Annie Barnett diagnosed with FIVE brain aneurysms after going to bed with a headache in Queensland

Pictured: Annie Barnett, 21″

A young woman who found out she had five aneurysms after going to bed with a headache miraculously survived after two suddenly exploded in her brain — and she’s terrified her entire family could have the same condition.

Annie Barnett felt tired when she finished her shift at the Woolworths deli near her home in Burpengary, north of Brisbane, on Oct. 9.

The 21-year-old, who also runs a social media marketing company, went to bed around 8pm complaining of a headache but woke up about three hours later with “the worst pain I’ve ever felt,” she told Daily Mail Australia .

Paramedics were called when her younger brother Bernie, 19, found her crying, moaning, and crashing into walls as she tried to stagger down the hall.

After a series of scans, her family received the heartbreaking news that the otherwise healthy young woman had five bulging blood vessels in her brain — known as aneurysms.

According to John Hopkins Medicine, less than two percent of the population has brain aneurysms, and only 20 percent of those patients have more than one.

Annie Barnett (pictured) went to bed in October with a headache and woke up in excruciating pain

Annie Barnett (pictured) went to bed in October with a headache and woke up in excruciating pain

The young woman was one semester away from graduating from college when she nearly died

The young woman was one semester away from graduating from college when she nearly died

Mrs. Barnett was terrified because one of her five aneurysms burst, seeping blood into her brain.

Doctors tried unsuccessfully to stop the bleeding through a vein in her leg, but ended removing part of her skull to relieve pressure on her brain and complete the life-saving surgery.

“It was a horrible operation and the doctor came out and said she was in bad shape,” her father Greg Barnett said.

“She was in an artificial coma and on a ventilator, but they had to wake her up every hour for about a week to ask her questions like ‘where are you? what’s your name?’ to see what her brain was doing.”

Pictured: Annie Barnett with friends in Queensland before being told she had five brain aneurysms

Pictured: Annie Barnett with friends in Queensland before being told she had five brain aneurysms

Doctors removed part of Annie Barnett's skull to relieve pressure on her brain (pictured)

Doctors removed part of Annie Barnett’s skull to relieve pressure on her brain (pictured)

A week later, the 21-year-old miraculously sat up in bed and talked to her family with a large bandage over her head saying ‘no bone’ to show where the piece of her skull was missing.

Experts said she exceeded expectations in her recovery, and a week after that, she was moved to her own room and awaited surgery to remove the four remaining aneurysms.

“A few days before she had surgery, a doctor told me there was less than a one percent chance that those aneurysms would rupture within 10 years,” Barnett said.

“The second tore later that night.”

Mrs. Barnett said the moment it burst was terrifying because she was in excruciating pain again – just like when the first tore.

Pictured: Annie with her parents Greg and Carol.  The couple have two sons, Bernie, 19, and Matthew, 15

Pictured: Annie with her parents Greg and Carol. The couple have two sons, Bernie, 19, and Matthew, 15

Pictured: Annie Burnett with her brother Bernie, 19, her mother Carol, 54, and her father Greg, 57

Pictured: Annie Burnett with her brother Bernie, 19, her mother Carol, 54, and her father Greg, 57

Pictured: Annie with a friend in the hospital as she recovers from multiple brain surgeries

Pictured: Annie with a friend in the hospital as she recovers from multiple brain surgeries

“I lost feeling in my legs and felt like I couldn’t move,” she said.

“I lay there for about an hour and a half before a dozen or so doctors came in.”

Her devastated family had to say goodbye — “people don’t survive two ruptured aneurysms in a fortnight,” her father said.

The young woman looked sickly and gray.

Her condition did not deteriorate over the next two weeks, she did not wake up and medical personnel said it was very likely that she would be brain dead.

In another tragic turn of events, her parents received a call from the hospital to say she had suffered a stroke.

The 21-year-old (right) hopes to complete her last semester of college and become a social media marketing manager

The 21-year-old (right) hopes to complete her last semester of college and become a social media marketing manager

Annie Burnett's parents said goodbye to their daughter (pictured right) after she suffered a stroke

Annie Burnett’s parents said goodbye to their daughter (pictured right) after she suffered a stroke

“Nurses patted us on the shoulder and said she was sorry, that there was no hope, but we kept saying there was hope as long as she lived,” her father recalled.

“Even if she had a serious brain injury, we said it was okay — we’ll take care of her.”

Despite the poor prognosis, the young woman regained consciousness and slowly began to improve.

In about two weeks, Mrs. Barnett has re-learned to walk, talk and feed herself properly and will soon be discharged from the hospital until mid-January when she returns to have her remaining three aneurysms clipped to ensure they don’t burst. .

While she’s excited to recover and finish her last semester in college, she fears her entire family could be living with undetected aneurysms.

“There’s a possibility the aneurysms are genetic, so we all had MRI scans on Tuesday and we’re waiting for the results,” Mr Barnett said.

Young woman is excited to have her three remaining brain aneurysms clipped to ensure they don't burst

Young woman is excited to have her three remaining brain aneurysms clipped to ensure they don’t burst

21-year-old (pictured right) wants to spread awareness about brain aneurysms

21-year-old (pictured right) wants to spread awareness about brain aneurysms

To help the family with living expenses while their daughter is in the hospital, Mr. Barnett’s sister has a… Go finance me campaign.

The 21-year-old wants to continue her marketing efforts when she finally recovers, and hopes to partner with Aneurysm Support Australia to raise awareness.

“I’ve met so many people who had the same thing as me and they didn’t know what it was, but most of them were in their 40s or 50s – I was definitely the youngest,” she said.

“Most people don’t know it’s hereditary, and I think there should be more awareness.”

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