Archaeologists discover a 3,200-year-old shrine to a knife-wielding SPIDER god

0

Archaeologists discover 3,200-year-old shrine to blade-wielding SPIDER GOD associated with rain and fertility in Peru

  • Temple is about 3,200 years old and dates back to Cupisnique culture
  • Most of the relic was destroyed by farmers trying to expand their land
  • The site is now registered and protected from further vandalism
  • I believed it was a temple where people prayed to water related gods

A gigantic 3,200-year-old mural depicting a spider god has been discovered in Peru.

The scene reveals an arachnid holding several knives and it is thought that locals prayed to the mysterious god believing the deity had control over fertility and rain.

Most of the relic was destroyed by farmers who tried to remove the mural in an attempt to expand their arable land.

Scroll down for video

The scene is said to depict an arachnid holding several knives and it is thought that locals prayed to the mysterious god and believed that the deity was related to fertility and rain

The scene is said to depict an arachnid holding several knives and it is thought that locals prayed to the mysterious god and believed that the deity was related to fertility and rain

Most of the relic was destroyed by farmers who tried to remove the mural in an attempt to expand their arable land.  Images of the mural created by local photographers reveal scars from the demolition attempt etched into the old mural

Most of the relic was destroyed by farmers who tried to remove the mural in an attempt to expand their arable land.  Images of the mural created by local photographers reveal scars from the demolition attempt etched into the old mural

Most of the relic was destroyed by farmers who tried to remove the mural in an attempt to expand their arable land. Images of the mural created by local photographers reveal scars from the demolition attempt etched into the old mural

Who were the Cupisnique people?

The Cupisnique people lived on the north coast of Peru around 2,000 – 1,000 BC.

They predate the Chavin culture and provided inspiration to these people.

Cupisnique culture stretched along the Peruvian coast from the Virú Valley to the Lambayeque drainage.

It had close ties with highland cultures and the inhabitants of the coastal valleys to the north and south.

Sometime after 500 BC the culture was integrated into the Chavín.

The discovery was made in the valleys of the province of Viru in the Peruvian department of Lambayeque.

Locals discovered the ancient site while using large machinery such as excavators to expand their avocado and sugar cane plantations.

Images from the mural reveal scars from the demolition attempt etched into the old artwork.

More than half of the original temple was demolished in November 2020, but a 15 x 6 meter patch survived.

Archaeologist Regulo Franco Jordan was informed of the site’s discovery by a friend and immediately set out to investigate.

“When I got there I was very surprised to see this impressive facade with geometric shapes,” he told local news.

The vibrant colors are believed to be made with ocher and with yellow, gray and white paint on a mud wall texture.

It is believed that the people who considered the spider to be a god belonged to the Cupisnique culture that started around 1000 BC. Peru’s northern coastline dominated.

Jordan concluded that the location of the burial site, a ‘huaca’, near a river is deliberate and likely indicates that the spider mural adorned a temple to water gods.

It is believed that the people who used the temple 2,300 years ago belonged to the Cupisnique culture who started around 1000 BC.  Peru's northern coastline dominated.

It is believed that the people who used the temple 2,300 years ago belonged to the Cupisnique culture who started around 1000 BC.  Peru's northern coastline dominated.

It is believed that the people who used the temple 2,300 years ago belonged to the Cupisnique culture who started around 1000 BC. Peru’s northern coastline dominated.

Archaeologist Regulo Franco Jordan was informed of the site's discovery by a friend and immediately investigated it.  'When I got there I was very surprised to see this impressive facade with geometric shapes,' he told local news

Archaeologist Regulo Franco Jordan was informed of the site's discovery by a friend and immediately investigated it.  'When I got there I was very surprised to see this impressive facade with geometric shapes,' he told local news

Archaeologist Regulo Franco Jordan was informed of the site’s discovery by a friend and immediately investigated it. ‘When I got there I was very surprised to see this impressive facade with geometric shapes,’ he told local news

Locals discovered the old site while using large machinery such as excavators to expand their avocado and sugar cane plantations and damaged the site

Locals discovered the old site while using large machinery such as excavators to expand their avocado and sugar cane plantations and damaged the site

Locals discovered the old site while using large machinery such as excavators to expand their avocado and sugar cane plantations and damaged the site

“What we have here is a shrine that would have been a ceremonial center thousands of years ago,” Jordan told Peruvian newspaper La República.

The spider on the sanctuary is associated with water and was an incredibly important animal in pre-Hispanic cultures, which lived according to a ceremonial calendar.

“It is likely that a special sacred water ceremony took place between January and March, when the rains came from the higher elevations.”

Officials were notified of the monument’s presence and it is now registered and protected from further damage.

Pictured, an aerial view of a pre-Hispanic mural dating back more than 3,200 years recently discovered at an ancient ceremonial site of the Cupisnique people, sitting in an agricultural field in the northern valley of Viru, about 500 km north of Lima

Pictured, an aerial view of a pre-Hispanic mural dating back more than 3,200 years recently discovered at an ancient ceremonial site of the Cupisnique people, sitting in an agricultural field in the northern valley of Viru, about 500 km north of Lima

Pictured, an aerial view of a pre-Hispanic mural dating back more than 3,200 years recently discovered at an ancient ceremonial site of the Cupisnique people, sitting in an agricultural field in the northern valley of Viru, about 500 km north of Lima

Advertisement