Angry people tend to overestimate their intelligence levels

If you have a bad temper, you probably will not be as smart as you think, according to a new study. Researchers have revealed that angry people are more likely to overestimate their intelligence levels (stock image)

If you suffer with a bad temper, you probably are not as smart as you think you are, according to a new study.

According to scientists, angry people are more likely to overestimate their intelligence levels than those with a quieter disposition.

That's because being angry is linked to high levels of narcissism, as well as a greater belief in your skills and competence.

Those with a short fuse were also more likely to have trouble maintaining a stable relationship, according to the latest findings.

This is because people with high levels of narcissism struggle to establish links with others, as they are always trying to master them.

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If you have a bad temper, you probably will not be as smart as you think, according to a new study. Researchers have revealed that angry people are more likely to overestimate their intelligence levels (stock image)

If you have a bad temper, you probably will not be as smart as you think, according to a new study. Researchers have revealed that angry people are more likely to overestimate their intelligence levels (stock image)

"In a recent project, I examined the relationship between anger and various cognitive functions," said lead researcher Marcin Zajenkowski, of the School of Psychology at the University of Warsaw.

"I noticed from the literature review that anger differs significantly from other negative emotions, such as sadness, anxiety or depression," she told Pyspost.org.

"Anger is more focused on the approach and is associated with a perception of optimistic risk and a generally optimistic bias".

The researchers set out to examine whether people with higher levels of anger would have a greater belief in their skills and competence.

After conducting two studies with a total of 528 participants, the researchers found that people who had a quick temper overestimated their intelligence.

Participants were asked about their temperament and rated their own intelligence on a 25-point scale.

Then, the researchers asked the participants to perform an intelligence test to verify if the self-reported intelligence levels coincided with the real ones.

"People with high-trait anger tend to overestimate their abilities, that is, they think they are smarter than they really are." This part of anger is associated with narcissistic illusions, "said Zajenkowski.

The researchers found no relationship between the temperament of the participants and their level of intelligence, only how they perceived their own abilities.

The study also showed that angry people often had problems forming relationships.

"People with high narcissism do not establish deep and intimate links with others, but surpass and dominate others," the researchers wrote in the document published in the journal Intelligence.

"As a result, Trait Trait is associated with problems in relationships," the researchers wrote.

"Often, experiences of anger can result in thoughts such as" I am smart "and" You are stupid, "which in turn can cause problems in creating positive relationships with others."

The researchers set out to examine whether people with higher levels of anger would have a greater belief in their skills and competence (stock image)

The researchers set out to examine whether people with higher levels of anger would have a greater belief in their skills and competence (stock image)

The researchers set out to examine whether people with higher levels of anger would have a greater belief in their skills and competence (stock image)

In May, it was revealed that those who wear glasses are actually smarter than people with perfect vision.

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh found significant links between intelligence and poor vision while carrying out the world's largest genetic study on cognitive function.

The study analyzed genetic data of 300,486 people between 16 and 102 years old who had participated in 57 studies in Australia, Europe and North America.

Participants participated in a variety of thought tests, and the results were aggregated into a general cognitive ability score.

Those who scored highest on cognitive tests were 30 percent more likely to need glasses, compared to those who scored poorly.

The study also showed links between increased cognitive ability and genes that play a crucial role in good cardiovascular health.

Unfortunately, the design of the study meant that the researchers could not say why there is a correlation between a person's intelligence, poor vision and cardiovascular health.

WHAT IS IQ?

IQ stands for intelligence quotient and is used to measure mental capacity.

The abbreviation & # 39; IQ & # 39; It was coined for the first time by the psychologist William Stern to describe the German term Intelligenzquotient.

Historically, the IQ is a score achieved by dividing a person's mental age, obtained with an intelligence test, by their age.

The resulting fraction is multiplied by 100 to obtain an IQ score.

An IQ of 100 has been considered for a long time as the median score.

Because of the way test results are scaled, a person with an IQ of 60 is not half as smart as someone with an IQ of 120.

The provision of IQ scores also means that the results are "normally distributed", which means that the same number of people get a score on each side of the average.

For example, the same number of people scores 70 as people who score 130.

Although the accuracy of intelligence tests is somewhat discussed, they are still widely used.

For Mensa, the acceptance score requires that members be within the top two percent of the general population.

Depending on the IQ test, this may require a score of at least 130.

IQ scores of famous people:

  • Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking – 160
  • Donald Trump – 156
  • Emma Watson – 138
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger – 135
  • Nicole Kidman – 132

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