Home Australia Anti-police protesters get Sydney’s Mardi Gras parade off to a heated start as they march and chant “stop police attacks”, after officers were allowed to join the event.

Anti-police protesters get Sydney’s Mardi Gras parade off to a heated start as they march and chant “stop police attacks”, after officers were allowed to join the event.

by Elijah
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Sydney's Mardi Gras parade began with anti-police protests (pictured)

A large crowd of protesters marched through Hyde Park in Sydney ahead of Saturday’s carnival parade to protest the involvement of the New South Wales Police.

As they marched through the park toward the staging area for Saturday’s parade, the crowd chanted “stop police attacks on gays, women and black people.”

The organizers, Pride in Protest, also caused chaos in Darlinghurst, the heart of the city’s LGBTQI+ community, on Friday night, when around 300 people arrived for the same reason.

Police were not formally invited to march in this year’s parade following the arrest of a serving police officer, charged with the alleged murders of Jesse Baird and Luke Davies.

Davies was honored with a special float from Qantas, his former employer.

Sydney's Mardi Gras parade began with anti-police protests (pictured)

Sydney’s Mardi Gras parade began with anti-police protests (pictured)

Protesters were seen holding Aboriginal and Palestinian flags (pictured)

Protesters were seen holding Aboriginal and Palestinian flags (pictured)

Protesters were seen holding Aboriginal and Palestinian flags (pictured)

The protests (pictured) come as tensions remain high between law enforcement and the LGBTQI+ community following the deaths of Jesse Baird and Luke Davies.

The protests (pictured) come as tensions remain high between law enforcement and the LGBTQI+ community following the deaths of Jesse Baird and Luke Davies.

The protests (pictured) come as tensions remain high between law enforcement and the LGBTQI+ community following the deaths of Jesse Baird and Luke Davies.

Luke Davies was honored by his former employer Qanats on a float (pictured) in the parade.

Luke Davies was honored by his former employer Qanats on a float (pictured) in the parade.

Luke Davies was honored by his former employer Qanats on a float (pictured) in the parade.

Revelers showed up in some extravagant and extravagant costumes for the 46th annual Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

Revelers showed up in some extravagant and extravagant costumes for the 46th annual Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

Revelers showed up in some extravagant and extravagant costumes for the 46th annual Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.

However, officers on duty will be present at the parade, causing more anger in the group.

Pride in Protest organizers called those marching with the group to City Hall for a “raise your voice” event starting at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, and the march to the meeting area in Hyde Park took place shortly after. from 4:00 p.m.

Sharing on Instagram a photo of the police contingent assigned to the group’s pre-parade protest, organizers commented: “This could very well be their float.”

In the rally area, one protester brandished a large sign showing a blood-spattered gun flanked by a rainbow flag.

Police will allege in court that Beau Lamarre-Condon, who worked in the NSW Police Youth Command, used his service weapon to kill the couple, who had recently started dating.

Following a meeting with Police Commissioner Karen Webb, the officers were allowed to march again, although out of uniform, and are not allowed to carry weapons.

NSW Police officers (pictured left) were allowed to march in the parade after not previously being invited to the event.

NSW Police officers (pictured left) were allowed to march in the parade after not previously being invited to the event.

NSW Police officers (pictured left) were allowed to march in the parade after not previously being invited to the event.

Where can you watch Sydney’s Mardi Gras parade?

Saturday night’s carnival parade will begin at the corner of Hyde Park and Oxford Street at 7.30pm, wind its way along Oxford and Flinders Streets and conclude in Moore Park around 11pm.

Viewing from the street is free, but crowds are expected to be present along the parade route and throughout the city, with parties taking place throughout the CBD.

Anyone who wants to avoid the crowds can purchase tickets for the prime-time zones, some of which are still available on Saturday afternoon.

Those watching at home can tune in on ABC from 7:30 p.m. or on iview.

The Saturday night Mardi Gras parade will begin at the corner of Hyde Park and Oxford in Sydney on Saturday night at 7:30 pm (pictured, people in the Mardi Gras parade)

The Saturday night Mardi Gras parade will begin at the corner of Hyde Park and Oxford in Sydney on Saturday night at 7:30 pm (pictured, people in the Mardi Gras parade)

The Saturday night Mardi Gras parade will begin at the corner of Hyde Park and Oxford in Sydney on Saturday night at 7:30 pm (pictured, people in the Mardi Gras parade)

Thousands of attendees (pictured) will march at the event.

Thousands of attendees (pictured) will march at the event.

Thousands of attendees (pictured) will march at the event.

Large crowds expected to attend (pictured, Sydney Mardi Gras parade attendees)

The broadcast will be hosted by Australia’s most iconic drag star Courtney Act, non-binary musician G-Flip, actor Remy Hii and ABCQueer presenter Mon Schafter.

Parade will stop for a moment of silence

Organizers of the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras parade have revealed they will call off the parade to pay tribute to Mr Baird and Mr Davies, amid somber reflections on the couple’s lives days before the event.

Mr Baird, 26, and his boyfriend Mr Davies, 29, were allegedly murdered at Baird’s shared home in Paddington at around 9.30am on February 19.

Officer Beau Lamarre-Condon is accused of using his police-issued gun to shoot them, before dumping the bodies on a rural property.

Mardi Gras parade organizers have revealed they will stop the parade to pay tribute to Mr Baird and Mr Davies (pictured).

Mardi Gras parade organizers have revealed they will stop the parade to pay tribute to Mr Baird and Mr Davies (pictured).

Mardi Gras parade organizers have revealed they will stop the parade to pay tribute to Mr Baird and Mr Davies (pictured).

A moment of silence will be observed in memory of the young couple during this afternoon’s parade, which will begin at 6:00 p.m.

“We will take a moment to honor and remember Jesse Baird and Luke Davies, whose lives were tragically taken from us,” the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras said in a statement on Saturday.

‘This moment of remembrance serves as a powerful reminder of the ties that unite us and the memories of those we hold dear.

‘As the Dykes on Bikes approach Taylor Square for their second pass, the heart of our parade, they will pause.

“This serves as a signal for all attendees to join in a moment of silence.”

Davies will also be honored by his former employer, Qantas, on their float during the parade.

Hundreds of people gathered at Green Park in Darlinghurst on Friday night, an evening that would normally mark the start of a weekend of celebration and partying.

Instead, friends, family and members of the LGBTQIA+ community gathered in the evening to pay tribute to the lives of the young couple whose lives were so tragically cut short.

Event attendees (photos) will begin marching when the parade begins at 7:30 p.m. and the parade will conclude in Moore Park around 11 p.m.

Event attendees (photos) will begin marching when the parade begins at 7:30 p.m. and the parade will conclude in Moore Park around 11 p.m.

Event attendees (photos) will begin marching when the parade begins at 7:30 p.m. and the parade will conclude in Moore Park around 11 p.m.

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