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The British artist David Hockney moved to Los Angeles after 55 years to live the rest of his days

Famous British artist David Hockney gives up Los Angeles after 55 years for Normandy, France, to live the rest of his days.

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& # 39; I can do twice as much work there, three times as much & # 39 ;, Hockney says Wall Street Journal from leaving the city that made him famous in the sixties. & # 39; I probably don't have much time left & # 39 ;, he says, & # 39; and because I don't, I appreciate it even more.

It is there in his new home that he bought on a whim last year after having seen it for only 25 minutes that the 82-year-old created his latest work, inspired by the view from his Norman home, to be in Manhattan this fall. are exhibited.

& # 39; I would just like to work and paint, & # 39; he says. & # 39; And can smoke and eat at the same time in a restaurant. Thank goodness for Normandy. The French know how to live. They know what pleasure is. & # 39;

The British artist David Hockney moved to Los Angeles after 55 years to live the rest of his days

The British artist David Hockney moved to Los Angeles after 55 years to live the rest of his days

& # 39; I have been smoking for more than 60 years & # 39 ;, he says to the Wall Street Journal and says he is moving to France to smoke & eat at a restaurant at the same time & # 39;

& # 39; I have been smoking for more than 60 years & # 39 ;, he tells the Wall Street Journal and says he is moving to France to be able to smoke & eat at a restaurant at the same time & # 39;

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& # 39; I have been smoking for more than 60 years & # 39 ;, he says to the Wall Street Journal and says he is moving to France to smoke & eat at a restaurant at the same time & # 39;

Last year, the 1972 Hockney painting rose to $ 90.3 million at Christie's, breaking the record for the highest price ever paid at an auction for a work by a living artist.

The previous record for a work by a living artist was in the hands of the Balloon Dog sculpture by Jeff Koons, who sold for $ 58.4 million in 2013. The previous Hockney auction record was $ 28.4 million.

& # 39; I am 82. How much time do I have left? I'm dying from a smoking-related illness or a non-smoking-related illness, & he says

& # 39; I am 82. How much time do I have left? I'm dying from a smoking-related illness or a non-smoking-related illness, & he says

& # 39; I am 82. How much time do I have left? I'm dying from a smoking-related illness or a non-smoking-related illness, & he says

Now Hockney is showing new work this fall in the flagship of Pace Gallery in Manhattan.

The compelling panorama with 24 panels and four additional drawings show the arrival of spring in Normandy, seen from his new house, La Grande Cour (The Big Yard).

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& # 39; I fell in love with it & # 39 ;, he says about the house.

It took 21 days to complete Hockney and will show his new home in detail – with an image of the cherry, pear, and apple tree grounds of the 1650 structure.

& # 39; These works emphasize Hockney's ability to combine multiple spatial and temporary experiences of a place into one image & # 39 ;, is the Pace Gallery website.

Influenced by disparate sources such as traditional Chinese scroll painting, contemporary contemporary art and the medieval Bayeux carpet, produced in England and housed in the Normandy neighborhood, these new works show Hockney's ongoing experiments with the representation of space. & # 39;

& # 39; It took a long time to make the dots, & # 39; Hockney told the Wall Street Journal. & # 39; In the end it got a little boring, but I was completely confiscated and loved it. & # 39;

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Hockney described his relaxing routine in Normandy: waking up early to see the sun rise, and then working in the studio all morning.

& # 39; In the afternoon, he says he pauses for a four-course lunch – his only meal of the day – in a nearby café that costs just € 13.

He says he sometimes takes a nap and then works until & # 39; late at night.

The 82-year-old created his latest work inspired by the view from his Norman home to be exhibited in Manhattan this fall at Pace Gallery (photo)

The 82-year-old created his latest work inspired by the view from his Norman home to be exhibited in Manhattan this fall at Pace Gallery (photo)

The 82-year-old created his latest work inspired by the view from his Norman home to be exhibited in Manhattan this fall at Pace Gallery (photo)

The portrait of an artist (pool with two figures) painting, which belongs to billionaire Spurs owner Joe Lewis, broke all records for a living artist after sale for $ 90.3 million last year
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The portrait of an artist (pool with two figures) painting, which belongs to billionaire Spurs owner Joe Lewis, broke all records for a living artist after sale for $ 90.3 million last year

The portrait of an artist (pool with two figures) painting, which belongs to billionaire Spurs owner Joe Lewis, broke all records for a living artist after sale for $ 90.3 million last year

& # 39; His respect for art history is enormous & # 39 ;, says Stephanie Barron Wall Street Journal. She is a senior curator of modern art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and organized the David Hockney museum exhibition in 2018: 82 portraits and 1 still life.

& # 39; This is an artist who reads and looks with a deep intensity and intellectualism and curiosity. He studies the work of the masters: Manet, Monet, Rembrandt (en) Picasso, with whom he has been in dialogue for life. He has involved art historians in serious discussions about perspective and technology. & # 39;

Hockney says he doesn't care about fame. & # 39; I have the vanity of an artist. I want my work to be seen. But I don't have to be seen. & # 39;

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He says he wants to keep a third to half of his works to himself.

The drawings from Normandy will most likely remain in his personal collection, but he says he still decides.

& # 39; Sometimes I decide to keep what I consider the best, & # 39; he says. & # 39; I do not yet know what to do with (the collection). I probably give it away to museums. & # 39;

And when it comes to leaving the city that made him famous years ago, he says that Americans have become censored about smoking and that is something he will never give up.

& # 39; I have been smoking for over 60 years & # 39 ;, he says. & # 39; But I think I'm pretty healthy. I'm 82. How much time do I have? I'm dying of a smoking-related illness or a non-smoking-related illness. & # 39;

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