Archaeologists discover a & # 039; huge & # 039; huge & # 039; Roman settlement preserved under the Channel Islands

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A huge & # 39; Roman settlement has been unearthed in the Channel Islands.

The 3.7-acre settlement, the largest ever discovered on the Channel Islands and in nearby areas of France, was preserved by piles of sand for thousands of years.

Excavations at Longis Common in Alderney have revealed walls, a stone patio, pottery and coins.

Experts say the sand may have buried the island's first major settlement after its occupants moved to where the modern city is now.

The Roman settlement is based on a funerary site from the Iron Age dating from the 2nd century BC.

The Romans did not conquer Gaul – nowadays France – until about 56 BC, but the evidence uncovered by archaeologists suggests that they were carrying out trade in the nearby Channel Islands almost a century earlier.

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A "huge" Roman settlement has been found preserved under the sand in the Channel Islands

A bronze sestertius was found representing the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius of the 2nd century

A bronze sestertius was found representing the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius of the 2nd century

The coin is marked with a head and a human figure on different sides

The coin is marked with a head and a human figure on different sides

The Oxford University archaeologist, Dr. Philip De Jersey, said that the Iron Age cemeteries in the area are much richer than other burials in the Channel Islands.

The Oxford University archaeologist, Dr. Philip De Jersey, said that the Iron Age cemeteries in the area are much richer than other burials in the Channel Islands.

"It suggests that at least part of the population had some wealth and social status – not all of these were impoverished peasants who lived on the edge of the Roman Empire," he said.

Dr. Jason Monaghan, an archaeologist and museum director on the island of Guernsey, told MailOnline that the team hoped to study an Iron Age cemetery.

Instead, the team found the underground village by accident after beginning its excavation.

According to Dr. Monaghan, the site dates back to the 2nd century BC, about a century before the Romans successfully colonized France.

Evidence suggests that there was Roman commercial activity in the Channel Islands from 150 BC, before they finally settled on the island 100 years later after the empire conquered Gaul, which is now France.

Dr. Monaghan said that one of the unique things about the site was the way it was preserved.

Experts say the arena may have buried the first main settlement on the island after its occupants moved to where the modern city is now.

Experts say the arena may have buried the first main settlement on the island after its occupants moved to where the modern city is now.

Experts say the arena may have buried the first main settlement on the island after its occupants moved to where the modern city is now.

WHAT WAS ALDERNEY LIKE IN THE ROMAN ERA?

It is believed that Alderney was part of the Roman Empire for 400 years.

Alderney, or Riduna, was part of a group of islands that the Romans called Insulae Lenuri.

According to the findings, it is believed that the island was visited by boats from the Mediterranean that carried Roman pottery and wine as early as the 2nd century BC.

It is believed that Longis, where evidence of settlement was found, was a "natural harbor".

It is believed that the late Roman fort built near Longis was used to protect a naval base in the area.

Sometime after the fall of the Roman Empire, it is believed that the settlement at Longis was abandoned.

In medieval times, Santa Ana, the only city on the island, was occupied.

It is believed that Alderney (pictured) was part of the Roman Empire for 400 years. Alderney, or Riduna, was part of a group of islands that the Romans called Insulae Lenuri

It is believed that Alderney (pictured) was part of the Roman Empire for 400 years. Alderney, or Riduna, was part of a group of islands that the Romans called Insulae Lenuri

It is believed that Alderney (pictured) was part of the Roman Empire for 400 years. Alderney, or Riduna, was part of a group of islands that the Romans called Insulae Lenuri

Excavations at Longis Common in Alderney revealed walls, a stone patio, pottery and coins (pictured)

Excavations at Longis Common in Alderney revealed walls, a stone patio, pottery and coins (pictured)

Excavations at Longis Common in Alderney revealed walls, a stone patio, pottery and coins (pictured)

In 2011, it was discovered that a building near the new settlement, known as the Convent of nuns, was of Roman origin and dates from the fourth century AD.

In 2011, it was discovered that a building near the new settlement, known as the Convent of nuns, was of Roman origin and dates from the fourth century AD.

In 2011, it was discovered that a building near the new settlement, known as the Convent of nuns, was of Roman origin and dates from the fourth century AD.

Excavations at Longis Common on the small Channel Island of Alderney revealed the hidden settlement

Excavations at Longis Common on the small Channel Island of Alderney revealed the hidden settlement

Excavations at Longis Common on the small Channel Island of Alderney revealed the hidden settlement

"Most Roman cities, when they fell in ruins, the locals cut off all the stones to build their farms and cathedrals and things," he said.

"What has happened at Longis is that the buildings have stopped working, the sand has been spilled and buried under three or four feet of sand, everyone would have forgotten about them."

In 2011, it was discovered that a building near the new settlement, known as the Convent of nuns, was of Roman origin and dates from the fourth century AD.

The walls of the tower were nine feet (2.8 meters) thick and the tower was about 58 square feet (18 square meters).

Dr. Monaghan said at the time: "It probably protected the entrance to Longis Bay, the only natural harbor of Alderney, and I think they probably would have based a couple of Roman warships there.

"It's only eight miles (12.8 km) up to the French coast, you can see it from there, and if you want to control that waterway and prevent pirates or anyone else from passing, that's the ideal place to do it.

"The fort protects the beach because we know that there was also a settlement, probably a small Roman town or a small town under the sand of Longis."

Additional research found that it is one of Britain's best-preserved small Roman forts.

Archaeologists say that the new settlement may have been connected to the fort at some point in its history.

Archaeologists believe that the new village is connected to the Iron Age cemeteries in the area, which are much richer than other burials in the Channel Islands.

Archaeologists believe that the new village is connected to the Iron Age cemeteries in the area, which are much richer than other burials in the Channel Islands.

Archaeologists believe that the new village is connected to the Iron Age cemeteries in the area, which are much richer than other burials in the Channel Islands.

In 2011, it was discovered that a building near the new settlement, known as the Nunnery, was of Roman origin from the 4th century AD. Additional research found that it is one of the best preserved small Roman forts in Britain

In 2011, it was discovered that a building near the new settlement, known as the Nunnery, was of Roman origin from the 4th century AD. Additional research found that it is one of the best preserved small Roman forts in Britain

In 2011, it was discovered that a building near the new settlement, known as the Nunnery, was of Roman origin from the 4th century AD. Additional research found that it is one of the best preserved small Roman forts in Britain

The site may extend through 3.7 acres, making it the largest settlement found on the Channel Islands and nearby areas of France.

The site may extend through 3.7 acres, making it the largest settlement found on the Channel Islands and nearby areas of France.

The site may extend through 3.7 acres, making it the largest settlement found on the Channel Islands and nearby areas of France.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT IRON AGE BRITAIN?

The Iron Age in Britain began around 800 BC and ended in 43 AD when the Bronze Age began.

As the name suggests, this period saw large-scale changes thanks to the introduction of iron working technology.

During this period, the population of Great Britain probably exceeded one million.

This was possible thanks to new forms of agriculture, such as the introduction of new varieties of barley and wheat.

The invention of the iron-tipped plow made it possible to grow crops in heavy clay soils for the first time.

Some of the main advances during the process included the introduction of the potter's wheel, the lathe (used to work the wood) and the rotary mill to grind grain.

There are almost 3,000 Iron Age forts in the United Kingdom. Some were used as permanent settlements, others were used as meeting places, commerce and religious activities.

At that time, most people lived on small farms with extended families.

The standard house was a circular house, made of wood or stone with thatched roof or grass.

The burial practices were varied, but it seems that most people were eliminated by "excarnación", which means that they were deliberately exposed.

There are also some preserved marshy bodies of this period, which show evidence of violent deaths in the form of ritual and sacrificial sacrifice.

Towards the end of this period there was a growing Roman influence from the western Mediterranean and southern France.

It seems that before the Roman conquest of England in 43 AD they had already established connections with many tribes and could have exerted a certain degree of political influence.

After 43 AD, all of Wales and England under Hadrian's Wall became part of the Roman Empire, while the Iron Age life in Scotland and Ireland continued for longer.

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