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Katherine & # 39; Katie & # 39; King, from California, was diagnosed in June 2015 with a tumor known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG).
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The parents of a girl who died of a brain tumor are furious after having received a medical bill in her name three years later.

Katherine & # 39; Katie & # 39; King, from California, was diagnosed in June 2015 with a tumor known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG).

Her parents, Jaime and David, contacted various hospitals and doctors for treatment options – all of whom said nothing could be done.

In June 2016, one year after her diagnosis, Katie died. Her parents shared a heartbreaking video of her last moments.

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On Monday, they revealed that their insurance company, Aetna, had sent them an overpaid check and – instead of sending it to her mother or father – was directed to Katie.

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Katherine & # 39; Katie & # 39; King, from California, was diagnosed in June 2015 with a tumor known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG).

Katherine & # 39; Katie & # 39; King, from California, was diagnosed in June 2015 with a tumor known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG).

On Monday, three years after Katie's death, her parents received an overpaid check from Aetna addressed to her (photo)

On Monday, three years after Katie's death, her parents received an overpaid check from Aetna addressed to her (photo)

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On Monday, three years after Katie's death, her parents received an overpaid check from Aetna addressed to her (photo)

DIPG & # 39; s are rare and inoperable brain tumors with a two-year survival rate of 10 percent. Pictured: Katie

DIPG & # 39; s are rare and inoperable brain tumors with a two-year survival rate of 10 percent. Pictured: Katie

Katie (photo) had nine months to live, but died a year later in June 2016

Katie (photo) had nine months to live, but died a year later in June 2016

DIPG & # 39; s are rare and inoperable brain tumors with a two-year survival rate of 10 percent. Katie (left and right) was given nine months to live, but died a year later in June 2016

Jaime shared the photo on Facebook, along with a caption in which she expressed her indignation.

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& # 39; It took our insurance company three years to lower the check for too many payments for Katherine's medical costs. Three years. And then … they sent that check to HER name. What's wrong with people? & # 39; she wrote.

& # 39; She was 7. She died 3 years ago. She has not been medically treated by anyone for three years. Perhaps her parents do not want to receive a check for their deceased child in the name of their deceased child. Maybe her guardians should be mentioned ??? & # 39;

Jaime said that David contacted the banker, who immediately deposited the check into their account.

& # 39; (David) was visibly upset and we were both a little numb the rest of the day & # 39 ;, she wrote.

PLACING A DIPG TUMOR

DIPG (Diffuse intrinsic Pontine Gliom) is a malignant brain tumor that is growing rapidly and is likely to spread.

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DIPGs are glial tumors, which means that they originate from the glial tissue of the brain – tissue that consists of cells that support and protect the neurons of the brain

They are found in a lower part of the brainstem, called the punch.

The punch is responsible for a number of critical body functions, such as breathing, sleeping and blood pressure.

DIPG's account for 10 percent of all central nervous system tumors in children. Every year, between 200 and 300 children are diagnosed in the US, usually between five and nine years.

The symptoms of DIPG usually develop very quickly prior to diagnosis, due to the rapid growth of these tumors.

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The most common symptoms are:

  • Problems with balance and walking
  • Eye problems (including double vision, drooping eyelids, uncontrolled eye movements, blurred vision)
  • Problems with chewing and swallowing
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Morning headache or headache that gets better after the child vomits
  • Visual weakness or hanging (usually one side)

Surgery to remove the tumor is not always an option because of the dangers of surgery on critical areas of the brain. Radiotherapy is usually the standard treatment.

The prognosis for DIPG & # 39; s remains very poor, although a small percentage of patients survive this disease.

Only 10 percent of children with DIPG survive two years after their diagnosis and less than one percent survive for five years.

Katie & # 39; s first symptom of her tumor started early 2015 with a lazy left eye. She then had fever problems with walking, difficulty in talking, and balance problems in April.

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& # 39; We started noticing eye behavior very early in 2015. You could see on photo & # 39; s that her eye was off & # 39 ;, Jaime told DailyMail.com in 2017.

& # 39; We took her to an eye doctor, but they said: & # 39; She sees 20/20, it's fine, & # 39; so we left. & # 39;

Most doctors rejected Katie's symptoms and said they would improve themselves.

In mid-May, the kings went to an optometrist, who unofficially diagnosed a brain tumor for Katie.

& # 39; The optometrist said, "I am not qualified to give you a diagnosis. In principle, your daughter sees 20/20, but her brain tells her she sees twice, this is serious." I was crying there at the office, & Jaime said.

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& # 39; She went to talk to her colleague and then came back and said: "You have to go to the hospital, but you are not going anywhere with an optometrist referral. It is better if you go back to your doctor, tell him exactly what I just told you, and let him refer you & # 39;. & # 39;

The pediatrician refused and after a few weeks Katie & # 39; s parents took her to the hospital alone.

She was diagnosed with DIPG in the first week of June.

The tumor is a very rare and very aggressive form of cancer that is usually found in children between five and nine years.

Every year between 200 and 300 children are diagnosed in the US.

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This type of tumor is located at the base of the brain and the top of the spine, but it is unknown what the cause is.

The tumors exert pressure on the area of ​​the brain, called the punch, which are responsible for a number of critical body functions, such as breathing, sleeping and blood pressure.

Over time, the tumor affects heart rate, breathing, swallowing, vision and balance.

Some of the first symptoms of the tumor are problems with eye movements, weakness in the face, difficulty walking, strange limb movements and problems with balance.

Most people with this type of cancer only live nine months after the first diagnosis, and some don't even get long enough to receive radiation treatment.

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Katie got no more than nine months to live.

& # 39; Your only option is radiation, & # 39; Jaime said.

& # 39; When you do tests, they are all phase 1, so the child is pumped with chemo (therapy) until they can no longer cope. Phase 2 brings them to that limit.

& # 39; We did not go that route because no one with DIPG has ever survived; there have been deaths because their bodies cannot tolerate it. & # 39;

Shortly after her diagnosis, in July 2015, Katie received a dose of Avastin, an anticancer medicine that she hoped would control or shrink her tumor (photo)

Shortly after her diagnosis, in July 2015, Katie received a dose of Avastin, an anticancer medicine that she hoped would control or shrink her tumor (photo)

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Shortly after her diagnosis, in July 2015, Katie received a dose of Avastin, an anticancer medicine that she hoped would control or shrink her tumor (photo)

With very few doctors or families sharing information about deaths from DIPG, her parents shared a video of Katie's final moments. Pictured: Katie, early 2016

With very few doctors or families sharing information about deaths from DIPG, her parents shared a video of Katie's final moments. Pictured: Katie, early 2016

With very few doctors or families sharing information about deaths from DIPG, her parents shared a video of Katie's final moments. Pictured: Katie, early 2016

The video was shared on the annual anniversary of Katie & # 39; s death in June 2017. Pictured, from left to right: David, Jaime and Katie at the end of 2015

The video was shared on the annual anniversary of Katie & # 39; s death in June 2017. Pictured, from left to right: David, Jaime and Katie at the end of 2015

The video was shared on the annual anniversary of Katie & # 39; s death in June 2017. Pictured, from left to right: David, Jaime and Katie at the end of 2015

Her parents tried a few drugs for clinical trials, but nothing helped to reduce her tumor.

About seven months after her diagnosis, Jaime and David changed their investigation of how to save their daughter's life to how to make her death as painless as possible.

Doctors, however, had no other answers DIPG families had shared the last moments of their children's lives.

Jaime and David decided to share it.

& # 39; I don't think people know about this – about DIPG, about the lack of treatment, about the lack of funding and about how a child's life is needed. I think if we shared this, it would make a difference, & she said.

In the video, filmed in the last few minutes of her life, Jaime can be seen lying on a bed next to Katie, while David is sitting in a chair on the other side caressing her hair.

They tell her that she will no longer be in pain or have to take medication and that she will soon be able to run, sing and dance.

The couple shared the video in June 2017, on the occasion of the anniversary of Katie & # 39; s death.

Jaime said there was a mix of support and bright black from their decision and sometimes she doesn't even know for sure if it was the right one.

& # 39; Sharing this was a violation of her privacy; exploit her to show the truth of what all of our children who have died from cancer are experiencing, & said Jaime.

& # 39; I regret it every day, but I would do it again. This was the one who showed me the truth. & # 39;

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