Asian boktorren have been exterminated in Britain after six years of falling and overseeing

Asian boktor, threatening British oak and birch trees, has been & wiped out & # 39; in the United Kingdom

  • An outbreak in 2012 threatened to destroy thousands of hectares of forest
  • The insects were spotted in Kent and led to more than 2,000 trees being felled
  • The plane tree is their top host with 98 percent of the adults who come out
  • Its larvae feed can carry tunnels in the trunks and branches of deciduous forests

The Asian Longhorn Beetle is wiped out in Great Britain after six years, according to the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs.

It poses a serious threat to the wood and fruit production industry in the UK and is believed to come from China.

The announcement comes after a project designed to capture and control them by the British government after the 2012 outbreak.

The contamination was said to have come from imported wooden packaging and led to thousands of trees that were felled in Kent.

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The Asian boktor (photo) has been eradicated in the UK according to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

The Asian boktor (photo) has been eradicated in the UK according to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs

The spotted black and white beetle, which is twice the length of its body, infects trees during its breeding season in August and September.

After the outbreak of the tree-killing beetles, the British government warned that they could wipe out thousands of hectares of forest.

The beetles, capable of flying more than one mile at a time, were first seen in Kent and later spread to 2,116 trees throughout the county.

The insects were labeled as a & # 39; serious threat & # 39; for natural forests and farms because they can be bored by foliage and disrupt timber and fruit production in the UK.

The plague feeds on a series of broad-leaved trees such as birch and oak, while the larvae feed on the wood of living trees, boring galleries – or tunnels – in the trunks and branches.

It was thought that the critters were accidentally shipped to Britain in wood that was used to package goods imported from China.

The larvae live in living trees, but can also survive in the wood of freshly felled trees, although they do not live in dead wood, as it occurs in houses and homes.

These can penetrate from the outer layer to the heartwood and a serious infection can kill the tree.

The government thought it had brought the problem under control until researchers recently discovered the insects in Sussex and Hampshire.

It was thought that the critters were accidentally shipped to Britain in wood that was used to package goods imported from China It was thought that the critters were accidentally shipped to Britain in wood that was used to package goods imported from China
The Asian boktor to which the forestry commission has issued a warning The Asian boktor to which the forestry commission has issued a warning

It was thought that the critters were accidentally shipped to Britain in wood that was used to package goods imported from China

Out of more than 2000 trees felled and examined, 66 trees contain Asian boktorren.

The most common host has been identified as plane tree: 70 percent of the total larvae found were found in plane tree; and 98 percent of the adults found were from common fig trees.

Nicola Spence, Defra's Chief Plant Health Officer, said: ÔÇťAsian Longhorn Beetle would pose a serious threat to our tree landscape if it is established, so it's great news that it has been officially eradicated in the UK.

& # 39; Strong biosecurity depends on everyone who plays his role – in our forests, at borders or when buying plants.

& # 39; It is important that we continue to make people aware of the simple things that people can do to protect themselves against diseases and pests, such as getting plants from a reputable nursery. & # 39;

WHAT IS THE THREAT OF ASIAN LONGHORN KEVERS?

The Asian Longhorn and its cousin, the Citrus Longhorn, are from China and the Korean Peninsula.

The spotted black and white beetle, which is twice the length of its body, infects trees during its breeding season in August and September.

The pest is a serious threat to a series of broad-leaved trees, including species grown commercially for the production of wood and fruit.

The larvae of the beetle feed on the wood of living trees, boring galleries or tunnels in the trunks and branches.

The galleries can penetrate all the way from the outermost layer to the heartwood and a serious infection can kill the tree.

The insects, which are able to fly more than one mile at a time, were first seen in Kent during an outbreak in 2012 – which led to the felling of 2,116 trees in the county.

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