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Ucles lost 7 kg by the time his odyssey over one of the most remote landscapes in the world was complete

Adventurer and conservationist Andrew Ucles is the first documented man to cross the vastness of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory.

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The 31-year-old from Wollongong, south of Sydney, spent 42 days in the remote Outback landscape.

He traveled 586 km on foot and on the back of his horse – preferably called Arnhem – although the local population regarded the animal as & # 39; green & # 39; and not suitable for the site.

Mr Ucles only took what he could wear and lived on water buffalo, reed toads, wild pigs and fish – lost 7 kg by the time his odyssey was complete.

& # 39; I love the northern territory. I have been to Arnhem Land before and that area is such a huge, almost mythical landscape. The danger of the place seemed very real and I wanted to overcome that fear, "he told Daily Mail Australia.

Ucles lost 7 kg by the time his odyssey over one of the most remote landscapes in the world was complete

Ucles lost 7 kg by the time his odyssey over one of the most remote landscapes in the world was complete

Adventurer and conservationist Andrew Ucles is the first documented man to cross the vastness of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory
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Adventurer and conservationist Andrew Ucles is the first documented man to cross the vastness of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory

Adventurer and conservationist Andrew Ucles is the first documented man to cross the vastness of Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory

He described his experiences for survival in the remote unspoilt landscape.

& # 39; The easiest way to get food was spearfish bream, barramundi or cherabin (a kind of giant freshwater shrimp), & # 39; said Mr. Ucles.

& # 39; There were many reed toads, they actually tasted like a cross between quail and fish. However, you must prepare and cook them very carefully to prevent toxins.

& # 39; Water buffalo were probably the most dangerous animals I had contact with. To go to a water hole with my horse and have a kind face to it.

& # 39; They can charge and their horns are sharp enough to puncture rubber car tires. & # 39;

He only took what he could wear and lived on water buffalo, reed toads, wild pigs and fish
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He only took what he could wear and lived on water buffalo, reed toads, wild pigs and fish

He only took what he could wear and lived on water buffalo, reed toads, wild pigs and fish

The 31-year-old from Wollongong in New South Wales spent 42 days in the remote inland landscape

The 31-year-old from Wollongong in New South Wales spent 42 days in the remote inland landscape

The 31-year-old from Wollongong in New South Wales spent 42 days in the remote inland landscape

Hunting water buffalo was not an easy feat, but he found the best way to choose the weakest link in the herd and pursue that animal.

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& # 39; There is a big difference between chasing a pig or a buffalo than saying trying to chase an emu or kangaroo at 30 kilometers per hour, & # 39; said Mr. Ucles.

& # 39; I took salt to preserve the meat so that one animal would leave me for 4 or 5 days. & # 39;

He described the most dangerous part of his journey as not being able to find water.

& # 39; I had mapped out my route before I left using GPS locations where there was water because the rest stops every day. I came to the location twice and there was no water, & he said.

& # 39; So Arnhem and I went all night to the second location – 35 km by the time we got there. Towards the end I was hallucinating – the termite mounds were moving. & # 39;

Ucles has been a passionate conservationist since he was seven years old
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Ucles has been a passionate conservationist since he was seven years old

Ucles has been a passionate conservationist since he was seven years old

Mr Ucles traveled 586 km on foot and on the back of his horse - aptly called Arnhem and still what the locals & # 39; green & # 39; mentions or has not been broken into properly.

Mr Ucles traveled 586 km on foot and on the back of his horse - aptly called Arnhem and still what the locals & # 39; green & # 39; mentions or has not been broken into properly.

Mr Ucles traveled 586 km on foot and on the back of his horse – aptly called Arnhem and still what the locals & # 39; green & # 39; mentions or has not been broken into properly.

Mr Ucles has been a nature lover and conservationist since he was seven years old.

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His father had landed at the age of 13 due to a particularly nasty snake bite and his father warned him that his passion could kill him – but he replied that this was who he is.

His love of nature has taken him to Africa, Asia, North America and the Amazon all over the world – documenting his interactions with wildlife on his YouTube channel.

His channel has more than half a million subscribers and 150 million views – with its unique approach and skills that offer a fresh perspective on interaction with nature.

The first episode of his new two-part documentary series was broadcast on the History Channel in the United States on Thursday.

The adventurer packed salt so that he could save water buffalo meat for five days

The adventurer packed salt so that he could save water buffalo meat for five days

The adventurer packed salt so that he could save water buffalo meat for five days

He describes that the scariest parts of the trip could not find water

He describes that the scariest parts of the trip could not find water

He describes that the scariest parts of the trip could not find water

The documentary – which, among other things, took him to the depths of the jungle of Myanmar – explores the facts and fiction behind the biggest predator attacks in history.

& # 39; I want to turn the Arnhem Land trek into a documentary with a focus on promoting indigenous culture in the region. The people there have a very important story to tell, & he said.

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He believes that many problems related to youth in the Northern Territory can be helped by programs that connect young people back to the landscape – with the modern world and the distractions that often break our connection to nature.

& # 39; I have a huge respect for the indigenous guards of the country. I did this for 42 days. How native Australians did that for tens of thousands of years is amazing, & he said.

& # 39; I want to turn the Arnhem Land trek into a documentary with a focus on promoting indigenous culture in the region. The people there have a very important story to tell & he said

& # 39; I want to turn the Arnhem Land trek into a documentary with a focus on promoting indigenous culture in the region. The people there have a very important story to tell & he said

& # 39; I want to turn the Arnhem Land trek into a documentary with a focus on promoting indigenous culture in the region. The people there have a very important story to tell & he said

& # 39; I have a huge respect for the indigenous guards of the country. I did this for 42 days. How native Australians did that for tens of thousands of years is amazing & # 39;

& # 39; I have a huge respect for the indigenous guards of the country. I did this for 42 days. How native Australians did that for tens of thousands of years is amazing & # 39;

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& # 39; I have a huge respect for the indigenous guards of the country. I did this for 42 days. How native Australians did that for tens of thousands of years is amazing & # 39;

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