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Anderson Cooper SLAMS To call Rod Blagojevich a “political prisoner” for himself

Former Illinois governor Rod Blagojevich was beaten by Anderson Cooper because he stated that he was a ‘political prisoner’ four days after President Donald Trump had converted the 14-year prison sentence he received for extortion, bribery and fraud.

Blagojevich’s, 63, comments came with during a hot interview CNN started on Friday evening with a debate on evidence used in his 2008 case.

When Cooper points out that Blagojevich “portrays himself the victim of prosecution,” the former Democratic politician replied that he is still being treated unfairly.

“I don’t think they looked good because I’m a political prisoner,” he said.

After Blagojevich makes the remarks, Cooper quickly dives in and pushes back by noting that political prisoners are not getting the right trial and that a jury deliberately chose to convict him.

During an interview with CNN’s Anderson Cooper (left), former Illinois Gov said. Rod Blagojevich (right) that he was a “political prisoner” after his time in prison

In addition, an appeal court has reviewed the case and Blagojevich has twice unsuccessfully appealed to the Supreme Court.

Cooper continued to question Blagoyevich’s “political prisoner” remark, noting that Nelson Mandela, the former president of South Africa who was imprisoned for fighting apartheid, was a more appropriate example.

In response, Blagojevich said, “If you asked Nelson Mandela if he thought the South African trial was fair in the early 1960s, he would say what I am saying today.”

The two men also hit the head when Blagojevich said he wanted to defend the reform of the criminal justice system after spending eight years in prison.

Cooper (left) called Blagojevich (right) because he was blamed for a “handful of corrupt prosecutors” who allegedly lied to the jury during his trial

He said: “I have learned something in these eight years and that is that we have a racist and corrupt criminal justice system in many areas.

“And this is why I hope that one day you might join me in the struggle to reform our criminal justice system.”

Cooper called Blagojevich “sad,” “pathetic,” and “ironic” for praising criminal reforms now rather than “really matter.”

“There are many people in Illinois who actually … spit when you say that,” he said.

“Because when you were actually in power, and when you were actually a governor, you could have helped thousands of people with leniency cases [but] you blew it away. “

Blagojevich went on blaming a “handful of corrupt prosecutors” who misused their power for his long prison sentence.

He said: ‘They are uncontrolled and they are the ones that Chief Justice Breyer spoke about when he said that our country is in trouble.

“Because of these uncontrolled prosecutors who can do just about anything they want to do and use their power to go after government officials for what – what he called routine practice, and I went to jail for that.”

Blagojevich also claimed that his time behind bars was orchestrated by prosecutors who “lied to the jury” about his legal actions.

In response to Cooper who mentioned his claims that he was deliberately derailed “bull ****”, Blagojevich said: “I lived it myself. It is not a bull **** ‘

“What I am saying is that I was thrown into prison and spent nearly eight years in prison for practicing politics – for searching for campaign contributions without a consideration,” he said.

“No explicit consideration – and I got the same standards as Senator Menendez. I could very well have been in the US Senate instead of where I was. “

Cooper then said that the claims of Blagojevich were not credible during his trial and that they still do not endure years later.

“You are the one who was actually convicted of lying to the FBI by the same jury,” Cooper said.

“The very argument you are making now … it was heard in court and nobody bought it.

Cooper ended the segment by stating that Blagojevich “has created a whole new alternative universe of facts, and that can be big in politics today, but to be honest, it’s just bull ****.” We have to leave it there. “

An upset Blagojevich hit back in Cooper and said, “Well, no, it’s not a bull ****.” I lived it myself. It is not a bull **** at all. ”

Blagojevich (photo) was first arrested in his home in 2008 for various allegations, including attempting to request Barack Obama's Senate seat after winning the presidency

Blagojevich (photo) was first arrested in his home in 2008 for various charges, including attempting to request Barack Obama's Senate seat after winning the presidency

Blagojevich (photo) was first arrested in his home in 2008 for various allegations, including attempting to request Barack Obama’s Senate seat after winning the presidency

In 2008, Blagojevich was arrested in his home by the FBI and arrested on a federal magistrate’s charge of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and request bribes.

He was also accused of trying to take advantage of requesting the seat of the former Senate of President Barack Obama after he left for the White House in 2008.

A month later, the Illinois House removed Blagojevich from office with an astonishing 114 to one vote.

The US Senate would remove Blagojevich from its position a few weeks later with a vote from 59 to zero.

He argued for a mercy plea that he “never intended to break the law” for senators.

Prosecutors would later add racketeering, fraud and extortion charges to the Blagojevich rap sheet.

During the trial, Blagoevich maintained his innocence and denied being guilty of any misconduct.

A stalled jury convicted Blagojevich for only one of the 24 charges and it was later called a mistrial.

A new trial was to take place in 2011 in which Blagojevich would be convicted of 17 charges and a prison sentence of 14 years in federal prison.

The former government of Illinois was found guilty on 17 of the 20 charges during a new trial by 2011 after his arrest in 2008

The former government of Illinois was found guilty on 17 of the 20 charges during a new trial by 2011 after his arrest in 2008

The former government of Illinois was found guilty on 17 of the 20 charges during a new trial by 2011 after his arrest in 2008

Blagojevich was sentenced to a 14-year federal prison sentence in Illinois in 2011 (photo), but his sentence was turned into President Trump in 2020

Blagojevich was sentenced to a 14-year federal prison sentence in Illinois in 2011 (photo), but his sentence was turned into President Trump in 2020

Blagojevich was sentenced to a 14-year federal prison sentence in Illinois in 2011 (photo), but his sentence was turned into President Trump in 2020

“Frankly, I am astonished,” said Blagojevich at the time, according to the Chicago Tribune.

“There is not much more to say than we want to come home with our little girls and talk to them and explain things to them and try to solve things.”

The Supreme Court and a court of appeal would not influence Blagojevich’s conviction and he served eight years.

However, President Donald Trump agreed to change his prison sentence in February 2020 and he was officially released on the 18th.

“What he did was I think something personally deserves much appreciation from me, and he has my deepest, most profound and eternal gratitude,” Blagojevich told Trump about reporters.

“I can’t wait to get home. I miss my daughters. I miss my wife. I miss home. “

Blagojevich waves to friend and family at a press conference at his home in Chicago after Trump converted his sentence in February

Blagojevich waves to friend and family at a press conference at his home in Chicago after Trump converted his sentence in February

Blagojevich waves to friend and family at a press conference at his home in Chicago after Trump converted his sentence in February

Since his release from the federal prison, Blagojevich (left) has expressed his gratitude to Trump (right) and said he is a 'Trumpcrat'

Since his release from the federal prison, Blagojevich (left) has expressed his gratitude to Trump (right) and said that he is a “Trumpcrat”

Trump first mentioned the potential of the prison sentence of Blagojevich in 2018 and later doubled in August 2019.

He said: “Rod Blagojevich, the former governor of Illinois, was sentenced to 14 years in prison. He has served 7 years. “

“Many people have asked that I study the possibility of turning his sentence into a very serious sentence. The White House staff continues to assess this issue. ”

Trump later called the condemnation of Blagojevich “enormously powerful, ridiculous punishment” and seemed to support the claims that the prosecution was unfair.

Blagojevich (photo): 'What [Trump] did I think something that deserves great appreciation in person, and he has my deepest, most profound and eternal gratitude '

Blagojevich (photo): 'What [Trump] did I think something that deserves great appreciation in person, and he has my deepest, most profound and eternal gratitude '

Blagojevich (photo): ‘What [Trump] did I think something that deserves great appreciation in person, and he has my deepest, most profound and eternal gratitude ‘

“[The case] was a persecution by the same people, Comey, Fitzpatrick, the same group, “he said.

Trump’s referral to former FBI director James Comey stems from a tumultuous investigation into his possible connections with Russia during the 2016 elections.

The president has repeatedly claimed that he was wrongly targeted by members of the FBI and the Democrats.

Trump founded the commute of the sentence by calling Comey again.

“Rod Blagojevich did not sell the Senate seat. He served in prison for 8 years, with many left over. He paid a big price. Another Comey and gang deal! ‘ he said.

Blagojevich has since called himself a “Trumpocrat” in recognition of Trump.

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