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Architects design a bushfire proof luxury house from sea containers

Architects design a bushfire proof luxury home from sea containers – complete with a floating bed and outdoor shower

  • Two builders from California have made refractory houses from sea containers
  • The 14 m² design houses a bedroom, living room, dining room and bathroom
  • Containers are designed to temporarily house people who have lost houses in forest fires
  • More than 2,000 homes were destroyed throughout Australia during the summer infernos
  • Nicknamed the ‘Buhaus’, containers cost $ 142,795 AUD and can be adjusted

Construction specialists who are eager to help bushfire-ridden communities have created flame-resistant homes from marine containers to protect victims while their homes are being rebuilt.

After the Woolsey Fire destroyed nearly 1,650 buildings in California in November 2018, Los Angeles architect Doug Burdge joined forces with builder Nate Garnero to design a temporary fire-resistant home to protect residents in the event of a fire brigade lighting again.

Only 14m² in total, the ingenious design houses a bedroom, living room / dining room and spacious bathroom complete with shower, toilet and sink and costs $ 142,795 AUD per unit.

Their creation has been nicknamed ‘Buhaus’, a hybrid of Malibu – a beach town in Los Angeles, and Bauhaus, a German design movement that combines beauty with functionality.

Doug Burdge and Nate Garnero from Los Angeles created the Buhaus (photo), a temporary refractory home made from sea containers designed to protect people homeless by fires while their homes are being rebuilt

Doug Burdge and Nate Garnero from Los Angeles created the Buhaus (photo), a temporary refractory home made from sea containers designed to protect people who were made homeless by fires while their homes were being rebuilt

Floor to ceiling windows feel the living space considerably larger than the actual dimensions, while the bathroom opens onto a large terrace with a second outdoor shower.

The walls of the living room are covered with folding panels that open out to a table and a double bed with integrated storage.

Fire-resistant metal panels protect the exterior of the house and come in various styles, including matte black and sleek aluminum.

The walls of the living room are covered with folding panels that open out to a table and a double bed with integrated storage

The walls of the living room are covered with folding panels that open out to a table and a double bed with integrated storage

The walls of the living room are covered with folding panels that open out to a table and a double bed with integrated storage

The ultra-modern bathroom opens onto a large terrace with a second outdoor shower

The ultra-modern bathroom opens onto a large terrace with a second outdoor shower

The ultra-modern bathroom opens onto a large terrace with a second outdoor shower

Panels can be adjusted to shade the outside space and to protect the deck against bad weather.

The containers can be adapted to work off-grid using alternative energy sources that can be vital for survival in fire-sensitive regions.

Each unit takes three months to build, with shipment to Australia from later in 2020.

AUSTRALIA FIRES BY NUMBERS

– 10 million: The number of hectares of land that were burned in Australia this summer

1 billion: An estimated animals were killed in the devastation

– 250: The estimated number of endangered species has been eradicated by fire

29: Lives that have been lost throughout the nation

– $ 2 billion: The amount donated by the federal government to promote the recovery

– $ 250 million: Has been donated to a wide range of charities by the public

A pre-order waiting list is available on the Buhaus official website for people who want to register, including Australians who lost their homes to catastrophic forest fires in the last five months.

More than 2,000 homes were destroyed throughout Australia during the summer hell, which destroyed 10 million hectares of land and killed 29 people and more than a billion animals.

Earlier this month, officials warned that the reconstruction of Australian homes could take up to five years.

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