Aussie ‘sovereign citizen’ tries to talk his way out of a traffic stop with an irate cop

Self-proclaimed ‘King of Australia’ made extreme social media posts calling for the police to be hanged – with police fearing he would strike again

  • A ‘Sovereign Citizen’ Incarcerated On Firearm Charges Is Released
  • Juha Kiskonen is leader of the conspiracy-driven United Kingdom of Australia
  • NSW Supreme Court heard Kiskonen calling for police to hang

The leader of a bizarre movement that believes the government is illegitimate has called for the ‘hanging’ of the police and says capital letters make a person a ‘corporate shell’ will be released from prison this week.

‘Sovereign citizen’ Juha Kiskonen was found guilty last year of two counts of using a carriage service to threaten or harass and two counts of possessing an unregistered firearm and given 12 months behind bars.

Police discovered the illegal weapon when officers from the NSW Fixated Persons Unit raided south-west Sydney as part of an investigation into the leader of the United Kingdom of Australia.

But while Kiskonen will walk free, NSW prosecutors have requested an extended oversight, fearing his ideology could lead him to carry out “politically motivated violence.”

‘Sovereign citizen’ Juha Kiskonen (pictured) was found guilty last year of two counts of using a carriage service to threaten or harass and two counts of possessing an unregistered firearm and given 12 months behind bars

What is a Sovereign Citizen?

Today’s sovereign belief system is based on a decades-old conspiracy theory.

Sovereign citizens believe that they – not judges, juries, law enforcement or elected officials – should decide which laws to obey and which to ignore.

Most sovereign citizens also don’t think they should pay taxes.

As part of the strange ideology, Sovereigns believe that the law of the sea should be used to rule – even on land.

They also believe that capital letters are used on birth certificates to make individuals a legal entity, not a sovereign.

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center (US)

The wider sovereign civil conspiracy movement rejects the enforcement of all laws and taxes and considers them illegal.

Kiskonen’s United Kingdom of Australia group recognizes an Australia-based ‘king’ as the true head of state, insisting that only maritime law applies to individuals – even on dry land.

The NSW Supreme Court heard Wednesday that Kiskonen’s YouTube rants had described police and politicians as “traitors” and called for law enforcement officers to be hanged. news.com reported.

“The threat is that if the police continue to carry out their duties now, they will be hanged at some point in the future, either by a military tribunal or under the direction or authority of the king,” prosecutor James Emmett said. . .

“Those threats, according to the plaintiff, meet the definition of a terrorist act because they threaten an act that results in death.”

In a specific example put forward by Mr. Emmett, a person on Facebook asked if Kiskonen wanted to “kill a man because he disagrees with your claims.”

Kiskonen responded by saying, “You have a soft spot for traitors.”

Kiskonen's (pictured) United Kingdom of Australia group recognizes an Australia-based 'king' as the true head of state and only insists that only maritime law applies to individuals - even on dry land.

Kiskonen’s (pictured) United Kingdom of Australia group recognizes an Australia-based ‘king’ as the true head of state and only insists that only maritime law applies to individuals – even on dry land.

Before being arrested by police in July last year, Kiskonen planned a demonstration in Sydney’s Hyde Park, where his crew of conspiracy theorists planned to raise the ‘real’ Australian flag – the red maritime flag.

Kiskonen’s attorney Matthew Johnston argued that the court order should be dismissed, mocking the notion that his client should be considered a terrorism risk.

Pictured: 'Sovereign Citizen' Juha Kiskonen

Pictured: ‘Sovereign Citizen’ Juha Kiskonen

He told the court that Kiskonen had been diagnosed with schizophrenia 25 years ago and that it would not be appropriate to track all his movements by equipping him with electronic monitoring equipment, given his mental health problems.

Mr Johnston said his client has shown dramatic improvement since he began psychological treatment and is now disproving many of his long-held conspiracy beliefs.

He also argued that Kiskonen’s videos and social media posts do not violate guidelines and pose no serious risk of violent incitement.

‘That material is still available to like-minded people. We say this significantly reduces what is termed a risk problem,’ Mr Johnston.

Judge Julia Lonergan will rule on the case next week.

Advertisement

.