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At least 70% of Americans will experience temperatures above 90F on the first day of summer

At least 70 percent of Americans will experience a severe heat wave that will see temperatures rise above 90F and reach even triple digits in parts of the Gulf Coast, Great Lakes and Midwest on the official first day of summer. .

Chicago, Minneapolis, Nashville, Memphis, Dallas, New Orleans and Atlanta are some of the cities with extreme heat warnings, with temperatures expected to exceed 100F, affecting 20 percent of the US population – 67.9 million people .

Minneapolis and St. Louis in Minnesota saw local weather reach about 101F (38C) on Monday, accompanied by high humidity that left conditions feeling close to 110F (43C).

The Twin Cities are seeing their roads collapse under the heat, and two areas on I-35 near Minneapolis are now closed, according to Kare11

‘MSP just reached 99′[F], which is a new daily record (surpassing the old record of 98 from 1933)! Let’s see if we get to 100,” the National Weather Service Twin Cities tweeted Monday. The heat index in the area peaked at 105F that day.

As of Monday at 5 p.m., when temperatures are highest, the weather in Minneapolis will be 89F, while Chicago will bear the brunt of 93F weather. The weather in Nashville and Phoenix will reach 101F and 108F respectively, while temperatures in Memphis, New Orleans, Atlanta and Dallas will range between 90F-100F.

When temperatures are highest at 5pm.  on Monday, the weather in Minneapolis will be 89F, while Chicago will bear the brunt of 93F weather.  Nashville and Phoenix will reach 101F and 108F respectively while temperatures in Memphis, New Orleans, Atlanta and Dallas will range between 90F-100F

When temperatures are highest at 5pm. on Monday, the weather in Minneapolis will be 89F, while Chicago will bear the brunt of 93F weather. Nashville and Phoenix will reach 101F and 108F respectively while temperatures in Memphis, New Orleans, Atlanta and Dallas will range between 90F-100F

The National Weather Services in St. Louis and Minneapolis tweeted Monday that the heat index in the area was up to 105F with temperatures around 101F

The National Weather Services in St. Louis and Minneapolis tweeted Monday that the heat index in the area was up to 105F with temperatures around 101F

Roads in Minnesota's capital begin to crumble under extreme heat, posing dangerous hazards to drivers

Roads in Minnesota’s capital begin to crumble under extreme heat, posing dangerous hazards to drivers

The Minnesota Department of Transportation shared several photos of sections of I-35 collapsing (pictured).  The Interstate runs all the way to Minnesota from the border town of Laredo, Texas

The Minnesota Department of Transportation shared several photos of sections of I-35 collapsing (pictured). The Interstate runs all the way to Minnesota from the border town of Laredo, Texas

People flocked to pools, beaches and cooling centers across the Midwest and South, from northern Florida to the Great Lakes, last week as a heat wave pushed temperatures into the 90s and beyond, possibly causing the deaths of at least two people. .

Certain parts of the country, including New Orleans and Mobile, Alabama, hit record highs over the weekend, surpassing 97F and 100F, respectively, on Saturday — breaking Mobile’s 1913 record of 100F.

The National Weather Service urged caution for more than nine million people in eight states that were under heat warnings Monday morning, mostly in the north and west of the country, such as Minnesota, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nebraska and Kansas.

Temperatures reached 108F (42C) in northwestern Kansas last Monday. The western parts of the state and the Texas panhandle reached nearly 110 degrees over the weekend.

Last week, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment was aware of at least 2,000 cattle that died as a result of high temperatures and humidity. The deaths represent a huge economic loss because the animals, which typically weigh about 1,500 pounds, are worth about $2,000 per head, Kansas Livestock Association spokeswoman Scarlett Hagins said.

Federal disaster programs will help some producers who have suffered losses, she added.

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Last weeks, temperature readings for Kansas began to exceed the 100-degree mark, killing thousands of cattle in the area

Last weeks, temperature readings for Kansas began to exceed the 100-degree mark, killing thousands of cattle in the area

Electric utilities in the southeast said they were ready to deal with the second heat wave in the affected areas this week as more people are expected to stay indoors and blow up their air conditioners.

“This is our ‘Super Bowl’ that we prepare for all year. We’re ready to go!’ Tennessee Valley Authority spokesman Scott Fiedler told CNN in a statement.

Entergy, an energy provider primarily present in states bordering the Gulf of Mexico, said it expects power increases in areas in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Orleans and Texas, and expects to reach unprecedented energy levels.

Preparing for extreme heat is a year-round process at Oncor, the largest electric utility in Texas and the fifth largest nationwide. It serves more than 10 million Texans.

“Our maintenance strategy department is starting to look at data analytics and vulnerabilities analysis that we could really focus on as we prepare for summer,” Senior Design Manager and former Assistant District Manager Elizabeth Barrett said on the company’s website.

“We’re looking at areas that could become congested,” she added. ‘Overloaded transformers. We consistently use meter data to see how those transformers might be affected by the increased load and whether those transformers might need to be replaced.”

Recently, wildfires have also cropped up in the Southwest, mainly in Arizona during the last two weeks.  Pictured: A wildfire spreading through grass, undergrowth, and pine trees on the northern edge of Flagstaff, Arizona, on June 15

Recently, wildfires have also cropped up in the Southwest, mainly in Arizona during the last two weeks. Pictured: A wildfire spreading through grass, undergrowth, and pine trees on the northern edge of Flagstaff, Arizona, on June 15

A volunteer hands out cold water bottles to a homeless community during a heat wave with temperatures expected to reach 102 F (39 C) in Dallas, Texas, last week

A volunteer hands out cold water bottles to a homeless community during a heat wave with temperatures expected to reach 102 F (39 C) in Dallas, Texas, last week

People cool off in the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, last week as temperatures there are well above the triple digits

People cool off in the water during a heat wave in Lake Havasu, Arizona, last week as temperatures there are well above the triple digits

And the worst may be yet to come. Nighttime temperatures were hotter than previous years as conditions are expected to be around 100F, which doesn’t provide much relief for a good night’s sleep.

The heat wave is the result of disparate weather conditions across the counties last week, with millions affected by triple-digit temperatures and historic flooding in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming and Montana.

Wildfires have also occurred in Arizona and New Mexico where conditions in the Phoenix are closer to 110F than 100F. A mixture of extreme heat, rain and storms in Ohio also caused many power outages last week.

About 250,000 customers of AEP Ohio, a local energy company, were without power last Tuesday, according to company data.

About 169,000 affected customers lived in the Columbus area.

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