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Are doctors better at treating Covid-19? The death rate in the UK has FALLEN to a quarter of its peak level

The risk of dying from coronavirus after it was hospitalized has plummeted since the peak of the outbreak, suggesting that doctors are getting better at treating it.

An analysis from Oxford University shows that 6 percent of people admitted to hospitals in England with the virus in April died.

But the numbers show that on June 15, only 1.5 percent of Covid-19 patients died of the disease – a quarter of the level at the height of the crisis.

Oxford statisticians can’t figure out exactly why survival rates have fallen so sharply, but they think doctors may get better at treating the virus.

In April, there was no approved drug to treat Covid-19, a disease still shrouded in mystery after it jumped from animals to humans in late 2019.

But now the NHS now has two medications to treat critically ill patients: the Ebola remed and anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone.

A £ 5 steroid that has been around for decades, Dexamethasone was the first drug proven to reduce the death rate among hospital patients who needed oxygen.

The evidence around remdesivir is more mixed, but studies have shown it helps the most severely ill people who need ventilation.

There are also likely to be fewer people contracting the coronavirus in the hospital than at the height of the crisis, which may have contributed to the drop in mortality rates.

Hospital patients are inherently more likely to be sick or older and are therefore more likely to die if they contract it.

An analysis from Oxford University shows that 6 percent of people admitted to hospitals in England with the virus in April died.  But the numbers show that on June 15, only 1.5 percent of Covid-19 patients fell victim to the disease - a quarter of its peak level

An analysis from Oxford University shows that 6 percent of people admitted to hospitals in England with the virus in April died. But the numbers show that on June 15, only 1.5 percent of Covid-19 patients fell victim to the disease – a quarter of its peak level

Of 10,387 people hospitalized in England with Covid-19 on April 2, 644 died, resulting in a 6 percent death rate.

On June 15, 50 of the 3,270 hospital patients fell victim to the disease, representing about 1.5 percent.

The researchers considered whether those who were hospitalized were younger and therefore more likely to survive.

The number of new cases of coronavirus has ‘leveled off’ as data shows that between 1,900 and 3,200 people still catch Covid-19 in England every day

Every day, between 1,900 and 3,200 people catch the coronavirus in England, but according to data, the rate at which the outbreak is decreasing has leveled off.

The estimate is lower than last week, when two separate projections from experts from King’s College London and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) ranged from 3,200 to 3,800.

King’s College’s COVID Symptom Tracker app predicts that 1,978 people in England will be hit daily. The US, whose estimate is based on population swab testing, puts the figure at about 3,142.

But statisticians warned that the number of people infected with Covid-19 could even have increased – from 33,000 people two weeks ago to 51,000 people on June 21, about 0.09 percent of the population (one in 1100 people).

The ONS explained that the extremely small sample size – the number is only based on 14 positive tests, compared to 10 last week – likely affected the estimate. Experts briefly stopped saying the outbreak had returned and started to increase again, but instead said there was no evidence that it was growing or receding.

Government advisers today claimed that the R rate for the UK and England remains between 0.7 and 0.9 for the third consecutive week. But they admitted it could be 1.0 in the northwest. The number 10 scientific advisory panel, SAGE, also revealed today that the rate of growth – how the number of new daily cases changes by the day – is still between minus four and minus two percent.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson dramatically lifted the coronavirus lock this week, putting the country out of ‘hibernation’ – with a return for pubs, hairstyles and weddings and family and friends getting the green light to enter for the first time in months Meet.

The prime minister said he wanted to “make life easier” after an “incredibly difficult time” with bars, restaurants, cinemas and hairdressers in England returning to work starting July 4 – called “Super Saturday.”

But the data showed that there are actually more deaths now than 60 years of age than at the peak in early April.

Jason Oke, from the University of Oxford, was one of the statisticians behind the British analysis.

He told The Times that he was initially uncomfortable with the release of the analysis, adding, “We were on it. We’ve had a good discussion about trying to work out all the different ways we can be wrong.

“Then we thought we should publish it there – it’s what we observed. The caveat is that we don’t really understand why this is happening. But it happens. ‘

Other severely affected countries, including the US and Italy, are seeing similar trends in their death rates.

Dr. Okay admitted the newly approved drugs may be partly behind the trap, but he said other factors would come into play.

He warned that a less optimistic explanation could be that a large number of mild to moderately ill patients were rejected from hospitals in April.

He said, “Maybe at the beginning of the pandemic, when we thought we were going to be overrun, we only took the worst cases.”

If only the sickest patients – who are more likely to die from Covid – were treated, this could increase the death rate, even if there was no difference in the actual survival rate.

The total number of people dying with Covid-19 in English hospitals every week has fallen by 4.3 percent per day, meaning the number has halved every 16 days.

Deaths peaked at 899 on April 8, but have since fallen to just 50 in the week ending June 15.

The number of people hospitalized with coronavirus has also fallen from a high of 15,702 on April 10 to 2,891 on June 19 – meaning the number has halved every month.

Data show that in England, between 1,900 and 3,200 people contract the coronavirus every day, but according to data, the rate at which the outbreak is declining has leveled off.

The estimate is lower than last week, when two separate projections from experts from King’s College London and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) ranged from 3,200 to 3,800.

King’s College’s COVID Symptom Tracker app predicts that 1,978 people in England will be hit daily. The US, whose estimate is based on population swab testing, puts the figure at about 3,142.

But statisticians warned that the number of people infected with Covid-19 could even have increased – from 33,000 people two weeks ago to 51,000 people on June 21, about 0.09 percent of the population (one in 1100 people).

The ONS explained that the extremely small sample size – the number is only based on 14 positive tests, compared to 10 last week – likely affected the estimate.

King's College London's COVID Symptom Tracker app estimates that only 2,341 Britons are affected by the corona virus every day.  Last week they used this data to estimate that 3,612 people contracted the virus every day in the UK and about 4,942 people the week before.  The figure was higher than 11,000 a day a month ago

King's College London's COVID Symptom Tracker app estimates that only 2,341 Britons are affected by the corona virus every day.  Last week they used this data to estimate that 3,612 people contracted the virus every day in the UK and about 4,942 people the week before.  The figure was higher than 11,000 a day a month ago

King’s College London’s COVID Symptom Tracker app estimates that only 2,341 Britons are affected by the corona virus every day. Last week they used this data to estimate that 3,612 people contracted the virus every day in the UK and about 4,942 people the week before. The figure was higher than 11,000 a day a month ago

Experts briefly stopped saying the outbreak had returned and started to increase again, but instead said there was no evidence that it was growing or receding.

Government advisers today claimed that the R rate for the UK and England remains between 0.7 and 0.9 for the third consecutive week. But they admitted it could be 1.0 in the northwest. The number 10 scientific advisory panel, SAGE, also revealed today that the growth rate – how the number of new daily cases changes by the day – is still between minus four and minus two percent.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has dramatically unwound the coronavirus lock this week, putting the country out of ‘hibernation’ – with a return for pubs, hairstyles and weddings and family and friends getting the green light to meet indoors for the first time in months .

The prime minister said he wanted to “make life easier” after an “incredibly difficult time” with bars, restaurants, cinemas and hairdressers in England returning to work starting July 4 – called “Super Saturday.”

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