WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

At least 20% of the illegal migrants in El Paso WANT to travel to NYC and are NOT forced onto buses

About a fifth of the migrants transported from El Paso to New York reportedly want to travel to the Big Apple and are not being transported against their will.

Blake Barrow, executive director of the charity El Paso Rescue Mission, said his organization has been overwhelmed by the influx of migrants crossing the border illegally, but the immigrants have been more than happy to accept Texas Governor Greg Abbott’s offer of to drive them to New York. York City.

“About 20% of them want to go to New York,” Barrow wrote in an open letter Wednesday. ‘The city has chartered buses to New York to help those who want that destination.

‘I am not aware of anyone who has been placed on a bus to New York who did not want to go there.’

The El Paso Rescue Mission charity said at least 20 percent of migrants in the Texas city want to be transported to NYC.  Pictured: Migrants sleeping in the charity's chapel, where beds have been set up to accommodate the sudden influx of people in need of accommodation
The El Paso Rescue Mission charity said at least 20 percent of migrants in the Texas city want to be transported to NYC.  Pictured: Migrants sleeping in the charity's chapel, where beds have been set up to accommodate the sudden influx of people in need of accommodation

The El Paso Rescue Mission charity said at least 20 percent of migrants in the Texas city want to be transported to NYC. Pictured: Migrants sleeping in the charity’s chapel, where beds have been set up to accommodate the sudden influx of people in need of accommodation

The charity said it has been overwhelmed as more than 1,000 migrants arrive in the border town every day, but officials say many see the town only as a stopover for their desired destination
The charity said it has been overwhelmed as more than 1,000 migrants arrive in the border town every day, but officials say many see the town only as a stopover for their desired destination

The charity said it has been overwhelmed as more than 1,000 migrants arrive in the border town every day, but officials say many see the town only as a stopover for their desired destination

In an open letter to Washington on Wednesday, El Paso Rescue Mission CEO Blake Barrow (above) urged the government to do something about the influx of illegal crossings
In an open letter to Washington on Wednesday, El Paso Rescue Mission CEO Blake Barrow (above) urged the government to do something about the influx of illegal crossings

In an open letter to Washington on Wednesday, El Paso Rescue Mission CEO Blake Barrow (above) urged the government to do something about the influx of illegal crossings

El Paso has so far sent 51 buses carrying 2,365 migrants to New York City since August 23
El Paso has so far sent 51 buses carrying 2,365 migrants to New York City since August 23

El Paso has so far sent 51 buses carrying 2,365 migrants to New York City since August 23

The crisis at the border is escalating to such an extent that 1,050 migrants, mostly from Venezuela, are arriving every day, with Barrow’s organization struggling to help the new arrivals.

He said the sheer volume of people showing up each day is putting a strain on the shelter, and staff fear they won’t be able to feed and clothe everyone who needs it.

Local food banks have bare shelves and shelters are bursting with beds as cribs have now been set up in the chapel at the El Paso Rescue Mission to accommodate the extra people.

‘The number of migrants we have coming to El Paso is so great that it overwhelms the housing and support services the city is able to provide.

“Of course we need a well-coordinated, federal solution to this problem, but so far no one from Washington has asked for our opinion,” Barrow wrote.

Barrow echoed the words of El Paso Mayor Oscar Leeser, who defended his decision to send busloads of migrants to New York City earlier this week by claiming he was only trying to help them reach their desired destination.

El Paso Mayor Oscar Leeser said the migrants who have overwhelmed his city are looking to reach other parts of the country and claims his bus program is aimed at helping
El Paso Mayor Oscar Leeser said the migrants who have overwhelmed his city are looking to reach other parts of the country and claims his bus program is aimed at helping

El Paso Mayor Oscar Leeser said the migrants who have overwhelmed his city are looking to reach other parts of the country and claims his bus program is aimed at helping

Society is struggling to help the migrants, many of them children.  Pictured: A group of Venezuelans who recently crossed into the United States from Mexico walk together after receiving food and other aid from a Good Samaritan on Sept. 20, 2022, in El Paso
Society is struggling to help the migrants, many of them children.  Pictured: A group of Venezuelans who recently crossed into the United States from Mexico walk together after receiving food and other aid from a Good Samaritan on Sept. 20, 2022, in El Paso

Society is struggling to help the migrants, many of them children. Pictured: A group of Venezuelans who recently crossed into the United States from Mexico walk together after receiving food and other aid from a Good Samaritan on Sept. 20, 2022, in El Paso

The shelves are bare at good banks like El Pasoan's Fighting Hunger.  For years, the city has generously welcomed and fed migrants - but the current influx is stretching resources
The shelves are bare at good banks like El Pasoan's Fighting Hunger.  For years, the city has generously welcomed and fed migrants - but the current influx is stretching resources

The shelves are bare at good banks like El Pasoan’s Fighting Hunger. For years, the city has generously welcomed and fed migrants – but the current influx is stretching resources

Leeser said migrants are not coming to the United States just to land in his border town, but are instead looking to go elsewhere in the country — potentially where they have family or other sponsors.

“The people don’t come to El Paso,” Leeser said. “They are coming to America.”

He said authorities in El Paso talk to migrants and ask them where they want to go before “we take them and help them get to their destination.”

“It’s been really important that we don’t send anybody where they don’t want to go,” he added in an interview with ABC’s This Week on Sunday morning. ‘We make sure we help them.’

‘We put them on buses with food and make sure they get to their destination and make sure we always continue to greet and treat people as human beings.’

Mario D’Agostino, the city’s deputy health chief, supported the mayor’s claim that almost all of the new arrivals wanted to be transported to larger cities.

‘The vast majority of them have requested to go to New York City. We’ve also had several large groups asking to go to Chicago,” he said.

El Paso has so far sent 51 buses carrying 2,365 migrants to New York City since August 23 – and seven more buses headed for the Big Apple on Saturday.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More