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Anne Heche was trapped in burning home for 45 MINUTES after she crashed her car in Los Angeles

Anne Heche was trapped in a burning house for 45 minutes until firefighters were able to reach her after plowing into the home at 90 mph.

Data from the Los Angeles Fire Department showed that first responders were unable to access Heche’s total Mini Cooper for at least 20 minutes and it took more than 20 minutes to rescue her. NBC 4 reported.

The records show that firefighters became confused in the chaos, unable to see her body, which had been rolled onto the floor, and mistakenly believed she had been rescued when they pulled the homeowner from the burning house.

“Given the severe fire and smoke conditions, it wasn’t like you could see clearly inside the vehicle or have clear access to it,” LAFD Deputy Chief Richard Fields told the outlet.

It took Los Angeles firefighters about 45 minutes to rescue Anne Heche from a burning building after crashing into it at 90mph, LAFD records show

It took Los Angeles firefighters about 45 minutes to rescue Anne Heche from a burning building after crashing into it at 90mph, LAFD records show

The actress died from burns and injuries she sustained in the crash.  Although she was pictured with a vodka in her cup holder just before the crash, officials discovered she was actually using cocaine during the incident.

The actress died from burns and injuries she sustained in the crash.  Although she was pictured with a vodka in her cup holder just before the crash, officials discovered she was actually using cocaine during the incident.

The actress died from burns and injuries she sustained in the crash. Although she was pictured with a vodka in her cup holder just before the crash, officials discovered she was actually using cocaine during the incident.

The records show that firefighters were confused in the chaos, unable to see her body inside the destroyed and burning vehicle (pictured)

The records show that firefighters were confused in the chaos, unable to see her body inside the destroyed and burning vehicle (pictured)

The records show that firefighters were confused in the chaos, unable to see her body inside the destroyed and burning vehicle (pictured)

Firefighters enter the property as large clouds of smoke rise from the crash site at high speed, making it difficult to locate Heche

Firefighters enter the property as large clouds of smoke rise from the crash site at high speed, making it difficult to locate Heche

Firefighters enter the property as large clouds of smoke rise from the crash site at high speed, making it difficult to locate Heche

LAFD deputy chief Richard Fields said his firefighters were doing everything they could to save the late actress and the woman whose house she collapsed.

LAFD deputy chief Richard Fields said his firefighters were doing everything they could to save the late actress and the woman whose house she collapsed.

LAFD deputy chief Richard Fields said his firefighters were doing everything they could to save the late actress and the woman whose house she collapsed.

According to the timestamp on the fire department’s footage, the first of 59 firefighters arrived at the burning house at 11:01 am on August 5, with reports that the Heche was trapped in the car.

“There is a person trapped in the vehicle,” the dispatcher said at the time.

After homeowner Lynne Mishele was rescued from the fire, officials mistakenly believed that there was no one else in the house, where the vehicle could not be seen.

“We don’t have any patients at the moment,” a firefighter reported at 11:18 a.m

Four minutes later, commanders began asking for further confirmation about the driver of the wrecked car.

“Let me clear this up, so you do have a patient in the car,” one of the commanders asked at 11:22 AM.

At 11:25 a.m., a firefighter alerted the commanders that they had found the driver of the car on the floor of the passenger seat.

“We have identified one patient who is currently unreachable, he has been pressed to the floor,” the firefighter said over the radio as he spoke through his oxygen mask.

Emergency services had to wait for a heavy tow truck to brave the fire and pull the car out, rescuing Heche around 11:49 am.

“We have one patient in the car, who is being assessed, who is about to be loaded onto the stretcher for transport,” a firefighter reported at the time.

1662182221 825 Anne Heche was trapped in burning home for 45 MINUTES

1662182221 825 Anne Heche was trapped in burning home for 45 MINUTES

Firefighters arrived at the scene at 11:01 am on August 5, shortly after the crash, and tried to contain the flames to enable the rescue efforts

Firefighters arrived at the scene at 11:01 am on August 5, shortly after the crash, and tried to contain the flames to enable the rescue efforts

Firefighters arrived at the scene at 11:01 am on August 5, shortly after the crash, and tried to contain the flames to enable the rescue efforts

It wasn't until 11:25 a.m. that firefighters were able to confirm that Heche was still trapped in the car and it took more than 20 minutes to pull her out (pictured)

It wasn't until 11:25 a.m. that firefighters were able to confirm that Heche was still trapped in the car and it took more than 20 minutes to pull her out (pictured)

It wasn’t until 11:25 a.m. that firefighters were able to confirm that Heche was still trapped in the car and it took more than 20 minutes to pull her out (pictured)

Officials said 59 firefighters took more than an hour to extinguish the blaze

Officials said 59 firefighters took more than an hour to extinguish the blaze

Officials said 59 firefighters took more than an hour to extinguish the blaze

She was left badly burned and slipped into a coma after being transported to Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.

Heche suffered a “severe anoxic brain injury” caused by a lack of oxygen, according to a statement released on behalf of her family and friends.

She was pronounced brain dead seven days later, but was kept alive until her organs could be donated.

Heche’s life support machine was disabled on August 14, and she was cremated on August 18.

A coroner ruled on August 17 that Heche died of inhalation and burns, and the death was deemed an accident.

The mother of two also had a fractured sternum caused by “blunt trauma,” according to information on the Los Angeles County Medical Examiner-Coroner website.

The Emmy-winning film and television actress was removed from living at the Grossman Burn Center at West Hills Hospital.

Blood tests showed the actress had cocaine and fentanyl in her body when the high-speed crash occurred, but officials confirmed she hadn’t consumed alcohol – despite being pictured with a vodka bottle in her cup holder.

Pictured: Los Angeles firefighters work to put out the fire from the roof of the burning house

Pictured: Los Angeles firefighters work to put out the fire from the roof of the burning house

Pictured: Los Angeles firefighters work to put out the fire from the roof of the burning house

The house Heche bumped into was left decimated, but the homeowner was rescued

The house Heche bumped into was left decimated, but the homeowner was rescued

The house Heche bumped into was left decimated, but the homeowner was rescued

An interior shot shows the Mini Clubman's airbag deflated, along with most of the decor burned after the crash

An interior shot shows the Mini Clubman's airbag deflated, along with most of the decor burned after the crash

An interior shot shows the Mini Clubman’s airbag deflated, along with most of the decor burned after the crash

The actress lost control of her car when it drove into a house and started a fire that severely burned her, leaving her in “extremely critical condition,” her representative said.

It took 59 firefighters 65 minutes to “access, contain and completely extinguish the persistent flames” caused by the Heche crash.

LAFD Deputy Chief Fields said it took firefighters about 30 minutes to contain the flames to the point where rescue would be possible.

“I can imagine that, just from some of the very experienced officers who started the firefight, they went out of their way to try to identify someone was in the vehicle,” Fields told NBC 4.

“Our firefighters did everything.”

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