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Archaeologists claim that a series of mysterious man-made stones under water from a European lake are 5000 years old (photo)

Archaeologists claim that a series of mysterious man-made stones submerged under the surface of a European lake are 5,000 years old.

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Local media report that the so-called & # 39; Swiss Stonehenge & # 39; 15 feet at the foot of Lake Constance and is a neolithic remnant, with stones varying in size up to about 100 centimeters wide.

The artificial piles of stones were found on the Swiss side of the lake, a water surface of 207 square miles on the border of Switzerland, Germany and Austria.

Each stone lay at regular distances and ran completely parallel to the Swiss coastline.

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Archaeologists claim that a series of mysterious man-made stones under water from a European lake are 5000 years old (photo)

Archaeologists claim that a series of mysterious man-made stones under water from a European lake are 5000 years old (photo)

Local media report that the so-called & # 39; Swiss Stonehenge & # 39; (photo) 15 feet at the foot of Lake Constance and is a neolithic relic, with stones varying in size up to about 100 centimeters wide
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Local media report that the so-called & # 39; Swiss Stonehenge & # 39; (photo) 15 feet at the foot of Lake Constance and is a neolithic relic, with stones varying in size up to about 100 centimeters wide

Local media report that the so-called & # 39; Swiss Stonehenge & # 39; (photo) 15 feet at the foot of Lake Constance and is a neolithic relic, with stones varying in size up to about 100 centimeters wide

WHAT IS THE SWISS STONE?

Archaeologists have discovered man-made piles of stones on the Swiss side of Lake Constance.

About 15 feet below the surface of the 207-square-mile lake on the border of Switzerland, Germany, and Austria.

Local media report that the so-called & # 39; Swiss Stonehenge & # 39; 15 feet at the foot of Lake Constance and is a neolithic remnant, with stones varying in size up to about 100 centimeters wide.

A ship equipped with an excavator with a 15 meter long arm removed material along the stones and revealed the stones.

In the following months, further research will be conducted in the hope of discovering more about the artifacts, which will be analyzed by an international team of researchers.

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A spokesperson for the archeology office of the Swiss canton of Thurgau described the findings as & # 39; sensational & # 39; after carrying out excavations from the bottom of the lake.

A ship equipped with an excavator with a 15 meter long arm removed material along the stones to reveal them for study.

Analysis of how they were placed shows that they were put down by people and not by nature, archaeologists claim.

Using underwater georadar developed by the Technical University of Darmstadt in Germany, the team of scientists managed to study the sediment and rock deposits of the lake in search of the origin and purpose of the formations.

The Archeology Office wrote: & # 39; With high-frequency electromagnetic pulses, the hidden layer of the bottom of the lake near the stone structures was recorded. & # 39;

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& # 39; It is clear that the stones are up to 40 centimeters in size on the post-glacial, striped lake deposits and clearly above the underlying upper edge of the moraine (a glacially shaped accumulation of non-consolidated glaze waste).

& # 39; For example, it has now been scientifically proven that the cairns do not originate naturally from the glacier, but are piled up by human hands. & # 39;

The artificial piles of stones were found on the Swiss side of Lake Constance, a lake of 207 square kilometers on the border of Switzerland, Germany and Austria, and more information about them is being worked on

The artificial piles of stones were found on the Swiss side of Lake Constance, a lake of 207 square kilometers on the border of Switzerland, Germany and Austria, and more information about them is being worked on

The artificial piles of stones were found on the Swiss side of Lake Constance, a lake of 207 square kilometers on the border of Switzerland, Germany and Austria, and more information about them is being worked on

Each stone was at regular intervals and ran completely parallel to the Swiss coastline at a depth of about 15 feet

Each stone was at regular intervals and ran completely parallel to the Swiss coastline at a depth of about 15 feet

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Each stone was at regular intervals and ran completely parallel to the Swiss coastline at a depth of about 15 feet

Analysis of how the rocks were placed (photo) shows that they were placed there by people and not by nature, archaeologists claim

Analysis of how the rocks were placed (photo) shows that they were placed there by people and not by nature, archaeologists claim

Analysis of how the rocks were placed (photo) shows that they were placed there by people and not by nature, archaeologists claim

A spokesperson for the archeology office of the Swiss canton of Thurgau described the findings as & # 39; sensational & # 39; after carrying out extensive excavations at the bottom of the lake

A spokesperson for the archeology office of the Swiss canton of Thurgau described the findings as & # 39; sensational & # 39; after carrying out extensive excavations at the bottom of the lake

A spokesperson for the archeology office of the Swiss canton of Thurgau described the findings as & # 39; sensational & # 39; after carrying out extensive excavations at the bottom of the lake

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The spokesperson added: & # 39; The first results produced using carbon dating show that the stones in area 5 were placed there about 5500 years ago in the neolithic period. & # 39;

In the following months, further research will be conducted in the hope of discovering more about the artifacts, which will be analyzed by an international team of researchers.

Initially it was unclear whether the stones were natural formations from the remains of a glacier that was in the area 18,000 years ago.

The researchers originally suspected that the Bronze Age formations date from around 1000 BC.

Pictured @: a piece of poplar wood that has been collected by the divers and that may have been used as part of the construction or excavation of the rocks. Experts have confirmed that these mysterious piles of stones - compared to an underwater Stonehenge - found at the bottom of Lake Constance are much older than previously thought

Pictured @: a piece of poplar wood that has been collected by the divers and that may have been used as part of the construction or excavation of the rocks. Experts have confirmed that these mysterious piles of stones - compared to an underwater Stonehenge - found at the bottom of Lake Constance are much older than previously thought

Pictured @: a piece of poplar wood that has been collected by the divers and that may have been used as part of the construction or excavation of the rocks. Experts have confirmed that these mysterious piles of stones – compared to an underwater Stonehenge – found at the bottom of Lake Constance are much older than previously thought

Using underwater georadar technology (photo) developed by the Technical University of Darmstadt in Germany, the team of scientists succeeded in studying the sediment and rock deposits of the lake in search of the origin and purpose of the formations

Using underwater georadar technology (photo) developed by the Technical University of Darmstadt in Germany, the team of scientists succeeded in studying the sediment and rock deposits of the lake in search of the origin and purpose of the formations

Using underwater georadar technology (photo) developed by the Technical University of Darmstadt in Germany, the team of scientists succeeded in studying the sediment and rock deposits of the lake in search of the origin and purpose of the formations

Pictured: the research team at Lake Constance where the neolithic rocks were discovered. Experts have confirmed that these mysterious piles of stones on Lake bottom that have been compared to an "underwater Stonehenge" caused by man

Pictured: the research team at Lake Constance where the neolithic rocks were discovered. Experts have confirmed that these mysterious piles of stones on Lake bottom that have been compared to an "underwater Stonehenge" caused by man

Pictured: the research team at Lake Constance where the neolithic rocks were discovered. Experts have confirmed that these mysterious piles of rocks at Lake bottom have been compared to an & # 39; underwater Stonehenge & # 39; made by humans

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Currently there are various theories about the purpose of the stones, such as that they served as flood defenses, burial mounds or signposted transport routes.

Urs Leuzinger, a researcher of the project, estimates that the cairns were along the coastline at the time of construction or even in shallow water.

He said: & # 39; I have never experienced anything like this. When we dig something up, we usually know what it's all about. & # 39;

He said his team & # 39; is not going to compete with the original Stonehenge & # 39; and said the name & # 39; was chosen by German media & # 39; and not by archaeologists.

He said, however, that there are some similarities with the Wiltshire monument because it required an equally impressive performance from prehistoric people to transport such stones.

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Dr. Leuzinger said: & # 39; Our 170 cairns of 500 cubic meters of stones finally all bring quite a bit to the shores of Lake Constance. & # 39;

The cairns were first discovered in 2015 by the Institute for Lake Research in the town of Langenargen in the southwestern German state of Baden-Wuerttemberg.

It is thought that they would have been near a settlement of lake dwellings that are much deeper under water, perhaps close to what was once a prehistoric coastline and that have yet to be discovered, according to the Thurgau Office for Archeology.

But they added: & # 39; It may also be that the lake dwellings have already been eroded away by the erosion over the years. & # 39;

Divers who have investigated the site have discovered more about the rocks, including their age. There are currently several theories about the purpose of the stones, such as serving as flood defenses, burial mounds or signposted transport routes

Divers who have investigated the site have discovered more about the rocks, including their age. There are currently several theories about the purpose of the stones, such as serving as flood defenses, burial mounds or signposted transport routes

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Divers who have investigated the site have discovered more about the rocks, including their age. There are currently several theories about the purpose of the stones, such as serving as flood defenses, burial mounds or signposted transport routes

A ship equipped with an excavator with a 15 meter long arm removed material along the stones and revealed the stones (photo)

A ship equipped with an excavator with a 15 meter long arm removed material along the stones and revealed the stones (photo)

A ship equipped with an excavator with a 15 meter long arm removed material along the stones and revealed the stones (photo)

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