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Arctic explosions from Canada have begun to invade the United States and are on their way to the east coast

Various arctic explosions are expected to cause record-breaking shivers that run through parts of the central, eastern and southern United States until the middle of next week.

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The cold, which lasts mid-November, comes from a jet stream pattern that filters from Canada and into the states.

Almost two-thirds of the country is affected by the cold, starting in the north-central US before traveling north-east from Wednesday to Saturday.

Arctic explosions from Canada have begun to invade the United States and are on their way to the east coast

Arctic explosions from Canada have begun to invade the United States and are on their way to the east coast

& # 39; We are in a pattern where multiple cold waves come in from Canada and affect the Central and Eastern US, & # 39; told CNN meteorologist Taylor Ward W X Y Z.

& # 39; A wave of cold came in last week, another is moving in today and tomorrow, and the coldest blast is moving by far early next week. & # 39;

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These can be the coldest winds of the season so far, which are more like the dead winter than the fall.

AccuWeather illustrated the chill patterns that are expected to affect parts of the Northeast and South

AccuWeather illustrated the chill patterns that are expected to affect parts of the Northeast and South

AccuWeather illustrated the chill patterns that are expected to affect parts of the Northeast and South

For areas east of the Rocky Mountains, temperatures can drop between 20 and 30 degrees.

More surprising is the expectation that the temperature in parts of the South will fall drastically because they will face unexpected winter weather by Wednesday.

Highs are not expected to exceed the 30s in parts of Mississippi and Alabama, which is 10 degrees colder than the usual weather in mid-January.

Pictured: a Ventusky card from November 7 at 11 p.m. with the pole blast to the United States

Pictured: a Ventusky card from November 7 at 11 p.m. with the pole blast to the United States

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Pictured: a Ventusky card from November 7 at 11 p.m. with the pole blast to the United States

The weather leaves behind negative and unforeseen side effects.

In Kansas, reports of residents who smelled a strange odor started this week.

The National Weather Service in Kansas City revealed that the scent came from a cattle farm 300 miles away and was borne by the blast.

In other parts of the South, the cold puts an end to the current growing season because it is becoming more difficult to grow crops.

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& # 39; A widespread deadly freeze is likely to end the growing season in much of the south early next week & # 39 ;, AccuWeather & Dan's Dan Kottlowski told USA today.

People in a jet stream that went all the way from Texas to the Dakotas could see the temperatures drop to the teenagers.

The National Weather Service in Kansas City explained that the foul smell that residents of Kansas smelled was transported from a cattle farm 300 miles away

The National Weather Service in Kansas City explained that the foul smell that residents of Kansas smelled was transported from a cattle farm 300 miles away

The National Weather Service in Kansas City explained that the foul smell that residents of Kansas smelled was transported from a cattle farm 300 miles away

However, residents could see some relief in December by the end of November.

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& # 39; Although the extreme cold is expected to give way to a milder pattern to close November, it can take until the third week of November to remove the well below normal temperatures from the northern plains by the Great Lakes, & # 39; AccuWeather meteorologist Paul Said Pastelok.

This is a week after a previous polar explosion by the province was struck on Halloween night.

Pictured: a Ventusky map that shows the predicted status of the Arctic explosion on Wednesday, October 13

Pictured: a Ventusky map that shows the predicted status of the Arctic explosion on Wednesday, October 13

Pictured: a Ventusky map that shows the predicted status of the Arctic explosion on Wednesday, October 13

Chicago, Illinois, saw its earliest snowfall in 30 years on October 29.

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The National Weather Service said that Chicago received 1.2 centimeters of snow and that it was the first snowfall that collected more than one centimeter since October 20, 1989.

They also shared that the 1.2-inch snow broke a 96-year daily snowfall record that was initially set on October 30, 1923, by 0.7-inch.

The snowfall caused some suburbs and Chicago communities to postpone trick-or-treat until that Saturday.

Chicago residents were stunned on Wednesday when snow began to cover their neighborhoods

Chicago residents were stunned on Wednesday when snow began to cover their neighborhoods

Chicago residents were stunned on Wednesday when snow began to cover their neighborhoods

The northern suburb of Vernon Hills said they moved Halloween from Thursday to Saturday and followed the village of Winnetka.

& # 39; This decision was made at the request of residents to change the hours and in consultation with our police chief, & # 39; said the village.

& # 39; The intention is to maximize participation in Halloween parties while encouraging the safety of our youngest residents. & # 39;

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