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<pre><pre>Eddy Cue says that Apple does not dictate the content restrictions for the original TV shows

Today Apple has renewed apple.com/privacy, are web pages that explain what the company does to protect your privacy. They are much easier to read, so you can browse through a list of individual Apple apps to see what each does to protect your personal information.

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Previously, if you looked at that URL, you would find Apple's generic explanation of how it protected your personal information, followed by a lot of info in a confusing order, with a hard-to-read two-column layout at thinnest window sizes. Apple's new & # 39; s pages still lead with a generic privacy statement, but it's now much easier to understand what each app does to protect your privacy per app.

Here are some screenshots of what the new privacy page & # 39; s look like:

It looks like Apple hasn't made any policy changes on the new & # 39; s pages. Instead, this renewal is good for organizing information that Apple has shared in one place in the past (including the privacy protection it has added to iOS 13 and macOS Catalina). I was pleased to see that Apple contained clear information about its policy for listening to Siri recordings (and how to delete that information), but I was disappointed that the company did not say anything new to clear up the recent controversy about how Safari checks URLs on blacklists from companies such as Google and Tencent.

The new pages look like Nest's privacy page in splitting up information in a well-organized, visual format, although Google's tone makes the pages look more like a list of obligations than Apple's actual style. But both are more interesting to read than Frequently asked questions about Amazon privacy for its Echo devices.

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Even if there's not much new with Apple's updated pages & # 39; s, they are still a useful way to see everything the company does for user privacy. And it makes sense that the company is so powerful to present the information properly, because it wants to be the only technology company that you trust.