Astrophotographer takes a photo of the International Space Station as it moves through the sun

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Blink and you will miss it! Astrophotographer captures a perfectly timed image of the International Space Station as it moves through the sun

  • The photo was taken last week by an astrophotographer in Germany when the ISS came over him
  • The photo was planned for three weeks and was successfully taken by Mehmet Ergun
  • He has taken several photos of the ISS on its way and posts them to his 14,000 followers on Instagram

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An amateur astrophotographer has captured an incredible photo of the International Space Station (ISS) flying in front of the sun.

Mehmet Ergun took the photo on April 2 from his base in Germany and had already planned the photo for three weeks.

He has now successfully captured several photos of the ISS underway and posts them on his Instagram, where he has more than 14,000 followers.

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An amateur astrophotographer has captured an incredible photo of the International Space Station (ISS) flying in front of the sun

An amateur astrophotographer has captured an incredible photo of the International Space Station (ISS) flying in front of the sun

Mehmet Ergun took the photo from his base in Germany on April 2 and had planned the photo for three weeks before it was successfully released.

Mehmet Ergun took the photo from his base in Germany on April 2 and had planned the photo for three weeks before it was successfully released.

Mehmet Ergun took the photo from his base in Germany on April 2 and had planned the photo for three weeks before it was successfully released.

The space buff captured the photo with a Lunt LS80 DSII solar scope, Rainbow RST-135 star tracker, a QHY5III174M camera, Hutech Hinode solar guider and a 2x Meade Series 5000 Barlow Lens.

It allowed him to photograph the ISS at the exact moment it passed 300 miles (500 km) overhead in Alzey, Germany.

He said, “I scheduled the shot about three weeks ago and with a little luck I was able to take it.

“This is my fourth ISS transit photo, and every time I am fascinated and excited at the same time.

NASA also shared my photo on Instagram Story. For such pictures, many things must be suitable. Weather, sight, equipment, location, time and some know-how.

‘Preparations can start weeks in advance, but photography takes less than a second.’

Mr. Ergun He has now successfully taken several photos of the ISS underway and posts them on his Instagram, where he has more than 14,000 followers

Mr. Ergun He has now successfully taken several photos of the ISS underway and posts them on his Instagram, where he has more than 14,000 followers

Mr. Ergun He has now successfully taken several photos of the ISS underway and posts them on his Instagram, where he has more than 14,000 followers

In April last year, he took high-definition images that followed the space station's journey in front of the sun.  The ISS is the largest object ever brought into space by humans and is 357 feet long

In April last year, he took high-definition images that followed the space station's journey in front of the sun.  The ISS is the largest object ever brought into space by humans and is 357 feet long

In April last year, he took high-definition images that followed the space station’s journey in front of the sun. The ISS is the largest object ever brought into space by humans and is 357 feet long

The German astrophotographer says his photo was shared on NASA's Instagram story.  He has now conquered the ISS on its way four times

The German astrophotographer says his photo was shared on NASA's Instagram story.  He has now conquered the ISS on its way four times

The German astrophotographer says his photo was shared on NASA’s Instagram story. He has now conquered the ISS on its way four times

The space buff captured the photo with a Lunt LS80 DSII solar scope, Rainbow RST-135 star tracker, a QHY5III174M camera, Hutech Hinode solar guider and a 2x Meade Series 5000 Barlow Lens

The space buff captured the photo with a Lunt LS80 DSII solar scope, Rainbow RST-135 star tracker, a QHY5III174M camera, Hutech Hinode solar guider and a 2x Meade Series 5000 Barlow Lens

The space buff captured the photo with a Lunt LS80 DSII solar scope, Rainbow RST-135 star tracker, a QHY5III174M camera, Hutech Hinode solar guider and a 2x Meade Series 5000 Barlow Lens

In April last year, he took high-definition images that followed the space station’s journey in front of the sun.

The ISS is the largest object ever brought into space by humans and is 357 feet long.

Ergün used a powerful telescope attached to a camera to capture 34 separate frames as the orbiting ISS crossed between planet Earth for less than a second.

The images are then collected so that the craft can race from one edge of the sun to the other in a short animation.

The tiny satellite-shaped spacecraft looks like a miniature model as it flies from one side of our glowing orange sun to the other.

“The sun moved very fast because I use a high focal length and a small sensor,” Ergün said last year.

“Astrophotography is an immersive hobby inspired by all the beauty the universe has to offer.”

EXPLAINED: THE $ 100 BILLION INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION SITS 250 MILES ABOVE THE EARTH

The International Space Station (ISS) is a $ 100 billion (£ 80 billion) science and engineering laboratory orbiting the Earth.

It has been permanently manned since November 2000 by changing crews of astronauts and cosmonauts.

Research on board the ISS often requires one or more of the unusual conditions present in low Earth orbit, such as low gravity or oxygen.

ISS studies have explored human research, aerospace medicine, life sciences, natural sciences, astronomy and meteorology.

The US space agency NASA spends about $ 3 billion (£ 2.4 billion) per year on the space station program, a level of funding endorsed by the Trump administration and Congress.

A US House of Representatives committee overseeing NASA has begun to explore whether the program should be extended beyond 2024.

Alternatively, the money could be used to accelerate planned human space initiatives to the Moon and Mars.

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