Apple CEO Tim Cook says that Spotify is "exhausting the humanity of music" # 039;

Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, lashed out at Spotify for "draining the humanity of music". Apple fears that the transmission of music depends too much on the algorithms, according to Cook, alluding to the numerical approach to create playlists initiated by Spotify (file photo)

Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, lashed out against Spotify and other music rivals in streaming to & # 39; drain the humanity of music & # 39;.

Apple is concerned that modern music relies too much on computer algorithms, Cook said.

This sharp observation refers to the number-based approach to creating playlists initiated by Spotify and then adopted by other music streaming services, such as Tidal.

The CEO of Apple, 57, said that Apple Music, the biggest competitor of Spotify, uses humans to build their playlists.

According to Cook, this approach represents & # 39; art & crafts & # 39; about & # 39; bits & bytes & # 39;

Currently, Spotify has 170 million monthly active users, of which 75 million are paid subscribers. Apple Music recently crossed 40 million paid monthly subscribers.

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Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, lashed out at Spotify for "draining the humanity of music". Apple fears that the transmission of music depends too much on the algorithms, according to Cook, alluding to the numerical approach to create playlists initiated by Spotify (file photo)

Apple's CEO, Tim Cook, lashed out at Spotify for "draining the humanity of music". Apple fears that the transmission of music depends too much on the algorithms, according to Cook, alluding to the numerical approach to create playlists initiated by Spotify (file photo)

Cook's comments reflect Apple's old criticism of how Spotify suggests music and creates playlists for its users.

A popular feature of music streaming platforms are the public playlists they create based on moods, genres and more.

Most build these through complex algorithms that combine listening histories and personal playlists of thousands of different users.

Apple Music, which has around 50 million users of the 170 million Spotify, prefers to use human curators to create playlists.

Speaking to Fast Company, Cook said the company was making a conscious attempt to bring a human touch to its playlists.

He said: "We are worried that humanity will run out of music, that it will become a world of bits and bytes instead of art and crafts."

Cook noted that Apple Music, Spotify's biggest competitor, uses humans to build their playlists, an approach he calls "art and crafts". about & # 39; bits & bytes & # 39; (stock image)

Cook noted that Apple Music, Spotify's biggest competitor, uses humans to build their playlists, an approach he calls "art and crafts". about & # 39; bits & bytes & # 39; (stock image)

Cook noted that Apple Music, Spotify's biggest competitor, uses humans to build their playlists, an approach he calls "art and crafts". about & # 39; bits & bytes & # 39; (stock image)

Apple Music is locked in a fierce battle with Spotify to take the crown as the number one music streaming site in the world.

Apple has a lot to do: it has 50 million free trial listeners and payments, while Spotify only has 75 million paying customers.

But the Cupertino firm is quickly making its way into its biggest rival considering the launch of Apple Music just three years ago.

Apple also has an advantage over rivals in that its status as the world's most valuable company means that it has not had to worry about profitability.

Apple Music is locked in a fierce battle with Spotify to take the crown as the number one music streaming site in the world (stock image)

Apple Music is locked in a fierce battle with Spotify to take the crown as the number one music streaming site in the world (stock image)

Apple Music is locked in a fierce battle with Spotify to take the crown as the number one music streaming site in the world (stock image)

WHAT DO THE MUSIC STREAMING SERVICES DO AND WHAT DO YOU RECEIVE FOR YOUR MONEY?

Spotify

Price:

Free with ads and random play just to play

The cost of the premium is £ 9.99 ($ ​​9.99) per month

Premium features:

It lets you listen to albums from start to finish

There are no ads that interrupt your enjoyment

It allows you to download music

Youtube Music

Price:

Free with ads

The premium cost is $ 9.99 (or £ 9.99 if YouTube follows Spotify and Apple prices)

Premium features:

There are no ads that interrupt your enjoyment.

It allows you to download music

Remixes, covers and live tracks exclusive to YouTube

Apple Music

Price:

£ 9.99 ($ ​​9.99) per month

Characteristics

Integrates with your existing music collection

Connect with your favorite bands

The largest music library currently

It allows you to download music

"We're not in that for the money," Cook told Fast Company.

The rise of music streaming services has provided a huge boost to the music industry, driving listeners away from illegal downloads, which paralyzed the industry in the late 1990s and mid-2000s.

According to figures published last week by YouGov, only one in 10 Britons gets their music from an illegitimate source, 18% less five years earlier.

Of those who still download their songs illegally, more than a fifth (22 percent) say they will probably switch to a broadcast source in the next five years.

The researchers said the statistics showed "encouraging signs" that broadcast services could one day eradicate online music piracy.

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