Are we only five years from the turning point of the climate?

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Are we only five years from the turning point of the climate? A dangerous rise in global temperatures above the limit set by the UN could arrive by 2026, scientists warn

  • There is a good chance that annual temperature increases will exceed the levels set in the 2015 Paris Agreement
  • Report warned that a year between 2021 and 2025 turned out to be the hottest year on record
  • In 2020, the global average temperature was 1.2 ° C above pre-industrial levels

A dangerous rise in global temperature above the UN-set 1.5C limit could happen in just five years, scientists warn.

There is a 40 percent chance that annual temperature increases will exceed the levels set in the 2015 Paris Agreement, with which 196 countries have agreed, it is claimed.

The report published by the World Meteorological Organization also warns of a very high probability – a 90 percent chance – that at least one year between 2021 and 2025 will be the hottest on record, surpassing the record heat of 2016.

Global average temperatures of 1.5 ° C above the 19th century level are seen as a threshold beyond which the most dangerous effects of climate change will be felt.

Scientists warn that temperature rises above 1.5C will lead to more heat waves, extreme downpours, water shortages and droughts, greater economic losses and lower crop yields, higher sea levels and destruction of coral reefs.

A dangerous rise in global temperature above the 1.5C limit set by the UN could happen in just five years, scientists warn (Melting Ice Near Sirmilik National Park on Bylot Island Pictured)

A dangerous rise in global temperature above the 1.5C limit set by the UN could happen in just five years, scientists warn (Melting Ice Near Sirmilik National Park on Bylot Island Pictured)

In 2020, the global average temperature was 1.2 ° C above pre-industrial levels, making it one of the three hottest years on record.

The predictions appear in the WMO’s Global Annual to Decadal Climate update, which is led by the UK Met Office.

WMO Secretary General Professor Petteri Taalas said: “Rising temperatures mean more melting ice, higher sea levels, more heat waves and other extreme weather, and a greater impact on food security, health, the environment and sustainable development.

This study shows – with a high scientific level – that we are getting measurably and inexorably closer to the lower target of the Paris climate agreement.

In 2020, the global average temperature was 1.2 ° C above pre-industrial levels, making it one of the three warmest years on record (photo factory in Texas)

In 2020, the global average temperature was 1.2 ° C above pre-industrial levels, making it one of the three warmest years on record (photo factory in Texas)

‘It is yet another wake-up call that the world must make agreements more quickly to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.’

Under the Paris International Agreement, countries pledged to limit long-term temperature increases to 2 ° C above pre-industrial levels and to continue efforts to limit them to 1.5 ° C in order to mitigate the risks and consequences of climate change .

Current promised action by countries puts the world on track for 2-3 ° C warming by the end of the century.

Dr. Stephen Cornelius, WWF’s chief climate advisor, said: ‘Limiting global warming to 1.5 ° C is critical to avoiding the worst impacts of the climate crisis on humans and nature, but we know that without global warming action are at risk to achieve this. threshold in the coming years.

“With so much at stake, governments need to take urgent action to reduce harmful emissions.”

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