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Grande posted photos of her brain scans on her Instagram story on Thursday. The scans showed the narrative diamond shape that patients with PTSD develop

Ariana Grande shares & # 39; terrifying & # 39; brain scan revealing her PTSD almost two years after the terrorist attack at her concert in Manchester

  • Grande, 25, has elaborated her vocal health problems after the terrorist attack at her concert in Manchester, England in 2017
  • She posted photos of her brain scans on her Instagram story on Thursday
  • The scans showed the narrative diamond shape that patients with PTSD develop
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Ariana Grande has shared photos of her brain scans that appear to show signs of PTSD.

The 25-year-old singer, vocally struggling about her mental health after the terrorist attack at her concert in Manchester, England in 2017, posted the photos on her Instagram story and wrote: & # 39; hilarious and terrifying. & # 39;

For the context, she also shared examples of a & # 39; healthy & # 39; brain and brain & # 39; with PTSD & # 39 ;, both of which seemed much milder than hers.

Dr. Daniel Amen, a leading psychiatrist and brain scan specialist who pioneered the use of this psychiatry technology, agreed that DailyMail.com agrees that her brain has the distinctive & # 39; diamond & # 39; shape of PTSD and greets Grande for destigmatizing mental illness.

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Grande posted photos of her brain scans on her Instagram story on Thursday. The scans showed the narrative diamond shape that patients with PTSD develop

Grande posted photos of her brain scans on her Instagram story on Thursday. The scans showed the narrative diamond shape that patients with PTSD develop

The 25-year-old singer has been vocal about her fight against mental health after the terrorist attack at her concert in Manchester, England in 2017. To be seen on March 30

The 25-year-old singer has been vocal about her fight against mental health after the terrorist attack at her concert in Manchester, England in 2017. To be seen on March 30

The 25-year-old singer has been vocal about her fight against mental health after the terrorist attack at her concert in Manchester, England in 2017. To be seen on March 30

& # 39; Trauma can have a lasting impact on your brain and we can see it with SPECT imaging. And you can treat it with medication or therapy! But without photos, you throw darts in the dark at people, & # 39; said Dr. Amen.

& # 39; Most people are just diagnosed for symptoms and you don't know what's really going on in their brains, which makes treatment difficult.

& # 39; This gives (Grande & # 39; s) doctors a card to work with. & # 39;

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Dr. Amen broke new paths in 2015 to show the distinctive features of PTSD by publishing a paper in the journal PLOS One.

The study included 20,000 people with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) or traumatic brain injury (TBI), who have similar symptoms but manifest themselves very differently in the brain.

Each participant was scanned with single-photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) imaging, which measures the blood flow in the brain and in every brain region.

They managed to make a map of what PTSD looks like.

Crucially, they found a narrative & # 39; diamond & # 39; shape in patients with PTSD, which is evident on Grande & # 39; s scans, with an overactive blood supply to a few main areas:

Ariana Grande & # 39; s brain scan shows the classic & # 39; diamond & # 39; form of trauma
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Ariana Grande & # 39; s brain scan shows the classic & # 39; diamond & # 39; form of trauma

Ariana Grande & # 39; s brain scan shows the classic & # 39; diamond & # 39; form of trauma

These brain scans, taken in the practice of Dr. Daniel Amen, show the difference between PTSD, a healthy brain and TBI. In PTSD, four areas become overactive, which leads to negative thoughts

These brain scans, taken in the practice of Dr. Daniel Amen, show the difference between PTSD, a healthy brain and TBI. In PTSD, four areas become overactive, which leads to negative thoughts

These brain scans, taken in the practice of Dr. Daniel Amen, show the difference between PTSD, a healthy brain and TBI. In PTSD, four areas become overactive, which leads to negative thoughts

  • At the top there is the anterior cingulate gyrus, what the & # 39; gear change & # 39; of the brain is for controlling the emotional response. & # 39; When it is overactive, people are stuck with negative thoughts, it is as if the trauma can go through & # 39 ;, Dr. Amen explains.
  • On the two sides there is the amygdala, who manages the reaction of fear, and the basal ganglia, which also includes emotion and background & # 39; non-declarative & # 39; influence memories.
  • At the bottom of the diamond you have the thalamus, which receives sensory information. & # 39; If it is too active, too much comes in and you are overwhelming, anxious and unable to let go of negative thoughts. & # 39;

WHAT IS PTSD?

The VA & # 39; s National center for PTSD describes four important ways in which a person can experience PTSD.

  1. Relive the event
  2. Avoid things that remind you of the event
  3. Have more negative thoughts and feelings than before
  4. Feeling on the edge
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Treatment for PTSD has developed dramatically in recent decades.

Thanks to NIH and VA funded investigations of veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the PTSD investigation grew.

Dr. Amen said that Grande is adding her voice to this issue, not only shedding light on available brain scan technologies, but also helping to destigmatize the symptoms that suffer a lot after a traumatic event.

& # 39; The majority of mental illness is not mental, it is a brain. If we don't understand that, people often don't get the help they need and people are ultimately embarrassed, & said Dr. Amen.

& # 39; By sharing this photo & # 39; s, she really helped normalize it. & # 39;

  • Anyone in need of crisis support can call the Crisis Call Center hotline (open 24 hours): 1-775-784-8090
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