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Archaeologists have revealed the face of an Egyptian princess who lived nearly 4,000 years ago by meticulously assembling the wooden shards of her sarcophagus

Archaeologists have revealed the face of an Egyptian princess who lived nearly 4,000 years ago by meticulously assembling the wooden shards of her sarcophagus.

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The excerpts show the parable of a royal, possibly princess Hatshepset, daughter of Pharoah Ameny Qemau, who lived towards the end of the Middle Kingdom of Egypt.

Her image can be seen for the first time in the Egyptian Lost Pyramid program of Channel 4, which follows the two-year excavation and study of the final resting place of the royal palace.

The pyramid from the 13th dynasty was found in the royal necropolis of Dahshur, 20 miles south of Cairo, in 2017, and was turned out to have been looted by thieves after it was opened.

The coffin was split open so that the precious jewels could be torn from her corpse before the king's bones were scattered across the floor.

Archaeologists have revealed the face of an Egyptian princess who lived nearly 4,000 years ago by meticulously assembling the wooden shards of her sarcophagus

Archaeologists have revealed the face of an Egyptian princess who lived nearly 4,000 years ago by meticulously assembling the wooden shards of her sarcophagus

The fragments were found after the grave, possibly belonging to Princess Hatshepset, daughter of Pharoah Ameny Qemau, was opened in Dahshur, Egypt
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The fragments were found after the grave, possibly belonging to Princess Hatshepset, daughter of Pharoah Ameny Qemau, was opened in Dahshur, Egypt

The fragments were found after the grave, possibly belonging to Princess Hatshepset, daughter of Pharoah Ameny Qemau, was opened in Dahshur, Egypt

She was buried about 1.5 km from the grave of her father Ameny Qemau, who is buried in the black pyramid (photo)

She was buried about 1.5 km from the grave of her father Ameny Qemau, who is buried in the black pyramid (photo)

She was buried about 1.5 km from the grave of her father Ameny Qemau, who is buried in the black pyramid (photo)

Archaeologists from the American University of Cairo cleaned the pieces before they were placed in formation.

It reveals the face of a woman wearing a hathor wig, a powerful symbol of fertility that was very popular during the Middle Kingdom.

& # 39; Coffins normally had characteristics similar to the owner's, but idealized because they would look forever & # 39 ;, said Egyptologist Dr. Yasmin El Shazly.

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& # 39; Why would I want to be ugly forever? & # 39;

When the granite block was first relocated in 2017, it revealed a disturbed cemetery with shattered pieces of wood.

The box with the canopic jars, containing her liver, lungs, stomach and intestines, also remained. On the one hand is & # 39; daughter of the king & # 39; written in hieroglyphics.

The tomb complex, which once had a pyramid above it, was exposed in 2017. The pyramid eroded away after the precious limestone layer was removed, exposing the mud stones to the elements

The tomb complex, which once had a pyramid above it, was exposed in 2017. The pyramid eroded away after the precious limestone layer was removed, exposing the mud stones to the elements

The tomb complex, which once had a pyramid above it, was exposed in 2017. The pyramid eroded away after the precious limestone layer was removed, exposing the mud stones to the elements

American archaeologist Mark Lehner depicted with the black pyramid. He is going on the first filmed tour in the structure in the Egyptian Lost Pyramid program of Channel 4 which is broadcast on Sunday at 8 p.m.
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American archaeologist Mark Lehner depicted with the black pyramid. He is going on the first filmed tour in the structure in the Egyptian Lost Pyramid program of Channel 4 which is broadcast on Sunday at 8 p.m.

American archaeologist Mark Lehner depicted with the black pyramid. He is going on the first filmed tour in the structure in the Egyptian Lost Pyramid program of Channel 4 which is broadcast on Sunday at 8 p.m.

The claim that this is the grave of Princess Hatshepset comes from an inscription on the box with the jugs, reports Live science.

The mystery of two graves for one Pharoah

When the tomb was first discovered in Dahshur, it was initially attributed to Pharoah Amey Quema because of a symbol on the tomb.

This was bizarre because his actual tomb had already been found a mile away – which led to suggestions that it was a trap.

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However, when archaeologists opened the grave, they discovered human remains inside, and then a symbol on the box with the canopic pots that said the box contained the remains of the & # 39; pharoah & # 39; s daughter & # 39; contained.

This has led to the theory that it is the tomb of Princess Hatshepset.

At the end of the program, Egyptologist Dr. Chris Morgan claims that the tomb was invaded before the door was sealed, suggesting that possibly priests were involved.

She died towards the end of the Middle Kingdom, which dates from 2030 to 1782 BC.

As the period ended, Egypt lost control of Lower Nubia and experienced famine and political unrest.

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Although the 13th dynasty, in which Ameny Qemau briefly reigned, was reasonably prosperous, the second intervening period may, according to archaeologists, be impoverished.

Her tomb is less than a mile from that of her father, according to the program, which is nicknamed the & # 39; black pyramid & # 39; has got.

The structure itself now looks like a mess, while the precious limestone was removed from the outside, exposing the interior of mudstone to the elements.

The American archaeologist depicted in the black pyramid. It contained three rooms, for the Pharoah and his two wives it was also raided.

The American archaeologist depicted in the black pyramid. It contained three rooms, for the Pharoah and his two wives it was also raided.

The American archaeologist depicted in the black pyramid. It contained three rooms, for the Pharoah and his two wives it was also raided.

Below are winding corridors to confuse robbers, along with three separate hidden rooms for the Pharoah and his two queens.

Despite their efforts, these were also attacked by grave robbers. Only the box with one of the queen's canopic jugs remained, which could have contained her belly, lungs, liver and intestines.

Egypt & # 39; s Lost Pyramid will be broadcast on Channel 4 on Sunday at 8 p.m.

Who was princess Hatsjepset?

Little is known about the princess because of the raid on her tomb.

The box with the canopic jars is engraved with the name & # 39; Hatshepset & # 39 ;, Live Science reports, leading to the claim that the grave that was opened in 2017 was hers.

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The princess is the daughter of Pharoah Ameny Qemau, who ruled Egypt in the Middle Kingdom 3,800 years ago for two years.

Towards the end of this period, the country went through a turbulent period in which control of Lower Numbia was lost and famine was experienced.

The pyramid of Pharoah Ameny Qemau is the oldest smooth pyramid ever discovered, which has led archaeologists to deduce that this may have been the first attempt to build such a structure.

His daughter's grave was discovered in Dahshur, a well-preserved necropolis of important figures from ancient Egypt, about 25 miles south of Cairo.

After the Giza pyramid complex and the Valley of the Kings, it is probably the most famous resting place for the ancient Pharaohs.

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It is known as the location of the 341-foot Red Pyramid – the third largest remaining pyramid in Egypt.

It was built by Sneferu, a pharaoh who ruled 800 years before Ameny Qemau.

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