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Another four-star general beats Donald Trump: John Allen warns of ‘descent to illiberalism’

Retired Marine General John Allen (pictured) denounced Donald Trump's actions amid nationwide turmoil, claiming his presidency could be the 'beginning of the end of the American experiment'

Retired Marine General John Allen (pictured) denounced Donald Trump’s actions amid nationwide turmoil, claiming his presidency could be the ‘beginning of the end of the American experiment’

A retired four-star general from Marine Corp lashed out at Donald Trump on Wednesday, claiming that his actions amid violent nationwide riots about George Floyd’s death are “ shameful. ”

John Allen, president of the Brookings Institute – often referred to as a liberal-centrist think tank – insisted that Trump’s presidency could be the “ beginning of the end of American democracy. ”

“The fall of the United States into illiberalism may have started on June 1, 2020,” Allen wrote in an opinion published on ForeginPolicy.com on Wednesday. Remember the date. It may well be the beginning of the end of the American experiment. ‘

The retired general refers to a Monday outing when President Trump stepped outside the White House, walked through Lafayette Park, which had been free of protesters several minutes earlier through the use of tear gas and rubber bullets, and arrived at St. John’s Episcopal Church for a photo – up with his bible.

The stunt came amid days of peaceful and violent protests across the country about the death of George Floyd at the hands of a white agent in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Memorial Day.

Allen’s comments to Trump followed former President Defense Secretary James Mattis’ first-ever overt criticism of his former boss, which was published in an opinion piece in The Atlantic Ocean on Wednesday.

Donald Trump is the first president in my life who doesn’t try to unite the American people – he doesn’t even pretend to try. Instead, he’s trying to divide us, “Mattis said to the president in a rare joke.

Mattis also compared the president to Nazis.

Allen, in his opinion, opposed the President’s mobilization of the United States military to repel and repress rioters and condemned Trump’s comparison of the violent protesters who destroy cities with “domestic terrorists.”

But the former commander of the international NATO security service and the US armed forces in Afghanistan was usually disappointed with the use of force to pave the way for a presidential photo op.

‘[T]the president declared himself “ally of peaceful protesters”. But at the same time, just a few hundred yards away over Lafayette Park, the fully equipped riot police and troops violently and without provocation put the peaceful protesters there, basked and beat many of them, using a bang, riot. controls and pepper spray everywhere, ”Allen wrote.

He specifically called Trump's June 1 walk from the White House, through Lafayette Park to St. John's Episcopal Church for a photo op with his Bible

He specifically called Trump's June 1 walk from the White House, through Lafayette Park to St. John's Episcopal Church for a photo op with his Bible

He specifically called Trump’s June 1 walk from the White House, through Lafayette Park to St. John’s Episcopal Church for a photo op with his Bible

‘[T]the president declared himself “ally of peaceful protesters”. But at that time, just a few hundred yards away over Lafayette Park, fully equipped riot police and troops violently and without provocation put the peaceful protesters there, manipulating and beating many of them, using a bang, riot. controls and pepper spray everywhere, ”Allen wrote

The four-star general's comments came the same day that former Secretary of Defense James Mattis broke his silence about Trump's leadership, revealing that he is 'angry and dismayed' at his handling of the George Floyd protests

The four-star general's comments came the same day that former Secretary of Defense James Mattis broke his silence about Trump's leadership, revealing that he is 'angry and dismayed' at his handling of the George Floyd protests

The four-star general’s comments came the same day that former Secretary of Defense James Mattis broke his silence about Trump’s leadership, revealing that he is ‘angry and dismayed’ at his handling of the George Floyd protests

On Monday, law enforcement forced peaceful protesters out of the park prior to Trump’s brief visit to the church across Pennsylvania Avenue from the North Lawn of the White House.

Trump pushed back against Mattis’s comments on Wednesday, claiming he is the “ most overrated general in the world ” after the naval veteran disapproved of the president’s leadership in light of the nationwide protests.

Mattis first publicly spoke out since his bitter December 2018 exit from the White House accusing Trump of being a “mockery of the constitution” in a fiery statement shared Wednesday.

While Mattis has hinted at criticism of his former boss in the past, he’s never been more excited about his disappointment with the president.

Trump quickly fired back.

“Probably Barack Obama and I have in common that we both had the honor of firing Jim Mattis, the most overrated general in the world. I asked for his resignation letter and felt great about it, ” Trump tweeted Wednesday evening.

His nickname was ‘Chaos,’ which I didn’t like, and turned into ‘Mad Dog,’ Trump added.

While Trump claimed he had fired Mattis, the general resigned after disagreeing with Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from Syria.

Donald Trump quickly fired back at his former Secretary of Defense, claiming he is 'the most overrated general in the world' after the official released a brooding opinion on Wednesday denouncing the president's leadership

Donald Trump quickly fired back at his former Secretary of Defense, claiming he is 'the most overrated general in the world' after the official released a brooding opinion on Wednesday denouncing the president's leadership

Donald Trump quickly fired back at his former Secretary of Defense, claiming he is ‘the most overrated general in the world’ after the official released a brooding opinion on Wednesday denouncing the president’s leadership

His military call sign was ‘Chaos’ which stands for ‘Colonel Has Another Outstanding Suggestion’. He was nicknamed “Mad Dog,” which Mattis reportedly dislikes years before Trump took office.

His primary strength was not military, but rather personal public relations. I gave him a new life, things to do and battles to win, but he rarely “brought home the bacon.” I didn’t like his ‘leadership style’ or much else about him, and many others agree. Glad he’s gone! Trump added.

Mattis’ opinion was the first time he publicly disapproved of the President and condemned the flexing of military power against George Floyd’s protests, which he calls a legitimate response to the demand for equal justice.

Donald Trump is the first president in my life who doesn’t try to unite the American people – he doesn’t even pretend to try. He’s trying to divide us instead, “said Mattis.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany defended the president and criticized Mattis as ineffective.

The article by “former secretary Mattis” is little more than a self-promotion stunt to appease the DC elite. President Donald Trump is the president of law and order who restored peace to the streets of our country. Mattis ‘little words pale in comparison to POTUS’ powerful action. ‘

In his statement, Mattis, a four-star Marine general, compared Trump’s tactic to “divide” the nation with that of the Nazis.

“Instructions given to our troops by the military departments before the Normandy invasion reminded the soldiers that” the Nazi slogan to destroy us … was “divide and rule,” he writes. “Our American answer is ‘In Union there is Strength’. We must call on that unity to overcome this crisis – convinced that we are better than our politics. ‘

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany condemned Mattis’s article calling it “a self-promotional stunt to appease the DC elite”

60 minutes Correspondent John Dickerson said he wrote a profile on Mattis 11 years ago, noting that Mattis had 'the nickname' Mad Dog 'years before Trump was in office, and it was a nickname he didn't like

60 minutes Correspondent John Dickerson said he wrote a profile on Mattis 11 years ago, noting that Mattis had 'the nickname' Mad Dog 'years before Trump was in office, and it was a nickname he didn't like

60 minutes Correspondent John Dickerson said he wrote a profile on Mattis 11 years ago, noting that Mattis had ‘the nickname’ Mad Dog ‘years before Trump was in office, and it was a nickname he didn’t like

His statement about Trump attempting to divide the nation follows immediately.

“We are witnessing the consequences of three years of this conscious effort. We are witnessing the consequences of three years without mature leadership. We can unite without him, using the strengths inherent in our civil society, ”he continues.

He emphatically takes Trump’s photo on Monday, where the President waved a Bible to St. John’s Church after protesters were released from the area. He writes that he is “angry and appalled” by unfolding events.

“We know we’re better than the executive abuse we’ve seen in Lafayette Square. We must reject and hold responsible those who would mock our Constitution. At the same time, we need to remember Lincoln’s “better angels” and listen to them as we work to unite, “Mattis wrote.

He called for unity and calm. “This will not be easy, as the past few days have shown, but we owe it to our fellow citizens; to previous generations who bled to defend our promise; and to our children. ‘

His sizzling article comes as other former military officials, including former chief of the chief of staff, Admiral Mike Mullen, blamed Trump for “politicizing” the military.

Mattis also wholeheartedly supports those who are marching for changes to the U.S. police after the death of George Floyd, who is black, at the hands of a white police officer – even mentioning a “small number of offenders” who have suffered material damage, causing a strip downtown DC buildings with shattered windows.

READ THE FULL CONDEMNATION OF DONALD TRUMP BY MARINE GENERAL JIM MATTIS

I’ve watched this week’s burgeoning events, angry and appalled. The words “Equal Justice Under Law” are carved into the pediment of the United States Supreme Court. This is exactly what protesters rightly demand. It is a beneficial and unifying question – which we should all be able to find out. We should not be distracted by a small number of offenders. The protests are defined by tens of thousands of conscientious people who insist that we live our values ​​- our values ​​as people and our values ​​as a nation.

When I joined the military about 50 years ago, I swore an oath to support and defend the constitution. Never had I dreamed that troops taking the same oath, under any circumstance, would be ordered to violate the constitutional rights of their fellow citizens – much less to take a bizarre photo for the chosen commander in chief, with military leadership next to it.

We must reject any thought of our cities as a “battle space” to “dominate” our uniformed army. At home, we are only allowed to use our army when the state governors ask for it, in very rare cases. As we militarized our response, as we have seen in Washington, D.C., there is a conflict – a false one – between military and civil society. It affects the moral ground that creates a familiar bond between men and women in uniform and the society they have sworn to protect and of which they themselves are a part. Maintaining public order rests with the marital status and local leaders who best understand and account for their communities.

James Madison wrote in Federalist 14 that “America united with a handful of troops, or without a single soldier, exhibits a more forbidding attitude toward foreign ambitions than America united with 100,000 veterans ready for battle.” We don’t have to militarize our response to protests. We must unite around a common goal. And it starts with ensuring that we are all equal before the law.

Instructions given to our troops by the military departments before the Normandy invasion reminded the soldiers that “The Nazi slogan to destroy us … was” Divide and rule. ” Our American answer is “In Union there is Strength”. We must call on that unity to overcome this crisis – the confidence that we are better than our politics.

Donald Trump is the first president in my life who doesn’t try to unite the American people – he doesn’t even pretend to try. Instead, he tries to divide us. We are witnessing the consequences of three years of this deliberate effort. We are witnessing the consequences of three years without mature leadership. We can unite without him, using the strengths inherent in our civil society. This will not be easy, as has been shown in recent days, but we owe it to our fellow citizens; to previous generations who bled to defend our promise; and to our children.

We can weather this difficult time stronger and with a renewed sense of purpose and respect for each other. The pandemic has shown us that not only our troops are willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for the safety of the community. Americans in hospitals, supermarkets, post offices and elsewhere have risked their lives to serve their fellow citizens and their country. We know that we are better than the abuse of the executive that we have seen in Lafayette Square. We must reject and hold responsible those who would mock our Constitution. At the same time, we must remember and listen to Lincoln’s “better angels” as we work to unite.

Only by taking a new path – which basically means returning to the original path of our fundamentals – will we be a country admired and respected at home and abroad.

“It’s a beneficial and unifying question – one that we should all be able to answer. We should not be distracted by a small number of offenders. The protests are defined by tens of thousands of conscientious people who insist that we live our values ​​- our values ​​as people and our values ​​as a nation, ”Mattis writes.

He also shoots a statement by Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, whose job is already in danger, for his statement calling for governors to “dominate the battlefield” in American cities.

“We should reject any thought of our cities as a ‘battle space’ that should ‘dominate’ our uniformed army. At home, we are only allowed to use our army when the governors of the state ask for it, in very rare cases. As we militarized our response, as we saw in Washington, D.C., there is a conflict – a false conflict – between military and civil society, “he writes.

“It affects the moral ground that creates a trusted bond between men and women in uniform and the society they have vowed to protect and are a part of.”

He also shot the “bizarre photo” Trump ordered when federal police, backed by the National Guard, cleared out peaceful protesters in Lafayette Park.

“When I joined the military some fifty years ago, I swore an oath to support and defend the constitution,” writes Mattis. “I had never dreamed that troops taking the same oath would be ordered under all circumstances to violate the constitutional rights of their fellow citizens, let alone take a bizarre photo for the chosen commander-in-chief with military leadership next to it. ‘

Mattis indicated on his resignation that he felt obliged to keep comments to himself. “There is a time when I owe my silence. It is not eternal. It won’t be forever, “he said at the time.

While in office, Mattis stood out among other cabinet officials for not praising the president with excessive praise at public events.

Behind the scenes, there were skirmishes, as his former spokesman Guy Snodgrass told in his story.

Mattis even told assistants that he preferred to “take a sour” rather than Trump throwing a $ 50 million “Victory Parade” in the nation’s capital.

Trump tapped Mattis along with other high-profile military officers to man his administration. He was nicknamed ‘Warrior Monk’ and quoted Homer and Sun Tzu.

Esper fought for his job on Wednesday, even as authorities try to conquer the streets of the country – as he contradicted President Donald Trump’s use of a special military authority, and the military announced a sudden reversal of a plan to begin it. withdraw from active service troops from around the world Washington.

The day was marked by a sudden turnaround and contradictory explanation of a photo operation involving both Esper and the President on Monday, without a clear plan on how regular forces, the National Guard, the local police and external forces work together to maintain order .

About 200 members of the 82nd Army Airborne Division are said to have left the DC area on Wednesday – only to suddenly reverse the order after Esper visited the White House after a morning press conference where he attempted to distance himself from the infamous photo – on Monday in the Sint-Janskerk.

The change came after Esper’s meeting in the White House and internal discussions in the Pentagon, Army Secretary Ryan McCarthy told the Associated Press in an on-record statement.

It took hours after a 10 o’clock order to take down some of the 1,600 military personnel, including infantry members deployed outside Washington, DC, and after the White House declined to say Trump trusted Esper, who succeeded “acting” secretaries and who himself played such a role after the departure of General James Mattis.

Esper told reporters on Wednesday that he was against the enactment of the 1807 Insurrection Act to send the U.S. military to impose control of cities – even when the president spoke loudly on Twitter and an infantry battalion to Washington, D.C.

It was a statement that stunned the White House at a time when President Trump was wielding maximum authority – and could endanger Esper’s job.

Esper made the public statement of opposition to the idea after the White House publicly circulated it on Monday – and after the government took up heat for using tear gas and rubber bullets to remove protesters from Lafayette Park just before Esper joined President Donald Trump added on a photo op.

The decision to maintain the force that had flown into the region comes even if the protests were quieter at night on Tuesday than the night of the incident in Lafayette Park.

It was then revealed that the governors of Maryland and Virginia had refused to send their national groups to the country’s capital, which has a protracted battle over home government with the federal authorities.

Trump loyalist Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said he would send 500 guard troops.

Esper also tried to distance himself from the photo surgery itself, saying that although he knew he was going to church, he thought he would visit troops. He eventually posed with Trump and officials, including Attorney General Bill Barr, who had ordered the action Monday morning, according to the White House, but found it hadn’t happened hours later.

“What I wasn’t aware of was exactly where we went when we got to church and what the plans were when we got there,” said Esper. He also attempted to take back a comment that called American cities “battle space.” “In retrospect, I would use different terms,” ​​he said of his conference call with Trump and governors, “he said.

Defense officials said several hours after he spoke at the Pentagon that some of the active duty troops who had flown into the Washington region to deal with civil unrest were being sent home.

About 200 members of the 82nd Airborne would leave the region on Wednesday, officials told the Associated Press. They belong to a group of 1,600 infantry and military police who are being held at the grassroots base in Maryland and Virginia outside Washington after President Trump repeatedly called for the use of military force to regain control of the streets across the country.

Esper made his public comments while under enormous political pressure. “I say this not only as defense minister, but also as a former soldier and former member of the National Guard,” Esper told reporters at a Pentagon news conference as he made his point of view.

“The ability to use active military forces in a law enforcement role should only be used as a last resort and only in the most urgent and nasty situations,” he said.

“We are not in any of those situations now. I don’t support invoking the Insurrection Act, ”he added.

The Esper public uprising in the White House immediately raised questions about how long he can survive.

“Right now Secretary Esper is still Secretary Esper, and if the President loses confidence, we will all find out in the future,” said White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany when asked whether Trump still trusts him. has.

McEnany was asked whether Esper had expressed his opinion of the resurrection law to the President before his public statement, and whether Trump had confidence in him.

“Right now Secretary Esper is still Secretary Esper,” said White House press secretary Keyleigh McEnany.

“Not that I know his opinion,” she replied. “And I wouldn’t go into the private conversations here at the White House. And as to whether the President is confident, I would say that if he loses confidence in Secretary Esper, I am sure you will be the first to know, “she said.

McEnany referred to the Insurrection Act – which Esper publicly opposed – as a “tool” for the president to use.

“The president has sole power to appeal to the Resurrection Act. It is definitely a tool in his power. This president has only one goal: to protect the streets of America. We cannot have burning churches, “she said, referring to the damage to St. John’s on Sunday evening.

“The Insurrection Act is a tool available,” she said.

Esper also defended the chief of joint chiefs of staff, army general Mark Milley, for walking around the White House in combat uniform, saying it was “ appropriate, ” after a series of retired generals expressed anger at the behavior of both men and warned they were politicizing army.

Esper, a former member of the DC National Guard, spoke hours after the Pentagon announced the roster of active forces to Washington, DC, but shortly after he spoke, some of those federal troops were sent home amid signs of mounting concerns within the higher military ranks in their involvement with the capital.

In total, 1,600 troops were moved to bases in the area as a “prudent planning measure in response to continued support for civilian authorities’ operations,” the Pentagon said.

The Department of Defense moved several army units on active duty to the National Capitol Region if the Secretary of Defense authorized the movement of an infantry battalion, Task Force 504, assigned to the Army’s Immediate Response Force at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, said a statement.

“I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act,” said Defense Secretary Mark Esper, who said that active military forces should only be used for law enforcement in the home country as a “last resort”

His public statement comes despite a New York Times report that Esper preferred using the law, as did Vice President Mike Pence. The newspaper reported that chairman of joint chiefs Mark Milley was against the idea, thinking he had enough guard troops to provide support. Attorney General Bill Barr, who reportedly had given permission to clear up the park, preferred to postpone states’ rights in this area, the newspaper reported.

Esper made the statement at a news conference where he also claimed he had no idea where he was going when Trump led members of his government for a walk to St. John’s Episcopal Church for a controversial photo shoot.

He also insisted that he “had no idea” that violence would be used to clean up peaceful protesters prior to the staged journey.

The performance may not have gone well in the White House. President Trump was “not happy” with it, CNN reported – after Esper distanced himself from the White House in both the photo op and the Insurrection Act.

I was just inspecting the bunker under the White House when I went there ‘two and a half’ or three times during protests, Donald Trump claims

President Donald Trump said that during the protests in Washington, D.C., he went to the White House bunker to inspect it, not because of a potential threat.

He denied a report that he had been admitted to secure asylum by security agents on Friday evening for concerns about his security.

“I’m going down, I’ve gone down two or three times – all for inspection – and you’re going there, you might ever need it,” he said on Brian Kilmeade’s FOX News Radio show on Wednesday. “I went downstairs. I looked at it. It was not a problem during the day. ‘

The president reportedly spent an hour there on Friday evening when hundreds of protesters gathered outside the White House, some of whom threw stones and pulled police barriers.

Trump is said to be enraged at the image of himself in the underground firing hole, which was designed for use in emergency situations such as a terrorist attack. His crackdown on protesters and the march to St. John’s Church opposite the White House on Monday – where police used gas and rubber bullets to remove peaceful protesters from the area to make way for the President – was in part in response to reports the bunker.

He described his time in the underground chamber as “more for an inspection.”

“I was only there for a short, short period of time,” he told Kilmeade on Wednesday morning in a 30-minute interview. ‘Een hele groep mensen ging mee als inspectiefactor.’

‘Ze zeiden dat het een goed moment zou zijn om naar beneden te gaan en een kijkje te nemen, want misschien heb je het ooit nodig,’ merkte hij op. ‘Ik ben naar beneden geweest – dat zou nummer twee zijn, dus tweeënhalf, omdat ik verschillende dingen heb gedaan, maar tweeënhalf.’

‘Maar ik keek dat ik heel erg kort was, een heel erg korte tijd, ik kan je niet vertellen wie met me meeging, maar een hele groep mensen ging met me mee’, voegde Trump eraan toe.

– Door Emily Goodin, Senior Amerikaanse politieke verslaggever voor Dailymail.com

Zelfs toen Esper waarschuwde tegen het uitoefenen van het gezag om thuis militaire troepen te gebruiken, bleef Trump zijn ‘wet en orde’-houding op Twitter uitzenden. Het Noordelijk Commando van het Pentagon stuurde ook troepen van het 16e hoofdkwartier van de Brigade van de Militaire Politie vanuit Fort Bragg en het 91ste Bataljon van de Militaire Politie vanuit Fort Drum, New York.

Esper’s botte verzet tegen het gebruik van de opstandingswet kwam te midden van enkele tekenen van nieuw succes door de politie om orde op zaken te stellen. De gebeurtenissen op straat waren rustiger in New York City op de tweede avond van een uitgaansverbod dat werd opgelegd na plundering in Manhattan.

Gisteravond hebben we een stap voorwaarts gezet om uit deze moeilijke periode die we de afgelopen dagen hebben gehad te verhuizen en naar een betere tijd te gaan ‘, zei burgemeester Bill de Blasio.

De NYPD blokkeerde 5.000 demonstranten om Manhattan binnen te komen door ze na een impasse op de Manhattan Bridge te houden, waardoor 280 arrestaties plaatsvonden.

Trump beweerde dinsdag dat de stad ‘helemaal uit de hand liep’. Woensdag zei hij dat de Nationale Garde ‘klaar’ was.

Er was ook meer rust in Washington, D.C., waar wetshandhavers een nieuw veiligheidshek installeerden na het opruimen van Lafayette Square. Duizenden marcheerden naar het Witte Huis en het Amerikaanse Capitool, maar er was minder spanning en er was geen herhaling van een uitbarsting van vandalisme die zondagavond plaatsvond.

Op een grote bijeenkomst van vreedzame demonstranten was een man te zien die een bord van 16th Street bij het Witte Huis had neergehaald, op de plek waar de politie maandag een andere partij vreedzame demonstranten verplaatste.

Trump eiste woensdag dat de politie ‘taai’ wordt na een zesde nacht van nationale protesten – maar privé steunt de president zijn plan om federale troepen te sturen om relschoppers te onderdrukken.

Terwijl president Trump woensdagochtend een tirade van meer dan 35 tweet lanceerde, gedeeltelijk met de bewering dat de gewelddadige demonstranten ‘binnenlandse terroristen’ zijn, liet hij ook zijn idee varen om het leger te sturen nadat functionarissen beweerden dat lokale regeringen de leiding zouden nemen, Associated Press gemeld.

Trump vertelde leden van zijn kabinet de afgelopen week dat hij het leger naar Amerikaanse steden wil sturen – een voorstel dat leidde tot een verhitte schreeuwwedstrijd tussen degenen die het idee steunen en de tegenstanders.

Vice-president Mike Pence en minister van Defensie Mark Esper steunden het idee en beweerden dat het de federale regering een snellere controle over de situatie zou geven dan wanneer het de Nationale Garde zou overnemen en activeren.

Procureur-generaal Bill Barr en Joint Chiefs of Staff General Mark Milley waarschuwden echter voor het plan.

Barr was concerned with infringing on states’ rights if the military were deployed to different cities across the country facing riots and Gen. Milley assured the president he had enough force in D.C. to secure the city.

He also did not want to put active-duty military in such a domestic role.

The divide over the plan grew tentious during the Monday morning discussion as administration officials began raising their voices at one another, according to The New York Times.

Demonstrators leave Manhattan Bridge after being arrested by police last night during a 8:00 pm curfew that was ignored by thousands but followed by less rampant destruction than in New York City in previous days

Demonstrators leave Manhattan Bridge after being arrested by police last night during a 8:00 pm curfew that was ignored by thousands but followed by less rampant destruction than in New York City in previous days

Demonstrators leave Manhattan Bridge after being arrested by police last night during a 8:00 pm curfew that was ignored by thousands but followed by less rampant destruction than in New York City in previous days

The NYPD stopped 5,000 protesters from entering Manhattan by blocking them on the Manhattan Bridge on Tuesday evening. The protesters withdrew after 2 hours

The NYPD stopped 5,000 protesters from entering Manhattan by blocking them on the Manhattan Bridge on Tuesday evening. The protesters withdrew after 2 hours

The NYPD stopped 5,000 protesters from entering Manhattan by blocking them on the Manhattan Bridge on Tuesday evening. The protesters withdrew after 2 hours

5,000 protesters were stopped from entering Manhattan after walking across the Manhattan Bridge on Tuesday night

5,000 protesters were stopped from entering Manhattan after walking across the Manhattan Bridge on Tuesday night

5,000 protesters were stopped from entering Manhattan after walking across the Manhattan Bridge on Tuesday night

New report: Donald Trump has privately backed down on his demand that active duty military be deployed to quell riots after administration officials raised their voices in debating the plan

New report: Donald Trump has privately backed down on his demand that active duty military be deployed to quell riots after administration officials raised their voices in debating the plan

New report: Donald Trump has privately backed down on his demand that active duty military be deployed to quell riots after administration officials raised their voices in debating the plan

The decision to abandon the plan came Monday as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters in front of St. John's Episcopal to disperse the crowd for the president's photo-op in front of the church, which was set on fire in Sunday riots outside the White House

The decision to abandon the plan came Monday as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters in front of St. John's Episcopal to disperse the crowd for the president's photo-op in front of the church, which was set on fire in Sunday riots outside the White House

The decision to abandon the plan came Monday as police fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters in front of St. John’s Episcopal to disperse the crowd for the president’s photo-op in front of the church, which was set on fire in Sunday riots outside the White House

Even though he privately abandoned the plan to show even a greater image of force in the nation's capital, Trump still told police Wednesday to 'get tough' as riots continued in cities across the country in a sixth night of violent protests in the wake of George Floyd's death

Even though he privately abandoned the plan to show even a greater image of force in the nation's capital, Trump still told police Wednesday to 'get tough' as riots continued in cities across the country in a sixth night of violent protests in the wake of George Floyd's death

Even though he privately abandoned the plan to show even a greater image of force in the nation’s capital, Trump still told police Wednesday to ‘get tough’ as riots continued in cities across the country in a sixth night of violent protests in the wake of George Floyd’s death

Trump finally decided to break with his original plan and instead opted for a stunt where law enforcement dispersed protesters with tear gas and rubber bullets from Lafayette Park, across from the North Lawn of the White House.

After protesters were cleared, the president walked across the park to St. John’s Episcapol church, which was set on fire in riots Sunday night, for a photo-op with his bible and members of his cabinet.

Administration officials privately acknowledged Monday’s events did not do the administration any justice.

Even some Republican lawmakers who are typically in sync with the president said Trump went too far in using force to clear the way for his less than five-minute visit to the church.

‘There is no right to riot, no right to destroy others’ property, and no right to throw rocks at police,’ Nebraska Republican Senator Ben Sasse said. ‘But there is a fundamental — a constitutional — right to protest, and I’m against clearing out a peaceful protest for a photo op that treats the Word of God as a political prop.’

On Tuesday, a senior White House official said the president wanted to make the aggressive action an example for the rest of the country.

Despite his decision not to deploy the military, Trump continued to insist that ‘The National Guard is ready!’ on Twitter Wednesday.

He has continuously urged governors to activate the National Guard in their states so cities destroyed by rioters could be policed by the Army reservist unit.

Trump shared images of his Twitter of Fifth Avenue in New York City boarding up all of its high-end businesses after several were looted and destroyed in riots in the past week as he again promoted activating the National Guard.

‘LAW & ORDER!’ he urged in another tweet .

President Trump claimed Wednesday that protesters are acting as ‘domestic terrorists’ and told law enforcement to ‘get tough’ on rioters.

‘CNN says there are some fine people marching with the looters and domestic terrorists,’ Trump shared in a retweet from comic strip creator and satire author Scott Adams.

He also urged in another tweet: ‘Get tough police!’ after law enforcement in Milwaukee, Wisconsin revealed Tuesday night that violent protesters threw molotov cocktails at their force.

‘Molotov cocktails are lethal force, and from their very origins, a ‘weapon of war’ (thanks Finland!),’ Buck Sexton, who formerly worked for the CIA and NYPD Intelligence Division, wrote on Twitter – and the president shared to his profile.

‘If you throw a Molotov cocktail at police, you should spend a very long time in prison,’ Sexton, who now hosts a podcast, continued.

The Twitter tirade from Trump comes after a sixth night of violent protests broke out across the country in the wake of George Floyd’s death – and the president is seeking to make the use of force in Washington, D.C an example for other cities experiencing mayhem.

Demonstrators continued to flood the nation's capital – even past the 7:00 p.m. city-wide curfew – but not nearly as much destruction was done Wednesday night as night's prior

Demonstrators continued to flood the nation's capital – even past the 7:00 p.m. city-wide curfew – but not nearly as much destruction was done Wednesday night as night's prior

Demonstrators continued to flood the nation’s capital – even past the 7:00 p.m. city-wide curfew – but not nearly as much destruction was done Wednesday night as night’s prior

The president sent out a more than 35-tweet tirade where he asserted the 'National Guard is ready!' as stores had to prepare for more nights of riots, looting and arson by boarding up their windows

The president sent out a more than 35-tweet tirade where he asserted the 'National Guard is ready!' as stores had to prepare for more nights of riots, looting and arson by boarding up their windows

The president sent out a more than 35-tweet tirade where he asserted the ‘National Guard is ready!’ as stores had to prepare for more nights of riots, looting and arson by boarding up their windows

Officials claim the president wanted to make Washington, D.C. an example of the 'show of force' other cities should implement to quell the violence

Officials claim the president wanted to make Washington, D.C. an example of the 'show of force' other cities should implement to quell the violence

Officials claim the president wanted to make Washington, D.C. an example of the ‘show of force’ other cities should implement to quell the violence

On Tuesday evening, 700 soldiers dressed in riot gear and armed with bayonets arrived at military bases near Washington, and another 1,400 were prepared  to mobilize

On Tuesday evening, 700 soldiers dressed in riot gear and armed with bayonets arrived at military bases near Washington, and another 1,400 were prepared  to mobilize

On Tuesday evening, 700 soldiers dressed in riot gear and armed with bayonets arrived at military bases near Washington, and another 1,400 were prepared  to mobilize

Defense officials revealed that Trump, before abandoning the plan, considered using ‘tanks’ or other armored military vehicles to help restore order, and threatened to deploy active duty military across the country to quell the unrest.

The revelation of a more ‘dominating’ approach to taking control of the streets of D.C. comes as 700 soldiers dressed in riot gear and armed with bayonets arrived at two military bases near Washington on Tuesday evening.

Another 1,400 were also brought in and prepared to mobilize as the nation’s capital braced for another night of chaos.

Hundreds of members of the Army’s 82nd Airborne Division were called earlier after Trump promised a more aggressive approach on the violence and riots unfolding across the country.

Defense officials told the Associated Press that the U.S. Military and National Guard were operating under the mission name ‘Operation Themis’ – named after the titaness of divine law and order.

Trump asserted Monday evening in a Rose Garden address to the nation that he is America’s ‘law and order president.’

As Trump made the remarks on Monday, law enforcement officials were pushing out hundreds of protesters from Washington’s Lafayette Park, ahead of the district’s 7:00 p.m. curfew.

A senior White House official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, revealed on Tuesday that Trump hoped to make the aggressive action in Washington an example for the rest of the country.

On Monday night, military helicopters also hovered over demonstrators in a tactic to disperse the crowds.

Two Pentagon officials also told AP that the president had ordered military aircraft to fly above the capital as a ‘show of force’ against violent protesters.

President Donald J. Trump returns after posing with a bible outside St. John's Episcopal Church after delivering remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington

President Donald J. Trump returns after posing with a bible outside St. John's Episcopal Church after delivering remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington

President Donald J. Trump returns after posing with a bible outside St. John’s Episcopal Church after delivering remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington

Many of the protesters stood firm as the helicopters made several passes overhead

Many of the protesters stood firm as the helicopters made several passes overhead

Many of the protesters stood firm as the helicopters made several passes overhead

Videos posted to Twitter showed demonstrators quaking beneath deafening gusts

Videos posted to Twitter showed demonstrators quaking beneath deafening gusts

Videos posted to Twitter showed demonstrators quaking beneath deafening gusts

Videos posted to Twitter showed demonstrators quaking beneath deafening gusts

Videos posted to Twitter showed demonstrators quaking beneath deafening gusts

They did not say how many or what type of aircraft had been mobilized.

Videos and photographs posted on social media showed helicopters flying low over buildings and hovering just above groups who were on the street despite a district-wide curfew.

Law enforcement paired the tactic with heavy use of tear gas, pellets and chemical spray as protesters marched toward the White House.

Trump’s tactics were decried on Tuesday by some fellow Republicans as well as his presumptive Democratic opponent Joe Biden.

Show-of-force missions are designed to intimidate and, in combat zones, warn opposing forces of potential military action if provoked.

Three senior defense officials also told The Daily Beast that the idea of deploying military forces was being pushed by the White House, not the Pentagon.

The sources revealed Trump consulted with aides about using military vehicles or ‘the kind of hardware’ used by the armed forces, to help bring the chaos under control.

Hundreds of army soldiers armed with bayonets arrived  at two military bases near Washington on Tuesday evening (pictured: 82nd Airborne Division soldier holding a bayonet in 2015)

Hundreds of army soldiers armed with bayonets arrived  at two military bases near Washington on Tuesday evening (pictured: 82nd Airborne Division soldier holding a bayonet in 2015)

Hundreds of army soldiers armed with bayonets arrived  at two military bases near Washington on Tuesday evening (pictured: 82nd Airborne Division soldier holding a bayonet in 2015)

One official said Trump did not specifically order ‘tanks’ to patrol the streets, but said he mentioned it in discussions because ‘I think that is just one of the military words he knows’.

It comes as 700 soldiers dressed in riot gear and armed with bayonets arrived at two military bases near Washington on Tuesday evening, while another 1,400 are preparing to mobilize, as the nation’s capital braces for another night of chaos.

Hundreds of members of the Army’s 82nd Airborne Division were called earlier after Trump promised a more aggressive approach on the violence and riots unfolding across the country.

Defense officials told AP the US military and National Guard were operating under the mission name ‘Operation Themis’ – named after the titaness of divine law and order.

Moments after the historic Lafayette Park was cleared of protesters on Monday, Trump walked across to pose with a Bible in front of a church damaged by fire during protests the previous evening.

He hoped his personal walk to the church would send a message about how dominant force could restore law and order, sources said.

Protesters hold their hands up and try to steady themselves as a military helicopter flies low pushing a strong vertical down wash of air (rotor wash) onto the crowd

Protesters hold their hands up and try to steady themselves as a military helicopter flies low pushing a strong vertical down wash of air (rotor wash) onto the crowd

Protesters hold their hands up and try to steady themselves as a military helicopter flies low pushing a strong vertical down wash of air (rotor wash) onto the crowd

‘D.C. had no problems last night. Many arrests. Great job done by all. Overwhelming force. Domination,’ Trump tweeted Tuesday, after a night in which heavily armed military forces and federal officers swarmed the city.

Trump added: ‘(thank you President Trump!).’

In an evening address in the Rose Garden on Monday, Trump called on governors to ramp up the National Guard presence in their states to tamp down the protests.

If they didn’t abide by those orders, Trump said, he would dispatch the military to their states – a step rarely taken in modern American history.

‘SILENT MAJORITY!’ Trump tweeted Tuesday, embracing a phrase popularized by President Richard Nixon decades ago, in claiming broad support for his actions. Trump also emphasized the political importance of the moment to his supporters on Twitter and declared that ‘My Admin has done more for the Black Community than any President since Abraham Lincoln.’

The District of Columbia’s federal status gives the president outsized authority to act, allowing him to direct the deployment of the National Guard.

He authorized Attorney General William Barr to oversee a surge in the deployment of federal law enforcement officers, including the FBI’s Hostage Rescue Team and agents from the Drug Enforcement Agency.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, sought to distance themselves from Monday night’s events after former military officials criticized their appearance with the president.

Senior defense officials told reporters the two were not aware that the Park Police and law enforcement had made a decision to clear the square or that Trump intended to visit the church.

They had been in Washington to coordinate with federal law enforcement officials but were diverted to the White House to brief Trump on military preparations, the officials said.

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