Australian chef Danielle Alvaez reveals when to season meat so it tastes its best

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Top chef reveals the EXACT time to season meat, poultry and fish with salt to taste its best – and you’ll be surprised

  • An Australian top chef has shared her surprising secret for seasoning meat
  • Danielle Alvarez said large pieces should be salted up to two days before cooking
  • This applies to things like thick steaks, lamb shoulder and whole chickens
  • The chef at Fred’s in Paddington said fish requires a different approach?
  • She said it should be salted 10 minutes before cooking to prevent the skin from hardening

A top Australian chef has revealed her surprising secret to seasoning meat and poultry to perfection – and why fish and vegetables require a completely different approach.

Danielle Alvarez, executive chef at Fred’s in Paddington, Sydney, said thick cuts of steak, lamb shoulder and whole chickens should be salted up to two days before cooking and then kept covered in the fridge until ready to use.

Ms. Alvarez said: Good food Australia that seasoning days in advance makes the meat sweeter, juicier and infinitely more tender than during cooking.

She said fish is “delicate” and should only be salted 10 to 15 minutes beforehand to prevent the skin from becoming tough.

A top Australian chef says thick cuts of steak, lamb shoulder and whole chickens should be salted up to two days before cooking (stock image)

A Chef’s Guide to Perfect Seasoning

Steak, lamb and pork: Salt up to two days in advance, cover and refrigerate until needed.

Whole chickens: Salt up to two days in advance, cover and refrigerate until needed.

Fish: Salt 10 to 15 minutes before cooking.

Vegetables: Generously salted pots of boiling water that will be used for cooking – do not season vegetables yourself.

Source: Danielle Alvarez

Danielle Alvarez, Chef at Fred's in Paddington, Sydney

Danielle Alvarez, Chef at Fred’s in Paddington, Sydney

And when it comes to vegetables, Ms. Alvarez said she adds flavor by liberally salting pots of boiling water instead of seasoning the vegetables themselves.

“Even if you can’t salt meat the day before, some time is better than no time,” she said

“If you only have an hour or two, salt the meat and leave it at room temperature, as cold temperatures hinder the salt from doing its job.”

The cookbook author, who has nearly 15 years of experience in some of the world’s finest cuisines, including four at the legendary Chez Panisse in Berkeley, California, said that waiting with the season until food is fully cooked can make it “bland and salty.” to make.

Ms. Alvarez said seasoning at the right time also reduces the amount of salt needed to pack a tasty punch, making dishes healthier.

She said it’s also important to be critical of the type of salt you use.

Ms. Alvarez's favorite seasoning is sea salt, as it gives food the 'cleanest, most natural' flavor (stock image)

Ms. Alvarez’s favorite seasoning is sea salt, as it gives food the ‘cleanest, most natural’ flavor (stock image)

Her favorite seasoning is sea salt because it gives food the ‘cleanest, most natural’ taste.

You should also consider how much salt you use, according to Ms. Alvarez.

She said it’s a good rule of thumb to use about one percent of the total weight of whatever you’re cooking.

Ms. Alvarez said it is crucial to season with just enough salt, as too little makes food tasteless and bland, while too much makes it inedible.

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