Home Australia Aussie billionaire Gerry Harvey rips into the Albanese government with foul-mouthed takedown of the Budget: ‘Just playing politics’

Aussie billionaire Gerry Harvey rips into the Albanese government with foul-mouthed takedown of the Budget: ‘Just playing politics’

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Billionaire Gerry Harvey (pictured) has joined the chorus of voices criticizing politicians for using the budget to play politics rather than providing any relief to Australians.

Billionaire Gerry Harvey has joined the chorus of voices accusing the Albanian government of using the budget to play politics instead of helping Australians.

The Harvey Norman co-founder, 84, revealed his disappointment at the way politicians are handling the economy as a growing number of voters threaten to boycott the Labor Party at the next election over the “irresponsible” budget.

“You have to realize that there is a lot of nonsense in this world and you have to take it with a grain of salt.” It doesn’t matter what party you’re talking about: they’re just playing politics,” Mr Harvey told the Herald of the sun.

“We operate in eight different countries, the only other country in the world that is as bad as Australia is New Zealand.”

Billionaire Gerry Harvey (pictured) has joined the chorus of voices criticizing politicians for using the budget to play politics rather than providing any relief to Australians.

The Harvey Norman co-founder has revealed his disappointment with Australian politicians as voters threaten to boycott the Labor Party in the upcoming budget election.

The Harvey Norman co-founder has revealed his disappointment with Australian politicians as voters threaten to boycott the Labor Party in the upcoming budget election.

The Federal Budget, released on Tuesday night by Treasurer Jim Chalmers, promised every Australian household a one-off payment of $300 towards their energy bills.

One million small businesses will also receive $325 off their bills.

Harvey said his energy bills had doubled in the past two years, but said he doubted the budget would make much of a difference.

“The budget won’t make a big difference because we’re playing politics,” he said.

‘When I look at what it costs me now to run my warehouses compared to a couple of years ago, it’s 100 per cent more. “Anything being done at the moment in terms of development costs is very high and the government is doing nothing to reduce them.”

While the $300 payment will come as a relief to some households, wealthier Australians have questioned why they are being offered extra money they don’t need.

“A flat $300 energy aid payment is a lazy and reckless policy,” wrote one online voter.

“Wealthy Australians don’t need it, and many struggling Australians need much more.”

‘Why is everyone getting a $300 energy rebate?’ There are some people who are really struggling right now, while others are doing very well,” said another.

A third wrote: “I’m sure Gina Rinehart is thrilled to get $300 back on her energy bills.”

An angry Australian called the Prime Minister directly and told him the money would have been better spent helping solve the housing crisis.

‘Hi Anthony Albanese, thanks for saving $300 on my energy bill. “The only problem is I don’t have a bloody energy bill because I can’t afford to live anywhere.”

Dr. Jim Chalmers is applauded by his colleagues after approving the Budget

Dr. Jim Chalmers is applauded by his colleagues after approving the Budget

Dr Chalmers was congratulated by Prime Minister Anthony Albanese

Dr Chalmers was congratulated by Prime Minister Anthony Albanese

Other cost-of-living relief outlined in the Budget included increased rental assistance and a $3 billion waiver on student debt indexation.

The new relief comes on top of the Stage Three tax reduction changes announced in January. The average household will receive an annual tax cut of $1,888, or $36 per week.

Dr Chalmers said the measures would ease pressure on households without exacerbating rising inflation.

“While many Australians remain under pressure, our economy is better placed than most to meet these challenges,” he said.

‘This government’s responsible economic management has helped alleviate inflationary and budgetary pressures.

“Although inflation remains too high, it is now less than half of its peak and almost half of what it was in mid-2022.”

However, some experts are skeptical that the measures will not affect inflation.

Independent economist Chris Richardson wrote: ‘My big ask of the Budget was not to poke the inflation bear. I don’t think I passed that test.

‘The government said it would be careful not to front-load its new costs, but that’s exactly what it did, and its new dollars are big and fast.

“Next year they will be eight times larger than in 2027-28, so this Budget narrows the Reserve Bank’s already narrow path.”

Experts were skeptical that Labor's cost-of-living relief measures would not impact inflation.

Experts were skeptical that Labor’s cost-of-living relief measures would not impact inflation.

Dr. Jim Chalmers

Sarah Ferguson, ABC 7.30 presenter

ABC host grills Treasurer over controversial $300 energy payment

Dr Chalmers was later questioned by ABC 7.30 presenter Sarah Ferguson about the inflationary risks of his budget and the controversial $300 energy rebate.

Ms Ferguson asked: ‘There are plenty of people outside of central Australia, like you, who don’t need help paying their bills.

‘Why do you need to give those people energy relief?’

Dr Chalmers responded: ‘I think these cost of living pressures go up and down the income scale.

“We have found a responsible and affordable, but meaningful way to help people with the cost of living, not just people on low and fixed incomes, but also people in central Australia.”

Labor welcomed the Budget surplus of around $9.3 billion, but that figure will be slashed to a deficit of $122 billion over four years to 2028.

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