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Arctic Fox makes an epic 2000-mile hike from Norway to Canada in just 76 days while searching for food

Super fast Mr Fox! Arctic fox makes an epic 2000-mile trek from Norway to Canada in just 76 days when it searches for food on the sea ice

  • The fox averages 29 miles a day as it trekked from Svalbard to Ellesmere Island
  • At its fastest, the animal traveled 96 miles in one day on the ice of Greenland
  • The progress was followed by Norwegian polar researchers with a satellite follower

An arctic fox has traveled 2,179 miles over the sea ice from Norway to Canada – irresistibly leaving scientists behind.

The animal made the incredible journey in just 76 days – an average of 29 miles a day – making it the fastest moving speed ever recorded for this species, researchers said.

The fox's progress was followed by the Norwegian Polar Institute, which gave the female a satellite tracker.

Eva Fuglei from the polar institute told Norwegian broadcaster NRK: & # 39; In the beginning we couldn't believe our eyes.

This arctic fox, equipped with polar tracking devices with its tracking device, walked 2,179 miles across the sea ice from Norway to Canada - causing scientists & # 39; lightning-struck & # 39; were

This arctic fox, equipped with polar tracking devices with its tracking device, walked 2,179 miles across the sea ice from Norway to Canada – causing scientists & # 39; lightning-struck & # 39; were

This map shows the 2000-mile route from the fox from Norway to the Arctic Islands in the far north of Canada, across the Arctic ice

This map shows the 2000-mile route from the fox from Norway to the Arctic Islands in the far north of Canada, across the Arctic ice

This map shows the 2000-mile route from the fox from Norway to the Arctic Islands in the far north of Canada, across the Arctic ice

& # 39; We thought it might be dead, or there had been a boat, but there were no boats in the area. We were pretty touched with the thunderclap. & # 39;

The animal, known as a coastal or blue fox, had a tracking device installed when it was released in 2017.

She started her epic journey on March 26 last year, when she left Svalbard in Norway.

Within three weeks, she was in Greenland and arrived there on April 16, before continuing her journey and reaching Ellesmere Island in Canada on June 10.

At its fastest, the fox moved 96 miles one day as it moved across the ice sheet in northern Greenland.

The animal also took two breaks during its journey, which researchers attributed to the & # 39; inhospitable & # 39; climate and snowstorms.

A map published by Norwegian polar researchers shows the fox's progress over the Arctic ice from Spitsbergen in Svalbard, Norway, to Ellesmere Island in Canada

A map published by Norwegian polar researchers shows the fox's progress over the Arctic ice from Spitsbergen in Svalbard, Norway, to Ellesmere Island in Canada

A map published by Norwegian polar researchers shows the fox's progress over the Arctic ice from Spitsbergen in Svalbard, Norway, to Ellesmere Island in Canada

The distance is about 1,100 miles as the crow flies, but the fox took a more meandering route.

Scientists say they are in a & # 39; restricted area & # 39; stayed around Ellesmere after arriving there in June.

They have since lost sight of the animal because the satellite channel no longer works.

Researchers from the polar institute also emphasized how the ice sheet route was threatened by global warming.

& # 39; This is another example of how important sea ice is for animals in the Arctic & # 39 ;, said Norwegian Environment Minister, Ola Elvestuen.

& # 39; Global warming is terribly fast. We need to reduce emissions quickly to prevent sea ice from disappearing all summer.

& # 39; When the sea ice is falling as fast as around Svalbard, we need to provide extra protection for species and ecosystems against other environmental impacts. & # 39;

The findings are published in the journal Polar Research.

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