Australia warned it will become a ‘nation of morons’ as Education Minister denounces new curriculum

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Australia is warned it will become a ‘nation of idiots’ as Education Minister criticizes school table curriculum at age 9 and ‘unbalanced’ indigenous history

  • Alan Tudge said it was good to put more emphasis on indigenous history
  • However, he expressed concern that the design did not strike the right balance
  • Mr. Tudge also condemned a proposal to teach rosters at an older age

Australia’s Minister of Education has expressed concern about proposed changes to the national curriculum that focus too heavily on Indigenous history at the expense of Western culture.

Under design changes, students would learn how European colonization was perceived by indigenous people as an invasion, which critics said ran the risk of turning Australia into a ‘nation of morons’.

Education Minister Alan Tudge said it was good to place more emphasis on indigenous history, but expressed concern that the design could not strike the right balance.

Mr. Tudge did acknowledge that it is “particularly gratifying” to see the math standards being lifted in the draft, but he turned down a proposal to teach rosters at an older age.

“We must honor our indigenous history and teach it well,” the federal education minister told Sky News.

Nor should that be at the expense of dishonoring our Western heritage that made us the liberal democracy we are today.

‘We have to find the right balance and I am afraid that we are not in the design that has been released.’

Professor Kenneth Wiltshire, a professor at the University of Queensland, condemned the proposed changes and said the responsible body should be abolished.

‘We will create a nation of idiots inundated in a world where they have no understanding of the history of civilization, human thought, human philosophy, values ​​or principles that have produced lessons that must be recognized by all societies’, he said. The Australian.

“Not pressing any amount of swipe screens or buttons to bring up unfounded internet input will compensate for this.”

Mr Tudge said a curriculum with more emphasis on Indigenous history would be a ‘positive development’ but warned that it should not come at the expense of teaching and not at the expense of teaching ‘classical and Western civilizations and what Australia is like a free, liberal democracy emerge.

Both are important to a rich understanding of our nation’s history. There is more work to be done in this area, ‘he said.

Mr. Tudge fears that language as ‘invasion’ could turn students into activists.

Under design changes, students would learn how the British colonization of Australia was perceived by the indigenous people as an invasion

Under design changes, students would learn how the British colonization of Australia was perceived by the indigenous people as an invasion

‘Certainly some people from an indigenous perspective saw things very, very differently than the white settlers saw it (sic) and that should be learned too,’ he said.

Mr. Tudge admitted that it is “very gratifying” to see the math standards in the draft being lifted, but he declined a proposal to teach rosters at an older age.

“I am perplexed why some basic concepts, such as tables, are being shifted from year 3 to year 4, as this goes against the general trend,” he said.

Education ministers from across the country will discuss the design at a meeting in Melbourne on Friday.

The proposed changes will be open to public feedback before the Australian Curriculum, Review and Reporting Authority hands over a final draft to ministers later this year.

Federal Education Minister Alan Tudge said it was good to place more emphasis on indigenous history, but expressed concern that the design was not striking the right balance.

Federal Education Minister Alan Tudge said it was good to place more emphasis on indigenous history, but expressed concern that the design was not striking the right balance.

“I’ll look for changes from what I’ve seen so far,” said Mr Tudge.

A review of the existing curriculum found that outdated ideas contradicted indigenous calls for truth-telling.

It also found that there was too much emphasis on indigenous history before Europeans arrived.

ACARA CEO David de Carvalho said students should learn the perspectives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

“It is important that all Australian students have the opportunity to discuss these important issues and understand these core concepts,” he told SBS News.

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