Ancestry.com is under fire for their deaf advertisement with RUNAWAY SLAVE with her white lover

Ancestry.com under fire for tone deaf advertisement & # 39; romanticizing slavery & # 39; to the latest video from the genealogy site with the white man who promises a black enslaved woman to escape to the north

  • The latest advertisement from the company shows a runaway slave woman who meets her with her white lover who crosses her & # 39; to the north & & # 39; flights & # 39;
  • Named inseparable, the ad follows a black woman named Abigail Williams
  • It shows that the woman's name & # 39; Abigail Williams & # 39; is before she presented a marriage certificate that Ancestry.com said she received with a & # 39; James Miller & # 39;
  • Social media users were furious with the ad, with many feeling that it was inaccurately portraying and enchanting a traumatic experience
  • It was posted on Ancestry Canada & # 39; s YouTube page on April 2
  • Ancestry.com could not be reached for a response

Ancestry.com was widely mocked about its toneless advertising that seems to romanticize slavery to sell its DNA services.

The advertisement – Inseparable – follows a black slave woman named Abigail Williams who meets her white lover who tells her that he is crossing her & # 39; to the north wants & # 39; flights & # 39 ;.

It was posted on Ancestry Canada & # 39; s YouTube page on April 2. Ancestry.com could not be reached for a response.

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The latest advertisement from Ancestr.com shows a runaway slave woman who meets her with her white lover who crosses her & # 39; to & # 39; north & # 39; wants to flee.

The latest advertisement from Ancestr.com shows a runaway slave woman who meets her with her white lover who crosses her & # 39; to & # 39; north & # 39; wants to flee.

& # 39; Abigail, we can escape to the north & # 39 ;, the man tells the slave girl while holding her a ring.

The woman tries to speak before her savior cuts her off and claims: & There is a place where we can be together, across the border. Are you coming with me? & # 39; & # 39; Without you, the story ends here & # 39 ;, is the advertisement after showing the woman who looks at him longingly.

It shows that the woman's name & # 39; Abigail Williams & # 39; before she presented a marriage certificate that Ancestry.com said when she was a & # 39; James Miller & # 39; received.

A TV spot description for the ad: & A long time ago, a man asked a woman named Abigail Williams to flee north with him, where they could keep each other free of judgment and without judging their skin colors. Their story went further, but Ancestry leaves it up to you to save the story of this couple by revealing the lost chapters from your own history. & # 39;

But many viewers were furious with the advertisement, and many felt that it was an inaccurate portrayal and enchantment of a traumatic experience that many black people had in mind.

& # 39; Abigail, we can escape to the north & # 39 ;, the man tells the slave as they make their way under a building that is supposed to be in & # 39; the south & # 39; to lay down

& # 39; Abigail, we can escape to the north & # 39 ;, the man tells the slave as they make their way under a building that is supposed to be in & # 39; the south & # 39; to lay down

& # 39; Abigail, we can escape to the north & # 39 ;, the man tells the slave as they make their way under a building that is supposed to be in & # 39; the south & # 39; to lay down

The woman tries to speak before her savior cuts her off and claims: & There is a place where we can be together, across the border. Are you coming with me? & # 39;

The woman tries to speak before her savior cuts her off and claims: & There is a place where we can be together, across the border. Are you coming with me? & # 39;

The woman tries to speak before her savior cuts her off and claims: & There is a place where we can be together, across the border. Are you coming with me? & # 39;

& # 39; Without you, the story ends here & # 39 ;, is the advertisement after showing the woman who looks so desperately at her lover

& # 39; Without you, the story ends here & # 39 ;, is the advertisement after showing the woman who looks so desperately at her lover

& # 39; Without you, the story ends here & # 39 ;, is the advertisement after showing the woman who looks so desperately at her lover

Advertisement shows that the woman's name & # 39; Abigail Williams & # 39; is before she presented a marriage certificate that Ancestry.com said she received with a & # 39; James Miller & # 39;

Advertisement shows that the woman's name & # 39; Abigail Williams & # 39; is before she presented a marriage certificate that Ancestry.com said she received with a & # 39; James Miller & # 39;

Advertisement shows that the woman's name & # 39; Abigail Williams & # 39; is before she presented a marriage certificate that Ancestry.com said she received with a & # 39; James Miller & # 39;

& # 39; What about colonization? !!! & # 39; shocked actor Damon Wayans Junior asked.

The comedian Desus Nice took his Twitter with him to show how offensive the joke could be if it were Rosa Parks related.

Another user asked: & # 39; Eh … have you seen the @ Ancestry commercial where a white person tells a black person that they can run away and that there is a place where they can be across the border together? Who approved this? & # 39;

& # 39; Yes. That's not how it happened, & another user explained. & # 39; Black women were raped by white men. No engagement rings, no proposals, nothing. The white people of ancestors are full of s ** t. & # 39;

The comedian Desus Nice took his Twitter with him to show how offensive the joke could be if it were Rosa Parks related. Other users also expressed their annoyance and shock with the video

The comedian Desus Nice took his Twitter with him to show how offensive the joke could be if it were Rosa Parks related. Other users also expressed their annoyance and shock with the video

The comedian Desus Nice took his Twitter with him to show how offensive the joke could be if it were Rosa Parks related. Other users also expressed their annoyance and shock with the video

Writer Clint Smith said: & # 39; Nobody:

& # 39; Ancestry dot com: how can we overly romanticize and make an irresponsible, historical representation of the relationship between white men and black women during the period of chattel-slavery that completely ignores his power dynamics & the trauma of sexual exploitation?

And several other users on YouTube expressed disappointment about the ad.

One person said: & # 39; You literally don't hear black voices before you put this out, do you? Go ahead and admit it. We already know it's true. No one! & # 39;

& # 39; Nonsense of clutter white savior. I will not spend my money on you, & another user said.

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