Anti-satellite rocket test has increased the chance that the ISS will be hit by rubble up to 49%

Space troop of the anti-satellite missile test in India threatens to pierce the ISS, claims the Russian space agency

  • More than 400 pieces of rubble appeared after India tested the weapon in March
  • Sergey Krikalyov of the Russian space agency Roscomos gave the new warning
  • His comments were made during a session of the Russian Academy of Sciences
  • He claims that US calculations have revealed the increased risk of a pervasive attack
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Space junk from a satellite shot by India in March means that the international space station is more likely to be penetrated by space debris than previously thought.

Sergey Krikalyov – executive director of the Russian Space Agency's manned space program – issued the warning, according to reports from TASS news agency.

More than 400 pieces of rubble appeared after India tested an anti-satellite interception missile launched by the nation in March.

NASA previously estimated that the rocket test had increased the chance that space troops that hit the International Space Station (ISS) would be 44 percent.

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India has wanted to downplay the effects of the arms launch, claiming that debris would burn in the Earth's atmosphere.

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Space junk from a satellite that has been shot down means that the international space station (photo) is more likely to be pierced by space debris than previously thought. Sergei Krikalyov of the Russian space agency issued the warning (stock image)

Space junk from a satellite that has been shot down means that the international space station (photo) is more likely to be pierced by space debris than previously thought. Sergei Krikalyov of the Russian space agency issued the warning (stock image)

Mr Krikalyov made the comments during a session of the space academy of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

He said: & # 39; The Americans have done calculations about the probability that the station will be pierced because more debris appears and is spread.

& # 39; There are numerical estimates that increase the chance of a leak by around five percent. & # 39;

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The Prime Minister of India, Narendra Modi, said in a television speech to the nation on March 27 that the country's air force had successfully tested its own anti-satellite weapon by shooting a satellite in a low orbit around the Earth.

As Modi noted, the tests have enabled India to become a member of the world's space missions club, including the United States, Russia, and China.

The interceptor rocket, developed by India & # 39; s Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO), was launched from a test series on the island of Abdul Kalam in the Gulf of Bengal.

The satellite shot by an interception missile was a space vehicle produced by India in its own country.

The launch of Interceptor rocket from Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD)

The launch of Interceptor rocket from Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD)

The rocket was launched from the island of A P J Abdul Kalam in Odisha
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The rocket was launched from the island of A P J Abdul Kalam in Odisha

More than 400 pieces of rubble appeared after India tested an anti-satellite interception missile launched by the nation in March. This image shows the launch of the A P J Abdul Kalam island in Odisha, which the prime minister said is one of the super powers of space

US officials claimed at the end of March that debris from the Indian test would probably burn within a few weeks and & # 39; disappear & # 39 ;.

This came in the midst of an exclamation of its potential to add to the already urgent issue of space debris that revolves around the planet.

There are an estimated 170 million pieces of so-called & # 39; space waste & # 39; – abandoned after missions that can be as large as spent rocket stages or as small as paint flakes – in orbit next to about $ 700 billion (£ 555 billion) in infrastructure.

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In 2007, China destroyed a satellite in a polar orbit, creating the largest orbital debris in history, with more than 3,000 objects, according to the Secure World Foundation.

Because the impact height was more than 800 km (500 miles), many of the resulting chips remained in orbit.

The comments came after an estimate by the Indian top scientist that the debris would burn in about 45 days.

However, greater dirt from the test remains a problem almost three months later.

Roscosmos & Roman Fattakhov, who is responsible for checking debris in orbit around the earth, has previously stated that more than 100 debris can pose a risk to the ISS.

WHAT IS SPACE JUNK?

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There are an estimated 170 million pieces of so-called & # 39; space waste & # 39; – abandoned after missions that can be as large as spent rocket stages or as small as paint flakes – in orbit next to around US $ 700 billion (£ 555 billion) in space infrastructure.

But only 22,000 are tracked and with the fragments capable of traveling at speeds of more than 16,777 km / h (27,000 km / h), even small pieces of satellites can be seriously damaged or destroyed.

However, traditional gripping methods do not work in the room because suction cups do not work in a vacuum and temperatures are too cold for substances such as tape and glue.

Magnet-based grabs are useless because most particles in the orbit around the earth are not magnetic.

About 500,000 pieces of man-made debris (artist's # 39; s impression) are currently circling around our planet, consisting of discarded satellites, scraps of spaceship and spent rockets

Most proposed solutions, including rubble harpones, require or cause a powerful interaction with the rubble that could push these objects in unintended, unpredictable directions.

Scientists point to two events that have greatly aggravated the problem of space debris.

The first was in February 2009, when an Iridium telesom satellite and Kosmos 2251, a Russian military satellite, accidentally collided.

The second was in January 2007, when China tested an anti-satellite weapon on an old Fengyun weather satellite.

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Experts also pointed to two sites that have become worryingly messy.

One is a low orbit around the earth used by satnav satellites, the ISS, the manned missions in China and the Hubble telescope, among others.

The other is in a geostationary orbit and is used by communication, weather and surveillance satellites that must maintain a fixed position relative to the earth.

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