Archaeologists discover fossil human poop with remains of poisonous snake (including a FANG)

Yikesss! Archaeologists discover fossil human poop with the remains of a very poisonous snake eaten during supposed ritual (including a FANG)

  • Researchers analyzed samples from more than 1,000 coprolites in Texas
  • In only one they found the remains of an entire snake from the poisonous viper family
  • They found bones, scales and a single intact tusk in the fossilized human poop
  • Archaeologists have discovered the first example of an old human who has eaten a very poisonous snake – fangs and such.

    In a unique discovery in the Conejo hideout in Texas, researchers recovered the bones, scales and a single canine of an adder from fossilized human excrement.

    The remains of the precarious meal date from around 1500 years ago, and researchers suspected it was part of a ritual or ceremony.

    Although that may have been non-poisonous snakes, the discovery of the potentially deadly animal consumed in its entirety is probably the first of its kind. Given the presence of the bones and an intact tusk, the team says this was probably a matter of ceremony, not nutrition

    Although that may have been non-poisonous snakes, the discovery of the potentially deadly animal consumed in its entirety is probably the first of its kind. Given the presence of the bones and an intact tusk, the team says this was probably a matter of ceremony, not nutrition

    Researchers from Texas A&M University and Wichita State University have described the unusual findings in a new article published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports.

    In the study, the team analyzed samples from more than 1,000 coprolites (fossil poop) found in Texas in the 1960s.

    It is thought that the site once served as a latrine.

    The monsters revealed clues about the hunter-gatherer diet in the region over 1500 years ago – in the hot, dry climate, these people survived on small animals and what vegetation they could forage.

    In a unique discovery at the Conejo hideout in Texas, researchers recovered the bones, scales and a single canine of an adder from fossilized human excrement (pictured). The remains of the precarious meal date from around 1500 years ago

    In a unique discovery at the Conejo hideout in Texas, researchers recovered the bones, scales and a single canine of an adder from fossilized human excrement (pictured). The remains of the precarious meal date from around 1500 years ago

    In a unique discovery at the Conejo hideout in Texas, researchers recovered the bones, scales and a single canine of an adder from fossilized human excrement (pictured). The remains of the precarious meal date from around 1500 years ago

    Although that may have been non-poisonous snakes, the discovery of the potentially deadly animal consumed in its entirety is probably the first of its kind.

    In the study, the team analyzed samples from more than 1,000 coprolites (fossil poop) found in Texas in the 1960s. It is thought that the site once served as a latrine

    In the study, the team analyzed samples from more than 1,000 coprolites (fossil poop) found in Texas in the 1960s. It is thought that the site once served as a latrine

    In the study, the team analyzed samples from more than 1,000 coprolites (fossil poop) found in Texas in the 1960s. It is thought that the site once served as a latrine

    & # 39; Zoological analysis found the remains of a small rodent, apparently fully eaten, without any indication of preparation or cooking, & # 39; the researchers note in the newspaper.

    & # 39; In particular, the bones, scales and fangs of a snake in the Viperidae family were also recovered from the coprolite, which is the first direct archaeological evidence of the consumption of poisonous snakes known to the researchers. & # 39;

    As the researchers note, their examples were cut off by other examples of snakes digested by hunter-gatherers, along with other hard or sharp parts, such as bones or rattles.

    Given the presence of the bones and an intact tusk, the team says this was probably a matter of ceremony, not nutrition.

    But strangely enough, it is the only such sample of the entire set.

    & # 39; With the exception of the Viperidae residues, the coprolite proof is consistent with previous research at Conejo Shelter and the Lower Pecos region & # 39 ;, the researchers say.

    WHAT ARE COPROLITES?

    It's not just bones that can offer a rich history of the past of an ancient creature.

    Scientists also use something known as & # 39; coprolites & # 39; to bring together clues about ancient history.

    A coprolite is a fossilized stool that can provide insight into the diet and environment of animals millions of years ago.

    Copro means & # 39; manure & # 39; from the Greek word kopros.

    The & # 39; -lite & # 39; output is a common end for fossil or mineral terms, derived from the Greek word lithos, meaning stone

    The prehistoric stools are hardened over time and can sometimes resemble those of species that live today.

    Coprolites do not smell and are filled with mineral deposits such as calcium carbonates.

    Faeces usually decay quickly and so coprolites are rare to find.

    The largest known old coprolite came from a T. rex and is known as the & # 39; Saskatchewan coprolite & # 39; to the location in Canada where he was found. The

    At more than 30 cm in length, scientists believe that the T.rex would be the only carnivorous animal large enough to produce such a specimen.

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