Are you scared of wolf spiders? Whatever you do, do not go green

A study of 1,200 wolf spiders (in the picture) has revealed that creepy bugs, known for their excellent sight and keen hunting skills, are attracted to this color.

If you are afraid of spiders, do not use anything green, warn the scientists.

A study of 1,200 wolf spiders has revealed that these rare critters, known for their excellent sight and sharp hunting skills, are attracted to this particular color.

According to the scientists, the arachnids are essentially colorblind and are only sensitive to light at the green wavelength.

Spiders are attracted to the color green because their vision is better suited to this tone, making it much easier for arachnids to detect a prey or mate.

Until now, it was thought that the species did not give much importance to color.

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A study of 1,200 wolf spiders (in the picture) has revealed that creepy bugs, known for their excellent sight and keen hunting skills, are attracted to this color.

A study of 1,200 wolf spiders (in the picture) has revealed that creepy bugs, known for their excellent sight and keen hunting skills, are attracted to this color.

Wolf spiders, found in countries around the world, have four sets of eyes that they use to track their prey, quickly attacking anything that gets too close.

In a new study on the sight of the species, the researchers observed how the creepy bugs reacted to a video of courting spiders.

In the images, the scientists manipulated the background color, contrast and intensity.

They discovered that female spiders were more likely to respond to videos of men that contrasted sharply with their backgrounds.

They responded more strongly to the colored versions of the footage, which shows that color influences the movements of the spider.

Humans have trichromatic vision, which means they have retinal cells that are able to differentiate between red, green and blue.

Like most spiders, the wolf spiders (pictured) have four pairs of eyes, some of which have a reflective lens called a tapetum that shines with bright light

Like most spiders, the wolf spiders (pictured) have four pairs of eyes, some of which have a reflective lens called a tapetum that shines with bright light

Like most spiders, the wolf spiders (pictured) have four pairs of eyes, some of which have a reflective lens called a tapetum that shines with bright light

The wolf spiders have a dichromatic vision and can only see ultraviolet and green light, and it seems that the latter is their favorite.

The vision of the spiders makes them "basically colorblind," said lead researcher Professor George Uetz, a biologist at the University of Cincinnati.

But even though they do not read the color, they do read the intensity of the light, the scientists found, and since they can only detect the green color, they always address this color first.

This is because dams and couples stand out better against this color.

Professor Uetz said: "The assumption was that wolf spiders do not pay attention to color, but we discovered that that is not really true."

A surprising finding was that the spider view seems to adapt to changing seasons.

"What we find is that for female spiders, intensity matters more than color, but for male spies, color also matters, that's the weird finding, we did not expect that at all," said Professor Uetz.

IS IT A SPIDER FEAR IN OUR DNA?

Recent research has claimed that fear of spiders is a survival feature written in our DNA.

The scholar suggests that, dating back hundreds of thousands of years, the instinct to avoid arachnids developed as an evolutionary response to a dangerous threat.

It could mean that arachnophobia, one of the most oppressive phobias, represents a finely tuned survival instinct.

And it could be traced back to early human evolution in Africa, where spiders with very strong venom existed millions of years ago.

Study leader Joshua New, of Columbia University in New York, said: "Several species of spiders with specific venoms of powerful vertebrates populated Africa much earlier than hominids and have coexisted there for tens of millions of years.

"Humans were at perennial, unpredictable and significant risk of finding highly poisonous spiders in their ancestral environments."

"That makes a lot of sense, because when you go out early in the season when the spiders first come out, there are no leaves on the trees, so there's broad-spectrum light.

"But as the seasons change, the leaves come out and everything turns green.

"Spiders should be able to see the contrast against many colored backgrounds," he said.

Wolf spiders are found all over the world, and about 2,300 species are known.

They are mainly predators to sit and wait, knocking unsuspecting prey that pass too close.

Earlier this year, researchers revealed that wolf spiders also have a broad spectrum of personalities.

Once it was thought that their behavior was inflexible and integrated into their DNA, but researchers have discovered that the variable personality in individual spiders is due in part to the mating experience.

Wolf spiders live and hunt alone, but participate in a unique courtship dance, often employing multiple forms of communication, including reading chemical signals in spun silk to find out if she is receptive, has already mated or even if she has consumed other males in the past.

The researchers presented their work in June at the meeting of the American Arachnological Society at the University of Michigan.

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