Astrophotographer takes his ‘clearest photo ever of the SUN’

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Astrophotographer captures his ‘brightest photo ever of the SUN’ – a 230 megapixel image made up of 100,000 photos

  • Photographer Andrew McCarthy took 100,000 photos at about 100 per minute
  • In combination, they created a dramatic 230-megapixel photo of the star
  • McCarthy has been photographing the sun and moon for about three years
  • He says this is the clearest picture he has ever taken of our life-giving star

A sensational blood-red image of the sun, composed of 100,000 images taken from Earth, shows our star in intricate detail, including a solar flare from a building.

Astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy said the image of the sun was one of the “brightest” photos he has ever taken of our guest star, at 230 megapixels.

McCarthy has been photographing the sun and moon for three years, but this month he took on his ‘most unique challenge’ yet.

Using a new ultra-sharp solar telescope, the California photographer overlaid thousands of photos to capture the sun in breathtaking detail.

Astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy said the image of the sun was one of the 'brightest' photos he ever took of our guest star

Astrophotographer Andrew McCarthy said the image of the sun was one of the ‘brightest’ photos he ever took of our guest star

The huge 230 megapixel image – a standard camera is about 10 megapixels – shows the circular sun shining deep, dramatic red against a dark sky.

The combined photo is so clear that even the plasma at the outer edge of the sun can be seen – dancing in the atmosphere like a flame.

He had to take nearly 100,000 individual photos of the sun – at a rate of about 100 photos per second to capture the amazing detail.

He said, “I was very pleased with the end result.”

“I wasn’t sure the image would turn out so well, because stitching together a large photo of the sun presents unique challenges that I’ve never experienced before.”

The huge 230 megapixel image - a standard camera is about 10 megapixels - shows the circular sun shining deep, dramatic red against a dark sky.

The huge 230 megapixel image – a standard camera is about 10 megapixels – shows the circular sun shining deep, dramatic red against a dark sky.

“But I’m definitely going to make more of it.”

He added: “To capture the sun in more detail than I’ve ever tried, I put together a new solar telescope that gave me a focal length of 4000mm, about 10x the magnification of my previous telescope.

‘I used a technique called’ lucky imaging ‘, so the best frames from a given session are stacked on top of each other to lessen the effects of the atmosphere.

‘These photos were taken just before noon, when the sun was high in the sky but the atmosphere was still relatively calm.

He had to take nearly 100,000 individual photos of the sun - at a speed of about 100 photos per second to capture the amazing detail

He had to take nearly 100,000 individual photos of the sun – at a speed of about 100 photos per second to capture the amazing detail

‘By capturing close-up details of the surface with this rig, timed when the atmosphere was very still, I was able to produce sharp details on the surface.

These objects at the edge of the sun are known as a ‘prominence’ – a mass of plasma suspended in the sun’s atmosphere by the sun’s powerful magnetic field.

“These are quite common and take a long time.”

Visit his to see more of Andrew’s amazing astrophotography Instagram page, or go to his Patreon.

THE SUN: A STAR AT THE CENTER OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM

The sun is a G-type main sequence star at the heart of the solar system, whose radiation makes life possible on Earth.

It is sometimes referred to as a yellow dwarf star, but this is not entirely accurate as the light is more white than orange.

The star was formed about 4.6 billion years ago after the gravitational collapse of matter in a large molecular cloud.

Most of this matter led to the formation of the star itself, while the rest formed like a disk, orbited the star, and eventually merged into the planets, moons, asteroids, and comets that make up the rest of the solar system.

The sun is 109 times larger than Earth with a mass 330,000 times that of our host planet – in fact, it accounts for 99.86% of the mass of the entire solar system including all objects orbiting it. to turn.

The star will reach its red giant phase in about 7 billion years when the hydrogen in the core is no longer enough for fusion to take place.

In the red giant phase, it will expand to engulf the orbits of Mercury and Venus, leaving Earth uninhabitable.

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