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An asylum seeker allegedly abusing a child on Nauru (photo) has been allowed to re-enter Australia under controversial co-vac laws

Asylum seeker, once accused of molesting a child on Nauru, gets the green light to enter Australia under controversial medevac laws

  • A Burmese man may re-enter Australia through a co-vac application
  • He was accused of abusing a child in 2015 and attacking his girlfriend
  • He may enter the country because his application has not breached the safety tests
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An asylum seeker accused of molesting a child on Nauru will be allowed to enter Australia under Medevac legislation.

The Burmese man was given the green light to travel to Australia, where he could stay for years, following a successful co-vac application last month.

He had originally entered Australia in 2013 before being transferred to Nauru, where he was accused in 2015 of abusing a child.

The charge was later withdrawn because the family of the alleged victim did not want the child to testify.

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The man was also once accused of mistreatment after allegedly kicking his girlfriend and her mother in the face. Those charges have also been withdrawn.

An asylum seeker allegedly abusing a child on Nauru (photo) has been allowed to re-enter Australia under controversial co-vac laws

An asylum seeker allegedly abusing a child on Nauru (photo) has been allowed to re-enter Australia under controversial co-vac laws

He was admitted to enter Australia despite his history because his application did not infringe and safety tests in the Medevac legislation in the ASIO Act.

The condition of the man is not life threatening and it is unknown where he will be treated, but it is unlikely that he will be admitted to the hospital, The Daily Telegraph reported.

According to the legislation, asylum seekers are not returned to detention centers after their treatment, which means that the man could stay in Australia indefinitely.

There have been 120 medevac requests in the last month, with only 562 people in detention centers at sea.

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The House of Representatives voted to repeal the Medevac laws after the elections, while the Greens, Labor and Center Alliance all expressed their support for the bill.

There have been 136 prisoners who entered Australia from Nauru and Papua New Guinea since Medevac legislation was passed in February, with fewer than one in ten needing medical treatment on arrival.

Legislation stipulates that asylum seekers are not sent back to detention centers after their treatment, which means that the Burmese man can then remain in Australia indefinitely by avoiding deportation (photo: tent accommodation and asylum seekers on Nauru in 2012)

Legislation stipulates that asylum seekers are not sent back to detention centers after their treatment, which means that the Burmese man can then remain in Australia indefinitely by avoiding deportation (photo: tent accommodation and asylum seekers on Nauru in 2012)

Legislation stipulates that asylum seekers are not sent back to detention centers after their treatment, which means that the Burmese man can then remain in Australia indefinitely by avoiding deportation (photo: tent accommodation and asylum seekers on Nauru in 2012)

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