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At least 118 Grand Canyon tourists have been struck down with highly contagious norovirus since May

Grand Canyon National Park has seen more than 110 cases of a gastrointestinal illness very similar to the highly contagious norovirus since May, health officials said.

On June 10, the park listed at least 118 people who have fallen ill with symptoms similar to those of the norovirus, which causes vomiting, diarrhea, cramps, body aches and low-grade fever. Grand Canyon News reported.

Grand Canyon National Park, the National Park Service Office of Public Health, Coconino County Health and Human Services, the Arizona Department of Health Services, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working to identify the cause of the outbreak, the latest being cases outbreaks. month.

One such case occurred on May 15, when a hiker trekking through the canyon encountered two disease-stricken people who were vomiting and trapped with their friends without water.

“I ran into two hikers, seriously ill and out of water,” Krisiti Key, of Prescott, Arizona, said in a Facebook video about the ordeal of rescuing them with a rescue helicopter.

“So, yeah, I had my Garmin within reach and pressed SOS, and we’ve got the rangers on their way.”

Krisiti Key, right, said she ran into a hiker and his sick friends, whom she helped rescue in Grand Canyon National Park on May 15

Krisiti Key, right, said she ran into a hiker and his sick friends, whom she helped rescue in Grand Canyon National Park on May 15

Key said one of the hikers was very sick and was vomiting.  She said a ranger later told her he had the norovirus, as officials have recorded 118 cases that resemble the virus since May.

Key said one of the hikers was very sick and was vomiting. She said a ranger later told her he had the norovirus, as officials have recorded 118 cases that resemble the virus since May.

One of the sick hikers was able to get out of the path on his own, while another was flown over

One of the sick hikers was able to get out of the path on his own, while another was flown over

Health officials work to pinpoint the cause of the disease affecting tourists in Grand Canyon National Park

Health officials work to pinpoint the cause of the disease affecting tourists in Grand Canyon National Park

WHAT IS NOROVIRUS?

Norovirus, the winter fallow disease, is a stomach flu that causes vomiting and diarrhea.

It usually disappears within about two days.

The main symptoms are nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. Some people also have a fever, headache, and aching arms and legs.

Symptoms usually start one or two days after being infected.

People can usually manage their symptoms at home. The NHS recommends drinking plenty of fluids and avoiding dehydration.

The virus is spread through close contact with someone who has the virus, or eating food prepared by them.

It can also be transmitted by touching objects contaminated with the virus and then touching your mouth.

In her Facebook post, Key said she was solo hiking the Boucher Trail in the park when she encountered a group of four hikers and greeted them, noting that one of them looked worse from wear and tear.

Key, a regular on the trail, warned the hikers that the trek would only get more difficult, advising them to avoid it after learning that one of them had vomited the night before.

The hikers turned down Key’s offer to call for help using her Garmin, a radio tool that contacts emergency services, so she continued her trek.

After she completed her walk and returned, Key said she found the group in the same spot, with one of them showing clear signs of illness as they continued to vomit and were almost out of water.

Although one of the sick couples left the trail, Key stayed with the other sick hiker and the rest of the group until a rescue helicopter arrived about three hours later.

“Everyone was safe and rested,” Key wrote, “but find out the healthy walker was now vomiting in his room!

“The Rangers actually think the norovirus made them sick! Also find out, it is rampant on the [Grand Canyon] Village, and there have been several rescues on the same trail that same week for the exact same thing!’

Health officials say the 118 infections spanned 16 separate trips in the park and the Colorado River hinterland, with the most recent case reported on June 2.

Jan Balsom, chief of communications at the chief inspector’s office at Grand Canyon National Park, said warnings about the gastrointestinal illness have been issued since May 20.

“We haven’t seen an outbreak like this in about 10 years,” Balsom told the… Daily Beast

Officials are investigating the cause of the outbreak and identifying the number of norovirus cases.

“It is unknown at this time what causes the disease,” the National Park Service Office of Public Health said in a statement.

Balsom noted that there is a limited amount of time in which researchers can collect stool samples to confirm a norovirus infection.

†[Officials] have followed up the interviews of participants of trips who have become ill,” Balsom added. “They tested poo scans to determine if it’s noro or not.”

Key talked about the incident as she waited for the rescue helicopter with the hikers for three hours

She said the group was running out of water with one hiker who kept vomiting

Key (above) talked about the incident as she waited for the rescue helicopter with the hikers for three hours. She said the group was running out of water with one hiker who kept vomiting

The rescue helicopter was able to save the party as Key walked back to the lounge

The rescue helicopter was able to save the party as Key walked back to the lounge

She said one of the healthy walkers (left) later fell ill with the same disease

She said one of the healthy walkers (left) later fell ill with the same disease

The virus is mainly spread through close contact with someone who has the virus, or eating food prepared by them.

It can also be transmitted by touching objects contaminated with the virus and then touching your mouth.

The Grand Canyon Hikers’ Facebook group has also warned about the outbreak, saying rivers in the area are contaminated with the virus.

Shelby Sundquist, a member of the group, urged hikers to treat their drinking water to prevent contamination after she became ill with norovirus herself in May.

“I was lucky: I got sick for hours after hiking out of the canyon. I wouldn’t have been able to walk or fend for myself if I had started throwing up in the canyon,” she wrote.

“GC public health officials are monitoring the situation. Apparently it’s a big one.’

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