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Aussie farmer’s brutal message to Coles and Woolworths

A farmer has lashed out at major Australian supermarkets for ‘inflating’ the prices of some fruits and vegetables when buying them at a fraction of the price.

A cherry and apple farmer from Orange, in central NSW, Guy Gaeta, is at a loss at the huge prices on the shelves for produce he claims are not flowing back to the farmers.

He said he goes to the supermarket every week to see how much customers have to pay and is shocked to see such high prices.

Mr Gaeta said farmers would sell a head of lettuce to retailers for about $2, but recently the vegetable has been seen on supermarket shelves with a price tag of up to $12.

‘It’s bad for the farmers, but even worse for the consumers.’

Cherries can be sold for $5 a kilo, but once they hit the shelves, the price rises to about $15, Mr Gaeta said adding the price of cucumbers has also tripled.

Another farmer said he only sells his apples for $2 per pound, so they then cost $10.99 in stores.

“If farmers got $10 for a lettuce, we’d drive Ferraris,” Gaeta . said 2GB

A farmer lashes out at major Australian supermarkets for

A farmer lashes out at major Australian supermarkets for “inflating” the prices of fruits and vegetables while buying them at a fraction of the price (shown is a lettuce with a price tag of $11.99)

“Farmers don’t come close to that price (seen in supermarkets), they are being manipulated … it’s pretty brutal.”

He said the situation was “rotten” for farmers, but even worse for consumers.

“Nobody’s doing anything about it… with the cost of living and inflation, when will it end?” he said.

Mr Gaeta denied that the skyrocketing cost of gasoline was to blame, saying farmers supplied the produce to supermarket distribution centers themselves.

“Farmers deliver the produce to the supermarket’s distribution center, so the only expense they have is statewide distribution.

‘We bear most of the costs. Yes, they also have costs, but we (the farmers) do not add 80 percent to the price we agree on.

“We are talking about essential food, we all know that we all need fruits and vegetables, it is very important for our well-being, consumers are being scammed.

“There’s nothing worse than when a farmer gets $5 a pound for cherries and they see it in the grocery stores for $15, $16 — I don’t think it’s fair,” he added.

A NSW farmer has claimed that large supermarkets are selling fruit and vegetables for more than three times the amount they pay for them (stock image)

A NSW farmer has claimed that large supermarkets are selling fruit and vegetables for more than three times the amount they pay for them (stock image)

The farmer said he now refuses to supply the major supermarkets, but many in his industry did not have that option.

“If we don’t say no to them, we’ll probably have to throw the products away,” said Mr Gaeta.

“Unless we say it’s enough, the consumer is just going to pay more and more and if you pay more, you don’t buy as much and that means you have to lower your price.

“It’s one situation after another.”

National Farmers’ Federation economist Ash Salardini previously said there are many factors contributing to high product prices, such as food and staff shortages, as well as the rise in freight costs.

Coles and Woolworths have denied the allegations of price gouging.

A Woolworths spokesperson told the Daily Mail Australia: ‘We pay the market price for fresh fruit and vegetables, which is influenced by factors such as weather, seasonality, supply and demand.

“There are a number of fresh produce categories with reduced supply due to the flooding on the east coast and the recent rain and cold temperatures, and as a result we are paying more to our suppliers. These include lettuce and other leafy greens, zucchini, bell peppers, green beans, and strawberries.

“Many other categories, such as apples, pears, citrus and avocados, have not faced the same challenges and are still readily available. We pass on the great value of this seasonal fruit to our customers in the store.

‘We operate in a very competitive market and are always trying to find the right balance, so that suppliers receive a fair market price and our customers have access to high-quality and affordable fresh products.’

Coles announced Tuesday that those in southeastern Queensland will be able to buy two smaller lettuces for $6.50, as demand for the vegetable has suffered from recent flooding.

A supermarket spokesman said the weather conditions had affected the supply of products.

“Following the devastating floods in northern NSW and Queensland earlier this year, continued heavy rains along with recent cold weather and lower levels of sunlight have impacted supplies of berries, lettuce, beans, tomatoes, broccoli and herbs,” said a reporter. spokesman.

“The price of the product depends on the supply, but once volumes recover, we will do everything we can to bring the prices down for our customers as quickly as possible.

“Nevertheless, thanks to the extraordinary efforts of our growers, our customers can expect improved stocks from many fresh produce lines in the coming weeks.”

It comes just as Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe warned that inflation could hit a staggering 7 percent by the end of the year.

The RBA chief said inflation was expected to hit 6 percent this year, but that number has risen.

Speaking with the US Chamber of Commerce in Australia on Tuesday, Mr Lowe said they were bracing for the 7 percent peak expected to be reached in December, adding that it a ‘few years’ before inflation returned to normal levels.

It is currently 5.1 percent.

Cherries were also part of the price hike, with some supermarkets charging up to three times what the farmers are selling them (pictured, tubs of cherries from the Cherry Hill Orchards in Victoria)

Cherries were also part of the price hike, with some supermarkets charging up to three times what the farmers are selling them (pictured, tubs of cherries from the Cherry Hill Orchards in Victoria)

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