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Ken White is dissatisfied that the emblem of the Virgin Atlantic Flying Lady that he has made will not appear on new aircraft

Artist using the logo & # 39; Virgin Lady & # 39; of Virgin Atlantic, is & # 39; disappointed & # 39; and the airline has replaced it with & # 39; various men and women representing modern Great Britain & # 39; including black and gay characters

  • Ken White worked from 1978 to 1990 as Richard Branson's artist
  • Mr White, 72, from Swindon, created the Virgin Atlantic & Scarlet Lady & # 39; in 1984
  • He said his design was inspired by the artwork on the side of WWII aircraft
  • After the change, Mr. White said the decision & # 39; disappointing & # 39; used to be
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An artist who designed Virgin Atlantic's iconic & # 39; flying lady & # 39; logo is fuming – after the company replaced it with a black woman.

Dissatisfied Ken White cannot understand why the pin-up image he created 35 years ago needs to be diversified to better represent modern Britain.

The 72-year-old, from Swindon, Wiltshire, was given the task of coming up with the design while working as Richard Richard Branson's artist between 1978 and 1990 at Virgin.

Ken White is dissatisfied that the emblem of the Virgin Atlantic Flying Lady that he has made will not appear on new planes

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Ken White is dissatisfied that the emblem of the Virgin Atlantic Flying Lady that he has made will not appear on new planes

Ken White, pictured, worked for Virgin as an artist between 1978 and 1990

Ken White, pictured, worked for Virgin as an artist between 1978 and 1990

Ken White, pictured, worked for Virgin as an artist between 1978 and 1990

He has criticized the airline's decision to update the logo to reflect the diversity of Britain

He has criticized the airline's decision to update the logo to reflect the diversity of Britain

He has criticized the airline's decision to update the logo to reflect the diversity of Britain

He created the & # 39; Scarlet Lady & # 39; after being asked to produce something similar to the art painted on World War II aircraft and that of Peruvian pin-up artist Albero Vargas.

Although the woman changed, the style and form has been maintained – until the recent diversification.

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The airline unveiled the first of its fleet of twelve Airbus A350-1000 aircraft – with a black woman in white blouse and red shorts – in August.

Mr. White said: & # 39; It was a design that I thought worked and changed with the British flag, but then I read that they changed it into a gay person and a black woman.

& # 39; I don't understand what was wrong with it in the first place; it was an icon and people knew the airline before it.

The new logo & # 39; s were revealed on the new Airbus A350-1000 jets, pictured

The new logo & # 39; s were revealed on the new Airbus A350-1000 jets, pictured

The new logo & # 39; s were revealed on the new Airbus A350-1000 jets, pictured

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& # 39; With the diversification of the image you wonder where it will all end. It is disappointing. & # 39;

Virgin announced the move in April, rolling out the twelve new aircraft with the changes at the end of 2021.

Nikki Humphrey, senior vice president of people at Virgin, said: & The saying is that you can't be what you can't see and that has never been more true than the glamorous image of the aviation industry in the past.

& # 39; With the introduction of our new Flying Icons, I hope it encourages people of all backgrounds to feel at home with us, but also to work with us. & # 39;

A spokesperson for the brand added yesterday (Weds): & # 39; Virgin Atlantic is particularly proud to welcome its new Flying Icons, which represent modern Britain through a wide range of men and women. & # 39;

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White continued working on murals and painting as a freelancer in Westland after leaving Virgin and is currently holding an exhibition in his home town.

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