Apple says it is monitoring the Infowars application for content …

Apple agrees with its decision to keep the Alex Jones Infowars Conspiracy Theory available for download on the App Store.

After removing several of Jones' podcasts from his digital store earlier this week, Apple was criticized for abandoning the Infowars app.

On Wednesday, the company finally broke its silence and said the application remains in the App Store because it has not been found to violate content policies.

The official Infowars app became the third most downloaded news application in the App Store this week after Apple withdrew access to some of Jones' podcasts.

Apple was one of several technology companies that cracked down on the content of the conspiracy theorist in consecutive purges on Sunday and Monday, joining Spotify, YouTube and Facebook to remove several pages and podcasts from Jones.

Despite the moves of its rivals, Twitter has said it will not ban Jones from his site.

Apple agrees with its decision to keep the Alex Jones Infowars Conspiracy Theory available for download on the App Store. After eliminating several of Jones' podcasts from his digital store, Apple was criticized for abandoning the Infowars application, which is shown above in the app store this week.

Apple agrees with its decision to keep the Alex Jones Infowars Conspiracy Theory available for download on the App Store. After eliminating several of Jones' podcasts from his digital store, Apple was criticized for abandoning the Infowars application, which is shown above in the app store this week.

Apple had said that podcasts violated the company's rules against hate speech, but did not explain why the application remained available until it finally issued a statement on Wednesday.

"We strongly support all the points of view represented in the App Store, provided that the applications are respectful with users with different opinions, and we follow our clear guidelines, ensuring that the App Store is a safe market for all," Apple told Reuters in a statement.

Jones podcasts differ from the Infowars application in a key way.

The podcast application allowed access to an extensive list of previous episodes, submitting all those past episodes to the Apple content rules.

The Infowars application contains only retransmissions of the current day's episodes, submitting a much smaller set of content to the rules.

Apple said it regularly monitors all applications for content violations.

"We continue to monitor applications for violations of our guidelines and if we find content that violates our guidelines and is harmful to users, we will remove those apps from the store as we did before," Apple said.

  The Infowars application contains only retransmissions of the current day's episodes, submitting a much smaller set of content to the rules. Remains in the App Store despite Apple's ban on Jones podcasts

The Infowars application contains only retransmissions of the current day's episodes, submitting a much smaller set of content to the rules. Remains in the App Store despite Apple's ban on Jones podcasts

WHO IS ALEX JONES?

Alex Jones is a controversial radio and podcast presenter based in Austin, Texas.

Jones says his "InfoWars" programs, which are broadcast by radio, YouTube and other platforms, reach at least 70 million people a week.

Among other claims, he has described the massive shooting of Sandy Hook Elementary School 2012 as a hoax.

He was sued for defamation by the families of some of the children killed in that attack, which left 20 children and six adults dead.

Among other claims, Alex Jones (file photo) has called the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School 2012 a hoax. He was sued for defamation by the families of some of the children killed in that attack, which left 20 children and six adults dead

Among other claims, Alex Jones (file photo) has called the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School 2012 a hoax. He was sued for defamation by the families of some of the children killed in that attack, which left 20 children and six adults dead

Now he admits that the shooting took place, but he says that his demands were for freedom of expression. He has sought to dismiss the claim.

Jones has also claimed that the attacks of September 11, 2001 in New York and Washington were organized by the United States government.

While it began to transmit its shows in 1999, the profile of Jones has extended from the extreme right in the last years.

While running for president in 2015, Donald Trump told Jones that his reputation was "incredible."

The parent company of Google Alphabet Inc, Facebook Inc. and Spotify Technology SA also removed some of this week's content that had been produced by Jones.

Google has not said why the Infowars app, which offers live broadcasts and articles, was not removed in its app store as part of the actions.

Twitter has provoked public protests for not eliminating Jones' account.

The company is responding by streamlining a review of its content policies, according to an internal email that CEO Jack Dorsey shared on Twitter on Wednesday.

The message noted that Twitter would have taken action against Jones if it had published the same content in its service as it did on Facebook and YouTube.

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