Home Australia Are Gen Z workers being rude? Nearly half of young workers believe being ten minutes late to work is as good as being on time, survey reveals

Are Gen Z workers being rude? Nearly half of young workers believe being ten minutes late to work is as good as being on time, survey reveals

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Nearly half of Gen Z (46 percent) 16- to 26-year-olds say being five to 10 minutes late is perfectly acceptable, as good as being on time (file image)

For many of us, being late is considered the height of rudeness: a sign of disrespect, even contempt, for those still waiting.

But not so for Generation Z, who believe that being ten minutes late is as good as being on time.

Nearly half (46 percent) of 16- to 26-year-olds say that being five to ten minutes late is perfectly acceptable, as good as being punctual.

However, tolerance for tardiness decreases with age.

About 39 percent of millennials (ages 27 to 42) forgive their friends or colleagues for arriving up to ten minutes late, falling to 26 percent for Generation X (ages 43 to 58) and 20 percent for Baby Boomers (59 and over). ).

Nearly half of Gen Z (46 percent) ages 16 to 26 say being five to 10 minutes late is perfectly acceptable, as good as being punctual (file image)

About 39 percent of millennials (ages 27 to 42) forgive their friends or colleagues for arriving up to ten minutes late, falling to 26 percent for Generation X (ages 43 to 58) and 20 percent for Baby Boomers (59 and over). )

About 39 percent of millennials (ages 27 to 42) forgive their friends or colleagues for arriving up to ten minutes late, falling to 26 percent for Generation X (ages 43 to 58) and 20 percent for Baby Boomers (59 and over). )

In fact, seven in ten Boomers said they have zero tolerance for any level of lateness, and 69 percent said “late is late.” Only 21 percent of Generation Z agreed with that.

It’s the latest example of a generational divide in social norms.

As The Mail on Sunday revealed earlier this year, an incredible 93 per cent of Gen Z job seekers said they simply hadn’t turned up for an interview.

And, being Generation Z, they have turned their inability to be punctual into a syndrome, with many claiming that “time blindness” is a condition related to attention deficit disorder.

In the latest study, online meeting company Meeting Canary asked 1,016 British adults about their attitudes towards punctuality.

Overall, only 38 per cent of all age groups agreed with the old saying that Match Of The Day’s Alan Shearer follows: “To be early is to be on time.” Being on time is being late. And being late is unacceptable.’

Match of the Day's Alan Shearer lives by the old saying:

Match of the Day’s Alan Shearer lives by the old saying: “To be early is to be on time.” Being on time is being late. And being late is unacceptable’

Across all ages, 33 percent would accept someone arriving five to ten minutes late. And nine percent consider being 11 to 15 minutes late acceptable.

Meeting Canary founder Laura van Beers said: “It seems that being ten minutes late now equates to being on time, especially for the younger generation, who are clearly more lenient about timekeeping.”

‘Their attitudes have provided a new interpretation of the meaning of punctuality and for them, being punctual is a flexible proposition, within reason.

“Older people are much more likely to arrive five minutes early to ensure they arrive on time, while younger people appear to be no more than ten minutes late to arrive on time.”

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