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Arguing before going to bed and checking your phone really affects sleep – unlike cheese and daytime naps

Eating cheese right before bed can make your dreams more pleasant, but it doesn’t affect the quality of your sleep – unlike arguing and checking your phone.

This is just one of the sleep-related myths debunked by the NHS physician and British television personality Ranj Singh to promote a healthier night’s sleep.

Other activities to avoid right before going to bed include exercising, eating large meals, and drinking caffeinated beverages.

Dr. Singh also notes that the idea that everyone needs a solid eight hours of sleep is misleading – with really varying needs, ranging from 7 to 9 hours a night.

According to a recent survey from Kings College London, 60 percent of Britons have had worse sleep since the start of the lockdown, with 16–24 year olds most affected.

Eating cheese right before bed may give you more vivid dreams, but it won't affect the quality of your sleep - unlike arguing and checking your phone. Pictured, a restless night

Eating cheese right before bed may give you more vivid dreams, but it won’t affect the quality of your sleep – unlike arguing and checking your phone. Pictured, a restless night

SLEEP MYTHBUSTED

Eating cheese ruins sleep – FALSE

Sleeping late on weekends affects sleep – TRUE

Reading too late affects sleep – FALSE

Smoking lowers sleep quality – TRUE

Reading too late affects sleep – FALSE

Late meals keep you awake – TRUE

Naps ruin a night’s sleep – FALSE

Late night TV affects sleep – TRUE

Less than eight hours is bad – FALSE

Older people sleep less – TRUE

“ Sleep is just as important to good health as diet and exercise – and it is often easier – but many people believe in popular myths and rely on home sleep aids, which may not work, ” said Dr. Singh, who served as a “ sleep ambassador. ‘acts for Furniture Village.

While the general impression is that everyone needs eight hours of sleep, different people need different amounts

“Some people need less and others need more,” he continued.

“The common myth that eating cheese affects sleep actually has no bearing at all and in reality can be associated with more pleasant dreams.”

“While a small snack before bed is usually fine, a large meal can make it uncomfortable to lie down and keep you awake.”

“Electronics should also be avoided for at least an hour before bed, as the light emitted by devices can disrupt the sleep-inducing hormones our brains produce.”

“If you can’t sleep, it may help to do something else – like read, ideally on a non-electronic screen – for a short while before trying again.”

Dr Singh’s advice follows a study commissioned by Furniture Village, which questioned 2,000 British adults about the factors they believe caused a bad night’s sleep.

They found that people often complained that they were too hot or too cold at night, that they had to get up to go to the toilet and felt too stressed to fall asleep.

However, researchers also identified a number of common misconceptions. For instance, 14 percent of people said reading before bed was bad, while 11 percent said cheese should be avoided late at night.

However, according to Dr. Singh, there is little evidence to support the idea that cheese leads to vivid dreams and nightmares – which is, in fact, a source of B vitamins that can instead help you sleep well.

Likewise, he added, reading – as long as it’s not done on an electronic screen – can be a great way to unwind and lead you into ‘the arms of Morpheus’.

'Sleep is just as important to good health as diet and exercise - and it is often easier - but many people believe in popular myths and rely on home sleep aids, which may not work,' said Dr. Singh, in the photo. who acts as a 'sleep ambassador' for Furniture Village

'Sleep is just as important to good health as diet and exercise - and it is often easier - but many people believe in popular myths and rely on home sleep aids, which may not work,' said Dr. Singh, in the photo. who acts as a 'sleep ambassador' for Furniture Village

‘Sleep is just as important to good health as diet and exercise – and it is often easier – but many people believe in popular myths and rely on home sleep aids, which may not work,’ said Dr. Singh, in the photo. who acts as a ‘sleep ambassador’ for Furniture Village

The study – conducted by OnePoll – also found that about 43 percent of adults have trouble sleeping, and a third even seek advice on how to get more ‘closed eyes’.

In addition, the respondents indicated that it took, on average, about half an hour to fall asleep – and to wake up twice during the night.

Two out of five adults believe their sleep quality has gotten worse over the years – while 63 percent said they have trouble sleeping in beds, such as those in hotels or other people’s rooms, which they haven’t won.

The study also found that only 19 percent of people believe that a person’s overall diet affects sleep quality, and only 10 percent felt the same about smoking – despite both being true, added Dr. Singh adds.

“In these uncertain times, people are focused on both the quality and quantity of their sleep, and many are looking for strategies – which may or may not work – to help them sleep better,” said a Furniture Village spokesperson.

Dr Singh “has helpfully debunked some of the most common myths about sleep, such as eating cheese before bed and sleeping strictly eight hours each night.”

“In addition to bedtime routines and nighttime habits, we know that the quality of a person’s sleep can also be affected by his or her bed and mattress.”

More of Dr. Singh’s tips for a better night’s sleep can be found on the website Furniture Village website.

HOW TO DEAL WITH SLEEP PROBLEMS

Poor sleep can lead to worrying, and worrying can lead to poor sleep, according to the mental health charity Spirit.

Lack of closed eyes is considered a problem when it affects a person’s daily life.

As a result, they may feel anxious when they think that lack of sleep prevents them from rationalizing their thoughts.

Insomnia is also associated with depression, psychosis and PTSD.

Establishing a sleep routine where you go to bed and get up at the same time every day can help a person spend less time in bed and more time asleep.

Calming music, breathing exercises, visualizing pleasant memories, and meditation also encourage a closed eye.

Having tech free time for an hour or so before bed can also prepare you for sleep.

If you’re still having trouble falling asleep, it can be a good thing to keep a sleep diary where you record the hours you sleep and the quality of your closed eye on a scale of one to five.

Also note how often you wake up in the night, whether you need to take a nap, whether you have nightmares, your diet, and your general mood.

Sleep problems can be a sign of an underlying physical condition, such as pain.

Talking therapies can help you spot unhelpful thinking patterns that can affect sleep.

While medications, such as sleeping pills, can help break short bouts of insomnia and help you get back to a better sleep pattern.

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