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Astonishing moment little girl sitting on adults knee tips topless drag queen at Michigan gay bar

A young girl was filmed tipping a drag queen bareing a huge set of synthetic breasts at a “family-friendly” event at a gay venue in Michigan.

The child, whose age has not been disclosed, passed on a bill in the clip to RuPaul’s Drag Race star Yara Sofia at Hamburger Mary’s in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

She was sitting on the knee of a grown woman at the time, who smiled warmly as the youngster tipped the performer, whose real name is Gabriel Burgos Ortiz.

Sofia stepped around the bar wearing a pair of large fake breasts hanging outside her costumes, complete with little yellow pasties covering the nipples in what appeared to be an attempt at modesty.

The video was shot at a branch of the LGBT bar and restaurant chain in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in September 2021.

It was originally posted by a TikTok user DavidLovesDragOk and has since been re-shared by the anti-woke Twitter account Libs of TikTok amid growing concerns about children being taken to sexualized shows in the name of diversity.

Hamburger Mary’s Grand Rapids outlet closed in January this year, but its Facebook page is still active, complete with dozens of event flyers.

Many of them are explicitly advertised as being for audiences 18 and older only.

But the flyer for the drag event attended by Yara Sofia was not, suggesting that it has indeed been marketed as a family-friendly event.

A stunning moment shows a little girl sitting on an adult's knee at a drag show in Michigan and tipping an artist with large, synthetic breasts at what was supposed to be a 'family-friendly' event

A stunning moment shows a little girl sitting on an adult’s knee at a drag show in Michigan and tipping an artist with large, synthetic breasts at what was supposed to be a ‘family-friendly’ event

The September 2021 video, posted nearly nine months later by the infamous @LibsofTikTok account, shows the artist then taking off, taking a few more tips and letting it all hang.

The September 2021 video, posted nearly nine months later by the infamous @LibsofTikTok account, shows the artist then taking off, taking a few more tips and letting it all hang.

This is the flyer for the Yara Sofia event.  Unlike other evenings advertised by Hamburger Mary's, it was not billed as being only for customers aged 18 and over, suggesting it could be considered a family-friendly event

This is the flyer for the Yara Sofia event. Unlike other evenings advertised by Hamburger Mary’s, it was not billed as being only for customers aged 18 and over, suggesting it could be considered a family-friendly event

Yara Sofia is the stage name of Gabriel Burgos Ortiz, 38, born in Puerto Rico and singer

Yara Sofia is the stage name of Gabriel Burgos Ortiz, 38, born in Puerto Rico and singer

The news comes as debates rage across the country over whether young children are being exposed to inappropriate content by well-meaning family members and educators in the name of support for LGBT equality.

New York City has spent a lot of money sending drag queens to its public elementary schools and has dropped more than $200,000 in performances since 2018.

Last month, data shows the city paid $46,000 to send Drag Story Hour NYC to public schools, libraries and street festivals, according to the New York Post

Some parents say the programs were booked without their consent, while city officials have reacted with outrage, according to the Post.

Drag Queen story hours have also made headlines. They see artists reading storybooks to children at events in schools or libraries.

The books read to children are storybooks for children, usually by drag queens in less revealing outfits.

Supporters say the events are harmless and harmless, but conservatives argue that the story hours often culminate in age-appropriate vulgarity.

A drag queen named Flame reads stories to children and their caregivers during a Drag Story Hour at a New York public library, Friday, June 17, 2022. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

A drag queen named Flame reads stories to children and their caregivers during a Drag Story Hour at a New York public library, Friday, June 17, 2022. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Drag Queen Story Hour, a non-profit organization, was founded in 2015 in San Francisco by activist and author Michelle Tea. Since then, chapters have opened in the US and elsewhere. Other organizations with readers in drag have also formed.

As part of the Drag Queen Story Hour programming, drag queens read to children and their parents in libraries, bookstores, fairs, parks and other public spaces to celebrate reading “through the glamorous art of drag.”

In 2022 alone, Drag Story Hour NYC made 49 appearances at 34 public schools in New York City, according to its website.

The organization is known for promoting inclusivity, creativity and self acceptance in children by exposing them to drag queens who read similar thematic books.

“Through fun and fantastic educational experiences, our programs celebrate gender diversity and all forms of difference to build empathy and give children the confidence to express themselves the way they feel comfortable,” the website reads.

Images from the site show people dressed in bedazzled dresses, glittering wigs, and heavy eyeshadow, reading to young children in class, and even helping the kids apply makeup themselves.

A drag artist from Drag Story Hour NYC reading to children at an event.  Parents told the New York Post that events at their children's school often took place without parental consent

A drag artist from Drag Story Hour NYC reading to children at an event. Parents told the New York Post that events at their children’s school often took place without parental consent

An artist shows off some of the books read to children at public school drag events.  The books are mostly about gender fluid topics

An artist shows off some of the books read to children at public school drag events. The books are mostly about gender fluid topics

The company has received $207,000 from taxpayers since 2018, data shows. $50,000 of that comes from the New York State Council on the Arts, and the other $157,000 from the NYC Department of Education, the Department of Youth and Community Development, the Department of Transportation, and Cultural Affairs.

The funds were provided by city council members, with $80,000 allocated for drag programs in 2022 alone — more than three times the amount in 2020 for drag programs.

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