leaves and top with ricotta, grated parmesan, chilli flakes (if using) and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

Season and serve.

Pasta recipes and revelations have hit the internet in recent months, from the viral TikTok pasta with feta cheese to the reason you can never find an expiration date on dried varieties at the supermarket.

Frequently asked questions on the website of San Remo, a company headquartered in Northeast Adelaide, SA, reveal that brands are not required to stamp “ best before ” dates on the packaging of products that have a two-year shelf life or longer.

But the answer hides in plain sight in a small code marked on the side of each package.

The code represents the production date of the pasta displayed in the Julian date format, where the first digit is the year and the last three is the day of that year.

The 'F0202' code stamped on the right side of this pasta box indicates the production date in the Julian year format, here 21 July 2020

The 'F0202' code stamped on the right side of this pasta box indicates the production date in the Julian year format, here 21 July 2020

The ‘F0202’ code stamped on the right side of this pasta box indicates the production date in the Julian year format, here 21 July 2020

For example, the code 8144 would be the 144th day of 2018 – that’s May 24, 2018 – while 0026 would be the 26th day of 2020, that’s January 26, 2020.

San Remo sometimes puts an ‘L’ or an ‘F’ in front of the code, but it is unclear what these letters represent.

The brand recommends using dried pasta within two years of production date, provided it is stored in a dry, airtight container.

Best before dates are stamped on the packaging of other leading pasta brands, including Barilla and La Molisana Pastificio.

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